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Windows 10 update

Discussion in 'Your DAW (Digital Audio Workstation)' started by Gzu, Jun 13, 2018.

  1. Gzu

    Gzu Senior Member

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    Dec 11, 2013
    Hello everyone !

    Do you guys update windows 10 regularly, in your master and slave computers ?
    I mean, even if your DAW and VEP is performing quite good, do you update, or avoid doing updates ?
    I'm afraid if I update my windows 10 master and slave computers, compability issues may appear, and the overall performance become compromised.

    What do you guys think ?

    Thank you so much!
     
  2. Fugdup

    Fugdup Member Of The Year

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    Sep 13, 2013
    Norway
    I don't update until it forces me to, or unless there's a really specific bug i know is fixed, or a quality-of-life update confirmed not to mess audio stuff up.
     
    AlexRuger likes this.
  3. John Judd

    John Judd Active Member

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    Aug 13, 2015
    I occasionally get the security updates. As long as the rig is working, I try to leave it alone and change as few things as possible. Not sure if this is a good or bad idea, to be honest.
     
  4. Quasar

    Quasar Senior Member

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    Jun 26, 2012
    I'm still on (a not recently updated) W7, in part because of Microsoft's bi-annual feature updates for "Windows as a service" crapola. For when I rebuild, I already have a media installation USB for 1709, just before the Spectre/Meltdown stuff, and will just have to configure version compatibility when the time comes.

    But I keep the machine offline, and never do Windows Updates on the workstation just to "stay current", which is only necessary if your PC is subjected to the chaotic and unpredictable vulnerabilities of the internet.
     
  5. OP
    OP
    Gzu

    Gzu Senior Member

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    Dec 11, 2013
    Mine is offline too, both master and slave.

    I only connect them to get the most recent updates, but , im not sure if that is very healthy, when you have a all the OS working flawlessly.
    That's why I'm trying to get feedback from different people.
    I did a lot of tweaking in my Windows 10, and that's one of the reasons that make me wonder if it's really necessary to get the most recent updates.
     
  6. Midihead

    Midihead Senior Member

    It's always important to update Windows if you're connected to the internet. Anymore it's difficult not to be. A solution for you may be antivirus for your router (rather than your computer).
    https://windowsreport.com/antivirus-router-security/

    Windows 10 updates quite frequently and I am annoyed by the kinds of "services" that get automatically turned back on (if you've disabled them). That in addition to new crapola Windows 10 keeps adding. Even still, it's not affected my audio work. I think we have less to worry about here than our OSX bretheren do, even with all the annoyances.
     
  7. Quasar

    Quasar Senior Member

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    Well, my feedback is that if your rigs are offline, then it's absolutely 100% unnecessary. That is, at least until at least such time as you add a program that requires a newer build, which wouldn't be more often than once every several years under typical circumstances.

    With most hardware: toasters, power drills, washing machines et al, no one even considers that one's "version" is obsolete because they've come out with a new one. Your washer either washes your clothes or it does not. It's ONLY the internet that makes the whole exhausting and often dysfunctional cycles of constant OS change necessary.

    The old, inexpensive computer I'm typing on now runs Windows 10, I let the updates happen automatically, stay current and don't worry about it, because it's just a web browsing machine. But why anyone would want to take a production workstation and constantly subject it to those same cycles is way, way beyond my ability to even fathom.
     
  8. DavidY

    DavidY Senior Member

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    Nov 24, 2017
    UK
    One problem with Windows 10 is that versions drop out of support within a couple of years. So if you installed the first version of Windows 10, in July 2015, that version (and I think the two following versions from November 2015 and July 2016) are already out of support and in theory won't get patches and updates. It's a bit different for corporations but the direction of travel is the same. Whereas Windows 8.1 for instance is supported until 2023.

    So if you want to stay on a supported version of Windows 10 you have to deal with the big "feature updates" which are essentially a whole new version.

    My strategy is to use Windows 10 Pro, which gives more control on when I get the updates, basically to defer as long as possible. Then update it myself using the Media Creation Tool on a day I choose (eg. when not in the middle of something critical) having taken a full backup so I can rollback if it doesn't work for some reason.
     
  9. Grizzlymv

    Grizzlymv Senior Member

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    Apr 12, 2016
    Canada
    If I'm not mistaken, Microsoft support the current version and the previous one. That's it. Then you're kind of forced to upgrade. I tried various way to "disable" the updates and do it myself when I judge it's an appropriate time, but it's impossible. Microsoft really wants to have full control over the update cycle. So even if you disable things, they will magically be reenabled. If you keep your computer offline, thats fine, but as soon as you'll put it online for a library update or something, you'll get the windows update enforced on your next reboot, planned or not . I just hate their way of doing things nowadays. And I'm an IT guy in my day life... Tonight I went to work in the studio, but Microsoft decided otherwise for me... its update time. Like it or not. Thanks MS...
     
  10. michelsimons

    michelsimons Senior Member

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    Jan 24, 2018
    Delft
    I get my Windows 10 updates from the company that built my laptop. This way I can still update it without having automatic updates (which they disabled) mess up the settings they applied for DAW use. I have a dual boot system. The DAW boot is mostly offline. I only go online when something needs to be installed/updated through one of those tools some developers provide for that purpose and never (with a single exception when I first installed everything anew) use it for browsing the internet.
     
  11. Przemek K.

    Przemek K. Senior Member

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    I was wondering if any of you use this application for win 10: https://www.oo-software.com/en/shutup10
    It seems you can disable almost anything with this software and probably even the automatic updates. But its only my guess. The other possibility I read at some point was to use a metered connection, but I can't remember if its possible on win 10 pro, or if its only working for the home version.
     
  12. DavidY

    DavidY Senior Member

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    Nov 24, 2017
    UK
    I think at the moment there are 3 versions in support. But there may well have been times when only 2 were in support.
    https://support.microsoft.com/en-gb/help/13853/windows-lifecycle-fact-sheet

    I think metered connection is an option on Home as well - for one thing if you really have a metered connection it would be a problem on Home machines if Win10 uses up all your bandwidth allowance.

    Win10 Pro (as long as you have a recent Win10 version ;) ) gives more control - you can explicitly defer "feature updates" for up to 365 days. It's not forever but as mentioned I use this to defer until such time as I have some spare time to do an update, and potentially deal with consequences if it goes wrong - for instance having a backup or two before I start.
     
    Przemek K. likes this.

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