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Why the heck did NI... ???

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Ben H

Senior Member
WAV files and AIFF still work... They need to, so that you can still build Kontakt instruments.

It's just anything else like GIGA, or AKAI, or SF2, or EXS, or any other previously supported formats.
 
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Josh Richman

Active Member
WAV files and AIFF still work... They need to, so that you can still build Kontakt instruments.

It's just anything else like SFZ, or EXS, or any other previously supported formats.
Ouch why? This would only mean less sampled instruments can be made for the platform...
 
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Ben H

Senior Member
Ouch why? This would only mean less sampled instruments can be made for the platform...
I think the reason they have done it is to try and lock developers out of developing for other non-Kontakt formats.

Because people would originally create their libraries in other samplers first and then save them in Kontakt as a final format.

Now I think they're hoping that people wont develop in other formats because it is too much work to build separate non-Kontakt instruments.

Stuff can't be converted FROM Kontakt format because it's locked down, and now stuff also can't be converted TO Kontakt (with Kontakt at least).

They're purposefully trying to make it inconvenient and too much of a hassle for developers to release multiformat libraries, so that they abandon creating libraries for platforms other than Kontakt, IMHO.
 

hawpri

Active Member
Won't it always be possible to keep doing this in older versions of Kontakt 5, and then open that .nki in K6, which would circumvent this whole idea? Obviously as time goes on fewer and fewer people will be using older versions of Kontakt until most won't have this option available, but that will be years from now.
 

Quasar

Senior Member
Just another example, like the malware Native Access, of monopolistic abuse of power. NI sickens me.
 
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Ben H

Senior Member
@hawpri, that is the whole point. Progressively Kontakt is becoming less and less open, but now people are too far invested in it with libraries and workflow and whatnot to be able to move away from it.

They slowly locked it down starting with 4.2 by making the NKIs use a binary non-human readble format, slowly closing it off, and now it's progressively aggressively becoming more and more proprietary.
 
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Ben H

Senior Member
@Saxer, that's very true. They're trying to force deveopers' hands, thinking no one will resist, but they're pushing them away. Same as Steinberg, with this whole discontinuing VST 2 thing.
 

X-Bassist

Senior Member
it's sad to say, but perhaps the time for separate VST samplers for bigger developers has begun and will continue to grow. It may make things more complex, and will probably make more people stick to less developers (driving out smaller ones). But I don't think NI cares, until their software sales start to take a nosedive. Than they'll have to start over. "We support more formats for Kontakt 9!"
 

EvilDragon

KSP Wizard
3rd party sampler format import has nothing to do with developing libraries for Kontakt, really.

Because people would originally create their libraries in other samplers first and then save them in Kontakt as a final format.
When was this "originally"? 10 years ago? Most any Kontakt developer you see on today's market doesn't use any of the old sampler formats to do their development, at all. Not sure where you got this idea from.

They slowly locked it down starting with 4.2 by making the NKIs use a binary non-human readble format
NKI format wasn't human-readable even before 4.2, you needed special tools to unpack them. Kontakt's format was never really "open", in the true sense of the word.

They're purposefully trying to make it inconvenient and too much of a hassle for developers to release multiformat libraries
Incorrect. Plus, how many developers total are making multiformat libraries? Can they be counted on two hands? Out of, what, hundreds of existing developers? Let's be realistic here.

Also, you don't know how the decision was made so you cannot claim anything was done "purposefully". There can be any number of reasons that are more realistic than the one you mention.

Won't it always be possible to keep doing this in older versions of Kontakt 5, and then open that .nki in K6
Of course that will always be possible.
 
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Lindon

VST/AU Developer
I think the reason they have done it is to try and lock developers out of developing for other non-Kontakt formats.

Because people would originally create their libraries in other samplers first and then save them in Kontakt as a final format.

Now I think they're hoping that people wont develop in other formats because it is too much work to build separate non-Kontakt instruments.

Stuff can't be converted FROM Kontakt format because it's locked down, and now stuff also can't be converted TO Kontakt (with Kontakt at least).

They're purposefully trying to make it inconvenient and too much of a hassle for developers to release multiformat libraries, so that they abandon creating libraries for platforms other than Kontakt, IMHO.
Honestly the audio file formats are the least of our worries when we are doing cross-product development.
 

thereus

Active Member
it's sad to say, but perhaps the time for separate VST samplers for bigger developers has begun and will continue to grow. It may make things more complex, and will probably make more people stick to less developers (driving out smaller ones). But I don't think NI cares, until their software sales start to take a nosedive. Than they'll have to start over. "We support more formats for Kontakt 9!"
Yeah...

...but which of those bigger developers is going to put the investment into proper memory management?
 

Lindon

VST/AU Developer
...memory management never goes away but thats not the big mountain at the start - that's stuff like disk streaming/buffering etc.
 
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