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KEM

Active Member
...just a little one? :) ...I’m not 50+, I’m 60!
Well, a debate about your age should end very quickly, although when I made a similar statement on the last debate thread another 30 pages went by...

See look what you’ve done! Now I have to explain myself!!

 

Garry

Senior Member
Wow, this is such a great thread. Just spent a really enjoyable Saturday morning reading through the posts, and listening to the music. The HZ orchestra playing Angels and Demons is to die for. The OP may have had the desire to work at RC: mine is just to take my son and watch a HZ live concert together. Looks incredible - when is the next one?!

Thanks to Jononotbono for bumping the 4 year old thread, or I would have never seen this. Makes me think a ‘classics thread’ would be a useful sub forum here: a place where threads such as this could be archived, so they are not lost to the mists of time? I wonder what other threads lurk in the VI-C archive that many of us may not have benefitted from at the time?

I’m off to listen to the rest of Angels & Demons...
 
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jononotbono

Luke Johnson
...just a little one? :) ...I’m not 50+, I’m 60!
Haha! But seriously though. I just started using room correction software (Sonarworks) and its changed my world. I apparently have a 12db hump around 100hz which is ridiculous and unbeknownst has always influenced my listening. I just started writing library stuff for Universal and my first track got rejected 6 times due to the mix being top heavy. So I thought I’d give room correction a go. First mix into Sonarworks and it got approved. Which then led onto me listening to 160bpm. It’s a beast. The production is insane. I love it and heard it in such a different way last night.
 

Garry

Senior Member
You should definitely do that. I saw the gig opening night Wembley a couple of years ago. Not too shabby! Haha!
So I just looked it up to see when his next concert is (I missed the 2017 tour :( ), and there’s a ‘tribute’ concert here: http://www.worldofhanszimmer.com/en/ that is endorsed by HZ, though he’s not playing (he’s musical director and curator though).

I don’t know any of the players (my ignorance): can anyone recommend this?
 

Rctec

Senior Member
So I just looked it up to see when his next concert is (I missed the 2017 tour :( ), and there’s a ‘tribute’ concert here: http://www.worldofhanszimmer.com/en/ that is endorsed by HZ, though he’s not playing (he’s musical director and curator though).

I don’t know any of the players (my ignorance): can anyone recommend this?
Gavin Greenaway is conducting... he and Nick Glennie-Smith have done all my scores. Lisa G from Gladiator is singing, Pedro Eustache from my band is playing, and all the other soloists are first rate... and I have worked with the orchestra. I spend a lot of time doing new orchestrations with Steve Mazzaro and Bruce Fowler that are quite different from what we did as a “band”. I didn’t want to repeat myself. This is definitely more orchestral. Originally I thought it would be for small concert-houses, but the tickets started to really sell, so I had to re-think it a bit and tried to make it work as an arena show. Yes, I really hope it’ll work. We’ll see!
 

Garry

Senior Member
Gavin Greenaway is conducting... he and Nick Glennie-Smith have done all my scores. Lisa G from Gladiator is singing, Pedro Eustache from my band is playing, and all the other soloists are first rate... and I have worked with the orchestra. I spend a lot of time doing new orchestrations with Steve Mazzaro and Bruce Fowler that are quite different from what we did as a “band”. I didn’t want to repeat myself. This is definitely more orchestral. Originally I thought it would be for small concert-houses, but the tickets started to really sell, so I had to re-think it a bit and tried to make it work as an arena show. Yes, I really hope it’ll work. We’ll see!
Thanks Hans - that’s all I needed: 2 tickets bought. Can’t wait to see my son’s face!

Any thoughts on when you’ll next tour again yourself?
 

KEM

Active Member
Thanks Hans - that’s all I needed: 2 tickets bought. Can’t wait to see my son’s face!

Any thoughts on when you’ll next tour again yourself?
I hope soon but there better be a St. Louis date!!
 

fretti

Senior Member
...just a little one? :) ...I’m not 50+, I’m 60!
Like a good wine! Matures with age and get exceptional flavors and a great complexity :)
Just like your music I'd say. (Because it is said you like a good glass of wine:)).

P.S.: Hope that isn't seen as offensive towards you:unsure:
 

AlexRuger

Senior Member
Gavin Greenaway is conducting... he and Nick Glennie-Smith have done all my scores. Lisa G from Gladiator is singing, Pedro Eustache from my band is playing, and all the other soloists are first rate... and I have worked with the orchestra. I spend a lot of time doing new orchestrations with Steve Mazzaro and Bruce Fowler that are quite different from what we did as a “band”. I didn’t want to repeat myself. This is definitely more orchestral. Originally I thought it would be for small concert-houses, but the tickets started to really sell, so I had to re-think it a bit and tried to make it work as an arena show. Yes, I really hope it’ll work. We’ll see!
Pedro is potentially the coolest guy I have ever met. Recorded him a couple weeks ago and it was such a blast!
 

dcoscina

Senior Member
So I just looked it up to see when his next concert is (I missed the 2017 tour :( ), and there’s a ‘tribute’ concert here: http://www.worldofhanszimmer.com/en/ that is endorsed by HZ, though he’s not playing (he’s musical director and curator though).

I don’t know any of the players (my ignorance): can anyone recommend this?
I unfortunately missed HZ when he came to Toronto last August but was delighted to discover the Prague concert on Netflix just recently. While it can’t compare to the live experience, I really enjoyed the production value and the way the music was arranged for live performance. I had the biggest goofiest grin on my face when I heard the clarinet line from Driving Miss Daisy which opened the show. Love that score to this day.
 

jbstanley

New Member
Have really enjoyed reading some of this thread - really neat to hear about some of the work that went into HZ's live show. I was not able to see it in person, but was able to watch it on Netflix (which doesn't do it justice), but it was phenomenal.

Just recently wrapped production for a stage show in which they wanted to bring cinema to the stage - full orchestra, rhythm section, choir and lots and lots of percussion. Was really fun to bring together and I was inspired by watching the HZ live show. Did a bit of a "salute" to what I observed in Hans' production work in combining electric guitars with an orchestra among other things. I've always been inspired by his work (especially the percussive side of things as I always love creating gigantic percussive works with an orchestra - as a drummer turned composer it's a blast).

Wanted to share a snippet of the final - the total length of this piece is 12 minutes, but the sample is only about 3. Very diverse movements that had to be tied together - it was a stretch, but man was it fun. Thanks for the inspiration Hans.

Hope you guys enjoy...the link is below.

 

bengoss

Member
The question was about working at RCP. And that's in Los Angeles. (One of my first tests for future candidates has always been: can you actually find us?)

No, I didn't start in Germany. I could never get a job there since I hadn't gone to music school, and they wanted to see references from an Akademie.

I was playing in bands in England - pups, colleges, workingmen's clubs, strip-joints. Always late with the rent, and worse - always ran out of shillings for the electricity meter. Makes it a bit hard on the electronic wunderwerk when it all gets dark in the middle of a riff.
Lived mainly off the kindness of friends (it is important, as a musician, to be entertaining enough that people take you out on a regular basis for expensive dinners.) always owed the bank money - but the bank manager sort of believed in me, and let me overdraw. Borrowed synth from the good people at Argent's Keyboards and Syco Systems. Fell in with the jingle crowd, which was a regular check (I used to do two or three a week, sometimes as a composer, sometimes as a synth programmer for other composers)
Started working with an equally poor Trevor Horn and Geoff Downes. Made a song we couldn't give away. Went to number one the week before my twenty-first birthday. Still waiting for the royalties.
Got fed up with the world of rock 'n' roll. Started working with Stanley Myers (The Deerhunter) as his assistant. He showed me how the orchestra worked, I made excellent espresso. Fair deal.
It was actually quite good not to be on the road anymore. I used every second to get better with equipment. I would loiter at the studio after I was done with my session and learn from engineers like Geoff Emerick, Flood, Hugh Padgham (actually, he was the bass player in my first band).

Build a studio in London with Stanley. It was tiny, but sounded great. Soul To Soul, a lot of KLF and other experimental stuff, endless disco...learned what a "hook" is. Beethoven knew...Mozart and the Stones knew...

And the commercial directors where starting to make TV movies. Our friends Tim Bevan and Sarah Radcliffe started a film company called "Working Title". No money, but a vision. Suddenly we where doing movies. Our movies where edgy and funny and usually under-financed before we even started. Mostly cut above strip joints or brothels in London's Soho. It was all just a different form of the world of entertainment, and the rent was cheap. Still owed the bank a fortune. I kept telling them that a synth could buy a house, not the other way round. That One idea, One tune would make the difference between ruin and being able to pay the banks back. And since I had no other qualifications, they didn't really have a choice.
But I knew my stuff. It was limited - I was into electronica - but I could go up to any synth, any mixing console and work with it. I never took a day off. I was glued to all the synthporn magazines, hung out for years at Syco systems, who sold the Fairlight and the Linn, and eventually was offered a movie in L.A.
And while we - due to lack of money - had really made what little technology we had (ok, i had a Fairlight by then...don't ask how we got it or paid for it. sometimes you have to be lucky. thank You, Stanley Kubrick!) work for us brilliantly, Hollywood wasn't at all the technological fab place I imagined it to be. It was very talented people writing on paper, with their arrangers and orchestrators in some dingy back room with neon lighting and cottage cheese ceilings. Not really my thing. Stained, cracked linoleum floors and water-damaged ceilings (" but thats where Orson Wells cut 'Citizen Kane'!" "yeah, great, but can you at least change the lightbulb?") So I build myself another studio and other people wanted to be part of it, like Mark Mancina, Harry G-W, John Powell...and because we had all that rather cool, yet primitive technology, directors actually liked coming over and hearing mock-ups of a score, discuss the music to picture without a hundred piece orchestra waiting outside. And we had an excellent drinks cupboard.

But the main thing was - we all had an insane work ethic (I remember feeling guilty leaving at 4am one morning, because everybody else's car was still there.). We surrounded ourselves with the greatest music editors like Adam Smalley and Bob Badami (look up their credits!) and changed their way of working to be more like record producers. We got recording engineers like Alan Meyerson, who could effortlessly move between orchestra and fuzz-box.

If we had an idea, we'd build it. We still build our own samplers, put unfair pressure onto companies like Steinberg and Avid (Logic is too corporate now. It's not how long it took to get this last update. When do you think the next one is coming out?)

We very much worked like a firm of architects. One main designer, with us all helping each other out. People are still confused about the "additional music" credits. If it sounds like me, it's probably me. Head Architect. But how can my collaborators ever get a career going if they are just "Ghosts"? If it sounds like John Powell, it's probably him...same rules apply.
Personally, I couldn't give a flying [email protected]&$ about credits. I'm in it for the process. That's the part I love. I have a deal with one film company where they pay me next to nothing for the music, but a shitload of money for doing press. Press is hard work, parties scare the living day lights out of me, and premieres are only great for being in amongst a big audience for whom, ultimately we made it, and enjoying the movie with them. The party after is just some sort of Irish wake, where we say good bye to the joy we had making the thing.
The only thing between you and a career is singleminded stubbornness, hard work and sweat, tempered with social graces and a true compassion for your poor director, good ideas, recklessness, humility and an insane work ethic. You have to have talent in all of these fields, plus, obviously, music and story telling. You need to be a proud servant of the film, and be respectful and a little bit in love with and of your audience. I'm not big on awards. They usually get it wrong. "Shawshank Redemtion" should have won the Oscar, in my opinion. My learned and generous peers obviously had a different opinion and gave it to me for "Lionking". Made no difference to my career, or the trajectory I was on.
The only true compliment I feel is, when someone goes out and spends their hard earned money on one of my movies or soundtrack. Real people, who have a choice, wanting to be entertained and moved and think i can do that. The only thing I'm interested in is that I'm having some weird ongoing dialogue through my music with people I've never met, who are moved or provoked by my music, that something from my heart resonates with their emotion or brain - all over the world, whatever culture. And I'm interested that some guy with no education from Frankfurt can make it in Hollywood. Because that means anybody can.
-Hz-
Such an old post, was wondering if anyone had luck with “can you actually find us” @Rctec :) ?
I am in LA right now, visiting from NYC and wanted so badly to visit remote control for an informational interview and learn as much as I can while there.
I did send an email couple of weeks ago - no response..
I found RC, asked who should I talk to and they just told me that this is a private property and they are not able to introduce me to anyone..
I did call today and they also told me that there is no way of talking to anyone or visiting.
So definitely can you actually find us has a different meaning:))
If anyone has an advice, I would appreciate it a lot.

Thank you,
Ben
 

miket

Senior Member
It's like converting to Judaism. You have to ask three times.

(Sorry, obviously I don't have any useful advice, much as I'd like to for both our benefit)
 
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bengoss

Member
It's like converting to Judaism. You have to ask three times.

(Sorry, obviously I don't have any useful advice, much as I'd like to for both our benefit)
Lol, thank you anyways!
Hope someone here works at RC and kind enough to respond.

B
 
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