What's your preferred library for bass/cello pizz?

Michael Stibor

Senior Member
I currently have CSS, LASS, VSL SE, and BHCT. And yet I struggle to get any of the libraries to create that film style John Williams type bass pizzicato plume that cuts through a mix without sounding overly boomy. I'll be the first to admit that it could be my poor excuse for mixing. But I am curious if anyone uses something for low end pizzicato sounds that just sit right "straight out of the box".
 

lettucehat

Active Member
It's not for everybody but Adagio/Adagietto/Anthology's pizzicatos have been mine for years. It wasn't until I started hearing the pizz options in other libraries that I realized they were particularly crisp. Not necessarily realistic though. I've also liked SCS/Loegria/SSS but I've had to hype the highs sometimes.
 

borisb2

Senior Member
I once tested and compared bass pizz from CSS, LASS, HWS, SStS, EWQLSO and others.

It seemd that only the EWQLSO gives me that nice saturated attack without sounding too boomy - so thats my go to, it cuts perfectly through a mix.
 

muk

Senior Member
Tough one! If it has to be out of the box, maybe Spitfire Chamber Strings. There are some bad samples in it though, some noises, out of tune samples etc. Quality control unfortunately hasn't done their best job on these in my opinion. VSL Synchron Strings is another options. The pizzes are a bit muddy, but certainly useable. What I would use in such a case is a group of layered Berlin Strings Solo Bass samples.

I posted a short pizzicato comparison with various libraries here:


You might not be interested in all the blurb I wrote in that thread, in which case just the audio examples may be of use to you.
 
OP
Michael Stibor

Michael Stibor

Senior Member
I once tested and compared bass pizz from CSS, LASS, HWS, SStS, EWQLSO and others.

It seemd that only the EWQLSO gives me that nice saturated attack without sounding too boomy - so thats my go to, it cuts perfectly through a mix.
Interesting. I always forget about EWQLSO. I’ll check it out!
 
OP
Michael Stibor

Michael Stibor

Senior Member
Tough one! If it has to be out of the box, maybe Spitfire Chamber Strings. There are some bad samples in it though, some noises, out of tune samples etc. Quality control unfortunately hasn't done their best job on these in my opinion. VSL Synchron Strings is another options. The pizzes are a bit muddy, but certainly useable. What I would use in such a case is a group of layered Berlin Strings Solo Bass samples.

I posted a short pizzicato comparison with various libraries here:


You might not be interested in all the blurb I wrote in that thread, in which case just the audio examples may be of use to you.
Awesome thank you. I will check it out!
 

Bighill

New Member
I currently have CSS, LASS, VSL SE, and BHCT. And yet I struggle to get any of the libraries to create that film style John Williams type bass pizzicato plume that cuts through a mix without sounding overly boomy. I'll be the first to admit that it could be my poor excuse for mixing. But I am curious if anyone uses something for low end pizzicato sounds that just sit right "straight out of the box".
Syncron Strings have wonderful pizzicati.....
 

DSmolken

Senior Member
For ensemble pizz, I'll throw a wrench in the works: didn't those now-deleted Nashville demos have some very nice pizz that people were saying is better than any other pizz out there, and weren't we promised more news on that very soon? Might be worth waiting to check out the low strings in that.
 

barteredbride

Hello and hola...a Brit in Spain
For ensemble pizz, I'll throw a wrench in the works: didn't those now-deleted Nashville demos have some very nice pizz that people were saying is better than any other pizz out there, and weren't we promised more news on that very soon? Might be worth waiting to check out the low strings in that.
I love VI Control ! Someone asks what their favourite pizz is, and they get the answer of the pizz from a deleted demo, of an unreleased library that someone else heard and said was amazing.

:laugh: :laugh: :):thumbsup::laugh:


Ps...i know you were throwing in a wrench there on purpose :thumbsup:
 

Living Fossil

Senior Member
And yet I struggle to get any of the libraries to create that film style John Williams type bass pizzicato plume that cuts through a mix without sounding overly boomy.
In classical (postromantic) instrumentation often when you "hear" bass pizzicati, there is more to it.
Very often bassoon staccati are used, which aren't that much audible on their own but add substance.
(Also consider a contrabassoon for a lower octave. Staccati in the bass clarinet are also bend very well)

And of course, the low notes of the harp have lots of power and blend well too.

In 20th century instrumentation you can find sometimes also the piano used to enforce the pizzicati.
However, you have to find the right dynamic range. If too loud, the piano gets obvious due to the immense power of its high overtones. (so i'd rather keep them around a normal forte level. It's better not to hear it then to hear it too loud)

Also consider to reinforce low notes by doubling them in octaves.

Personally i think all the usual suspects among string libraries will do the job.

ps. if the passage isn't too fast you can also consider staccati in the tuba.
But not louder than mf.
 
OP
Michael Stibor

Michael Stibor

Senior Member
In classical (postromantic) instrumentation often when you "hear" bass pizzicati, there is more to it.
Very often bassoon staccati are used, which aren't that much audible on their own but add substance.
(Also consider a contrabassoon for a lower octave. Staccati in the bass clarinet are also bend very well)

And of course, the low notes of the harp have lots of power and blend well too.

In 20th century instrumentation you can find sometimes also the piano used to enforce the pizzicati.
However, you have to find the right dynamic range. If too loud, the piano gets obvious due to the immense power of its high overtones. (so i'd rather keep them around a normal forte level. It's better not to hear it then to hear it too loud)

Also consider to reinforce low notes by doubling them in octaves.

Personally i think all the usual suspects among string libraries will do the job.

ps. if the passage isn't too fast you can also consider staccati in the tuba.
But not louder than mf.
Thank you for this. I was considering the idea that perhaps the reason my low pizzicato didn’t sound like the pros was that maybe there were other element such as contrabassoon and harp. I’ll look into it more. :)
 
OP
Michael Stibor

Michael Stibor

Senior Member
I love VI Control ! Someone asks what their favourite pizz is, and they get the answer of the pizz from a deleted demo, of an unreleased library that someone else heard and said was amazing.

:laugh: :laugh: :):thumbsup::laugh:


Ps...i know you were throwing in a wrench there on purpose :thumbsup:
No it’s cool. I’m not in a rush. So if it’s waiting for a new program, that’s coming out shortly that’s worth it, I don’t mind. :)
 

ProfoundSilence

Senior Member
honestly sometimes its doubled with synths in the modern world, but OG composer often used other instruments to thicken subtlety it needed - but the key is to keep all the dynamics down in general.