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Working on 4P H3 and 5P H3 (book 3)....

Farkle

Senior Member
And, oh MY GOD, trying to do Scale #11 in 4 part harmony, on a D flat Root Tone, is SO HARD.

It looks like I barfed flat accidentals across the entire page. Checking through the scale numbers is sooo slow. My brain is HURTING. :)

Just wanted to commmiserate with other EIS'ers. The drilling is super important, but man, sometimes it's ROUGH. :)

Mike
 

robh

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Just wait until you get to book 6, polytonal 4P-H4! Just finished that lesson today.

Rob
 

sbkp

Senior Member
Also, it's tons easier to use C# and F# for scales with minor thirds.

So scale 11 in C# would be C# D# E F# G# A# B#. You'd still need an accidental here and there if you write in a (standard) key signature.
 
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Farkle

Farkle

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Also, it's tons easier to use C# and F# for scales with minor thirds.

So scale 11 in C# would be C# D# E F# G# A# B#. You'd still need an accidental here and there if you write in a (standard) key signature.

That makes sense, definitely. But for these drills, Craig is having me stay in D flat. Craig, yer killin me!!
:shock:
 

sbkp

Senior Member
Also, it's tons easier to use C# and F# for scales with minor thirds.

So scale 11 in C# would be C# D# E F# G# A# B#. You'd still need an accidental here and there if you write in a (standard) key signature.

That makes sense, definitely. But for these drills, Craig is having me stay in D flat. Craig, yer killin me!!
:shock:

Really? That's nutty.

It's actually no big deal in Db (#11) – 6 flats for Db vs 6 sharps for C#. But in scale 12 you have Bbb. And in other scales you'll also have other double flats.

And in Gb vs F# (#11) it's Gb Ab Bbb Cb Db Eb F G (5 flats plus a double flat) vs F# G# A B C# D# E# (5 sharps). I know what I'd rather see. :)

Of course you can flip things around as needed for transposing instruments.

Anyway, 4p and 5p H3 is amazing stuff. Enjoy :)
 
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Farkle

Farkle

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Also, it's tons easier to use C# and F# for scales with minor thirds.

So scale 11 in C# would be C# D# E F# G# A# B#. You'd still need an accidental here and there if you write in a (standard) key signature.

That makes sense, definitely. But for these drills, Craig is having me stay in D flat. Craig, yer killin me!!
:shock:

Really? That's nutty.

It's actually no big deal in Db (#11) – 6 flats for Db vs 6 sharps for C#. But in scale 12 you have Bbb. And in other scales you'll also have other double flats.

And in Gb vs F# (#11) it's Gb Ab Bbb Cb Db Eb F G (5 flats plus a double flat) vs F# G# A B C# Dk# E# (5 sharps). I know what I'd rather see. :)

Anyway, 4p and 5p H3 is amazing stuff. Enjoy :)

Ooo, dont quote me on the d flat, I might be misremembering my instructions. And for minor keys I definitely like c shar and f sharp. Anyways, i got thru the drill and am doing some writing now with it It is a super technique for writing agile lush figures!!

Mike
 

jsaras

Active Member
That's unusual. I seem to remember that early on in Book 2 Spud states that C# and F# minor were the preferred options. No one wants to read an F flat or B double-flat.

That said, there is a slightly more devious thing going on. You may recall the early lesson in Book 1 in which you wrote Scale #1 on the root C, Scale #2 on Db, etc. Book 3 is an extension of that...think about it!
 
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Farkle

Farkle

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That's unusual. I seem to remember that early on in Book 2 Spud states that C# and F# minor were the preferred options. No one wants to read an F flat or B double-flat.

That said, there is a slightly more devious thing going on. You may recall the early lesson in Book 1 in which you wrote Scale #1 on the root C, Scale #2 on Db, etc. Book 3 is an extension of that...think about it!

Whoops, you are right! On page 12-A, it says that minor scales with a -3 should use F#, not Gb. And, scales with -2 in them should use C#, not Db.

Again, all to avoid double flats.

Thank you for reminding me of that section, jsaras. All cleared up now!

Mike
 
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