Spitfire Studio Brass

heisenberg

Senior Member
Cinematic Studio Brass is not released, nor are there any video walkthroughs or substantive demos going through the library. The posts relating toward debating whether one should buy Spitfire's product and CSB is premature, in my view.
 

Seycara

Member
[AUDIOPLUS=https://vi-control.net/community/attachments/sfbr-mp3.16948/][/AUDIOPLUS]


That sounds good to you? Really?

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^This, exactly. I don't know why every time a new gen SF library is released everyone seems to ignore the glaring loss of quality in the legatos that are no where near the level of the old SF air libraries. SStS had very subpar, almost unuseable legatos in my opinion and SStB is shaping up to be the same. Shame that Spitfire chose to cut corners on the sampling/programming of legatos when they have demonstrated the tech to do much better from years ago.

Until SF shows an improvement in this aspect, I will not be buying any of their future releases.
 

Mason

Active Member
^This, exactly. I don't know why every time a new gen SF library is released everyone seems to ignore the glaring loss of quality in the legatos that are no where near the level of the old SF air libraries. SStS had very subpar, almost unuseable legatos in my opinion and SStB is shaping up to be the same. Shame that Spitfire chose to cut corners on the sampling/programming of legatos when they have demonstrated the tech to do much better from years ago.

Until SF shows an improvement in this aspect, I will not be buying any of their future releases.
And what's wrong with the legato in that sample?
 

Oscillator

New Member
And what's wrong with the legato in that sample?
If you can't hear it, it will be difficult to explain. It's quite obvious that the sounds between the notes do not have the connective tissue that a real player would have, but that many libraries are very capable of reproducing at this stage. Regardless, I'm willing to give Spitfire the benefit of the doubt here since the trumpet and tuba solos sounded particularly great in the latter part of the video.
 

Mason

Active Member
If you can't hear it, it will be difficult to explain. It's quite obvious that the sounds between the notes do not have the connective tissue that a real player would have, but that many libraries are very capable of reproducing at this stage. Regardless, I'm willing to give Spitfire the benefit of the doubt here since the trumpet and tuba solos sounded particularly great in the latter part of the video.
There is no legato when horn players play above MF. So there shouldn't be any connective tissue there.
 

Seycara

Member
There is no legato when horn players play above MF. So there shouldn't be any connective tissue there.
There is too much "space" in between the notes and not enough legato transition for SStB's example. Have you heard the cinesamples 12 horn legato @ FFF or OT's Ark I 9 horns legato @ FFF? Those are very good examples of loud horn legati.
 

Oscillator

New Member
There is no legato when horn players play above MF. So there shouldn't be any connective tissue there.
I know a dozen professional horn players who would respond to that statement by either laughing heartily or scratching their heads in confusion. Of course horns can play legato at loud dynamic levels. There are all kinds of passages that call for slurs at that dynamic. If not a legato patch, where would these kinds of note transitions fit in a library?
 

mikefrommontreal

Active Member
Cinematic Studio Brass is not released, nor are there any video walkthroughs or substantive demos going through the library. The posts relating toward debating whether one should buy Spitfire's product and CSB is premature, in my view.
How's that? Neither had been released. Both are coming out around the same time. Both around the same price point. Demos for CSB. Videos for SSB. Many will likely be deciding which one of the two to buy. Entirely relevant.
 

Mason

Active Member
I know a dozen professional horn players who would respond to that statement by either laughing heartily or scratching their heads in confusion. Of course horns can play legato at loud dynamic levels. There are all kinds of passages that call for slurs at that dynamic. If not a legato patch, where would these kinds of note transitions fit in a library?
Well, ask them then, and get back to us.
Slurs in a horn part actually mean portamento, so if you want normal legato there are no slurs. Many don't know this and get a quirky result because what they wanted was a legato, but the slur had them play portamentos all over the place. Luckily horn players will often know that the composer messed up and play it correctly anyway.
 

Karl Feuerstake

Active Member
I know a dozen professional horn players who would respond to that statement by either laughing heartily or scratching their heads in confusion. Of course horns can play legato at loud dynamic levels. There are all kinds of passages that call for slurs at that dynamic. If not a legato patch, where would these kinds of note transitions fit in a library?
maybe he meant how it would be difficult to perform legato for long at such a dynamic in a solo passage. with an ensemble they can stagger moments of breathing so that the line sounds continous.

i know for tuba and contrabass trombone, once you start going below the bass clef, you'll be lucky to get legato between two notes. it just takes too much air, even at softer dynamics, to really be "useable" in a live setting. sure, sample libraries can record all the two-note transitions, and also give you looped sustains, so you can do whatever you want to your heart's content - but in real life, players have to breathe. if you're playing fff on a long horn line you might have only 2-3 seconds of air with which to slur notes together before needing to inhale again. on tuba or contrabass trombone, at the bottom of your register you may only get 1-1.5 seconds of air.
 

Mason

Active Member
maybe he meant how it would be difficult to perform legato for long at such a dynamic in a solo passage. with an ensemble they can stagger moments of breathing so that the line sounds continous.

i know for tuba and contrabass trombone, once you start going below the bass clef, you'll be lucky to get legato between two notes. it just takes too much air, even at softer dynamics, to really be "useable" in a live setting. sure, sample libraries can record all the two-note transitions, and also give you looped sustains, so you can do whatever you want to your heart's content - but in real life, players have to breathe, and if you're playing fff on a long horn line you might have only 2-3 seconds of air with which to slur notes together before needing to inhale again.
With horn players, from forte up, they will articulate the notes as they must push them out.
 

Mason

Active Member
no they mean slurs. :)

Slurs and legato are two different things as well. e.g. you can write "broad legato tongue" over a part with no slurs.

Sample developers have their own language to describe virtual instruments and unfortunately it sometimes directly contradicts the language you need to use with real musicians.
I think that was what I was trying to say, that slurs and legato are two different things :)