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What is Reaper bad at?

EvilDragon

KSP Wizard
Yes, you get ReaPack first, which is a package manager. You can install stuff on your network computer and just copy the Scripts folder from Reaper's resource folder (there's an action to open it, search Action list for "resource path") over to your DAW computer.
 

Fredeke

Active Member
Yes, you get ReaPack first, which is a package manager. You can install stuff on your network computer and just copy the Scripts folder from Reaper's resource folder (there's an action to open it, search Action list for "resource path") over to your DAW computer.
Great! I'll get to it, as soon as I can spare the patience and concentration. Thanks again.
 

rudi

Member
@Fredeke in my short time with Reaper I found that there are many, many options and at times it can be overwhelming.

I started simply and gradually went deeper into customising Reaper.

Backup your current configuration
You may already know this, but before anything else I would backup your current configuration:

1) Select the Option menu
2) Select Preferences
3) From the Preferences dialog box:
4) Click on the first option on the left: General
5) On the panel on the right click on Export Configuration - a list of all the configuration items will appear after a few seconds
6) Click on Save
7) A file selection box will appear - enter a filename for your backup e.g "My Config Backup 01"
8) Click on Save and your current config will be saved so you can always revert back to it. For extra safety I tend to save mine in my user document folders.


Install a simple theme
I would start with a simple theme to get a feel for it.
My system is Windows 10, so I don't know if the following steps work the same way on MacOS:

1) Go to:
https://stash.reaper.fm/tag/Themes

2) Select a theme you like the look of e.g
https://stash.reaper.fm/theme/2293/JanneVThemes.zip

3) Find the file you downloaded, and unzip it
4) inside the unzipped folder you'll find two files:

JanneV.ReaperThemeZip
JanneV2.ReaperThemeZip

4) Next open Reaper
5) Drag one of the files above onto the Reaper window
6) Reaper will automatically install the file for you and change theme

Switching Themes
To switch between installed themes:

1) Select the Options menu
2) Select the Themes entry
3) You should see a list of installed themes
4) Select one
5) That's it

Where does Reaper store its Theme files?
Reaper makes a copy of any new theme it installs automatically.
To find the location on your machine:

1) Select the Options menu
2) Select the Show REAPER resource path in explorer/finder...
3) Explorer / Finder will open that location
4) There should be a folder called ColorThemes - that's where the theme files are stored
5) You can install themes manually by copying them to that folder directly and using the Switching Themes steps above to select them

I hope that helps as a start. Let us know how you get on :)
 
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rudi

Member
Thanks for the kind words. I'm always pleased and a little surprised when people say they're looking at Reaper because of Reaticulate. Hope it works out for you, and feel free to ask on thread if you have any questions. The usability will eventually improve once I finally finish the bank editor GUI. :)
Thank you for the link. I was indeed very impressed with your work, and wishing it were available as a Cubase plugin :).

I went a bit crazy with all the sales/deals available recently (Albion II, Spitfire Chamber Strings, Noire Piano, Blackhole) my credit card needs a wee rest until the end of the month!

I have also been getting to grips with Reaper (like any DAW there are plenty of "how do I..." moments) but I am rapidly finding my feet and using customised shortcuts for those commands ingrained in my fingers in Cubase (F3 -> Mixer).

I intend on using your plugin - I like the way it is organised into libraries, and it's clear GUI (esp. compared to the expression maps in Cubase and Dorico). Thank you for all your hard work!!
 

Fredeke

Active Member
@Fredeke in my short time with Reaper I found that there are many, many options and at times it can be overwhelming.

I started simply and gradually went deeper into customising Reaper.

Backup your current configuration
You may already know this, but before anything else I would backup your current configuration:

1) Select the Option menu
2) Select Preferences
3) From the Preferences dialog box:
4) Click on the first option on the left: General
5) On the panel on the right click on Export Configuration - a list of all the configuration items will appear after a few seconds
6) Click on Save
7) A file selection box will appear - enter a filename for your backup e.g "My Config Backup 01"
8) Click on Save and your current config will be saved so you can always revert back to it. For extra safety I tend to save mine in my user document folders.


Install a simple theme
I would start with a simple theme to get a feel for it.
My system is Windows 10, so I don't know if the following steps work the same way on MacOS:

1) Go to:
https://stash.reaper.fm/tag/Themes

2) Select a theme you like the look of e.g
https://stash.reaper.fm/theme/2293/JanneVThemes.zip

3) Find the file you downloaded, and unzip it
4) inside the unzipped folder you'll find two files:

JanneV.ReaperThemeZip
JanneV2.ReaperThemeZip

4) Next open Reaper
5) Drag the one of the files above onto the Reaper window
6) Reaper will automatically install the file for you and change theme

Switching Themes
To switch between installed themes:

1) Select the Options menu
2) Select the Themes entry
3) You should see a list of installed themes
4) Select one
5) That's it

Where does Reaper store its Theme files?
Reaper makes a copy of any new theme it install automatically.
To find the location on your machine:

1) Select the Options menu
2) Select the Show REAPER resource path in explorer/finder...
3) Explorer / Finder will open that location
4) There should be a folder called ColorThemes - that's where the theme files are stored
5) You can install themes manually by copying them to that folder directly and using the Switching Themes steps above to select them

I hope that helps as a start. Let us know how you get on :)
Thanks a lot. I'll follow those steps.

(I'm an unrepenting Windowsian myself - or rather, a repented Appler, but that's another story)
 
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tack

Damned Dirty Ape
like any DAW there are plenty of "how do I..." moments
I think the interesting thing about Reaper is that those "how do I do X" questions, once you appreciate Reaper's flexibility, naturally evolve into "how do I make Reaper work like Y." This is a rather sharp double-edged sword, especially if you're a relatively sophisticated user (for instance not afraid of some scripting), because whereas with other DAWs you figure X out and you move onto music, with Reaper there is a greater danger of devising highly customized Ys. And once you know a thing to be possible, with a bit of elbow grease, you spend a lot more time making it behave according to the workflow you have in your head, rather than making the music you have in your head.

At least this is the trap I regularly fall into. Fortunately I can afford to let myself fall into that trap, because this is my hobby rather than paying my bills. I have fun with it in any case.
 
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Fredeke

Active Member
I think the interesting thing about Reaper is that those "how do I do X" questions, once you appreciate Reaper's flexibility, naturally evolve into "how do I make Reaper work like Y." This is a rather sharp double-edged sword, especially if you're a relatively sophisticated user (for instance not afraid of some scripting), because whereas with other DAWs you figure X out and you move onto music, with Reaper there is a greater danger of devising highly customized Ys and once you know a thing to be possible. And with a bit of elbow grease, you spend a lot more time making it behave according to the workflow you have in your head, rather than making the music you have in your head.

At least this is the trap I regularly fall into. Fortunately I can afford to let myself fall into that trap, because this is my hobby rather than paying my bills. I have fun with it in any case.
I find the perspective both appealing and scary ;)
 
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MatFluor

Senior Member
That's the reason I initially didn't go with reaper and stayed away for quite some time.

Since I am still a programmer/scientific researcher to pay my bills, I felt that if I get reaper, I wouldn't make music, but instead, get sucked into creating workflow optimization for a workflow not there yet.

The turning point for me personally was when OTR by storyteller went the donationware route. I got it, embraced the philosophy of the workflow he lined out, and applied some tweaks. I still from time to time optimize my workflow, but I have a solid jumping off point now - to maximize my productivity, while keeping me a backdoor for some scripts should I need them :)

That little story aside - the literally only thing that I still miss in reaper is this:
DP style VI-Racks. I work with VEP, and when you work with subprojects for a film or other uses, and your subprojects employ VEP - it's a hassle to switch between subprojects since a VEP instance only accepts a connection from one plugin at a time. DP handled that with those VI-Racks, which were "above" the chunks (subprojects so to speak), meaning all chunks would use the stuff in those VI-Racks - hence only one connection. With Reaper, each subproject is its own, encapsulated entity. Which has advantages (every reaper projects can be dragged into a master project and become a subproject). But when I want to switch, I have to either disable all VEP plugins before I do or close the subprojects.

That's what I currently "struggle" with. Yes, I've written some custom actions etc that disable the plugins before I switch to another subproject tab (Reaper FTW in that regard again) - but apparently, there is no other way to do that.
 

artmanjam

New Member
I came across this comparison of ReaEQ and Pro-Q3 a few weeks ago...It makes for a rather interesting listening ;)
Really interesting and detailed analytic comparison :)
I was talking about Vienna Suite EQ as it's very similar to ReaEQ, a simpel EQ with no extra features. The main difference is the Q, way narrower in VS EQ, which allows to achieve a better result on undesired frequencies.

That said, and to get back to the thread, I'm considering some surface control for Reaper and what I've read until now doesn't help me that much. Looks like Reaper setup is not that easy, am I wrong, any idea about?
 

MexicanBreed

New Member
Really interesting and detailed analytic comparison :)
I was talking about Vienna Suite EQ as it's very similar to ReaEQ, a simpel EQ with no extra features. The main difference is the Q, way narrower in VS EQ, which allows to achieve a better result on undesired frequencies.

That said, and to get back to the thread, I'm considering some surface control for Reaper and what I've read until now doesn't help me that much. Looks like Reaper setup is not that easy, am I wrong, any idea about?
I got a cheap Faderport v1 from ebay afew months back. One of the reasons that made me go for it is that there is a specially tweaked driver for it written by some members of the Reaper forums.
 

rudi

Member
Really interesting and detailed analytic comparison :)
That said, and to get back to the thread, I'm considering some surface control for Reaper and what I've read until now doesn't help me that much. Looks like Reaper setup is not that easy, am I wrong, any idea about?
I am on day 42 of my 60 evaluation license of Reaper, so I am not the best qualified person to chip in, but I looked-up Reaper automation on the web and I am quite impressed by how simple it is (once you know how to do it, like most DAWs or notation programs ;))

Set your MIDI device as a controller
Your MIDI keyboard/control surface needs to be set as a control device.
(I use an Oxygen 61 keyboard with sliders, knobs and switches)

1) Make sure your MIDI device is plugged in
2) In Reaper select the Options menu
3) Select Preferences - the preferences panel will appear
4) Scroll down on the left panel to Audio Devices
5) On the the right side MIDI Input panel select your MIDI device
6) Make sure that both the options for:
"Enable input from this device" and
"Enable input for control messages" are checked.

Reaper is now set-up to let you use your MIDI device as a controller.

Assign Reaper commands to your MIDI device
To assign a command to respond to your MIDI controller - e.g to assign the Play button on your device to the Play command in Reaper:

1) From the Actions menu select Show Action List, or type the ? shortcut
2) Enter the name of the command you want to control:

e.g "transport play"
(it doesn't have to be the literral command, just a few keywords)

3) Select Transport: Play
(there are several variations depending on whether you want to use the button as a just Play or a Play/Stop toggle, or make the cursor to return to its previous position on Stop etc.)

4) Click Add
5) Press the control you want to use on your MIDI device
6) Press OK
7) Test it works
8) Repeat as needed

This works for buttons, knobs and sliders.

I hope that helps.


Here are some useful links:

There are lots of Youtube videos on that subject, particularly by Kenny Gioia:

Transport


Sliders


There is also one using the Faderport V1

 

rudi

Member
Since I am still a programmer/scientific researcher to pay my bills, I felt that if I get reaper, I wouldn't make music, but instead, get sucked into creating workflow optimization for a workflow not there yet.
Like several other users here I fall into the same category - music is a wonderful (and expensive) hobby for me at the moment, but one I hugely enjoy.

With Reaper there is a huge temptation to dive in and make it do things exactly the way you want it to do it - which is both a strength and a possible distraction. Maybe a bit like Linux vs Windows or MacOS... Linuxes can be used as they are, but you can also customise them ad-infinitum :shocked:
 

rudi

Member
(I'm an unrepenting Windowsian myself - or rather, a repented Appler, but that's another story)
I always cast an envious eye towards Apple's hardware, but the cost of their PCs, especially here in Europe makes it hard to justify. Another factor is the way Apple makes it difficult to upgrade your hardware. If I made a living out of my music I'd definitely switch over.
 

Fredeke

Active Member
I always cast an envious eye towards Apple's hardware, but the cost of their PCs, especially here in Europe makes it hard to justify. Another factor is the way Apple makes it difficult to upgrade your hardware. If I made a living out of my music I'd definitely switch over.
Here's my (possibly biased) impression: while Apple Macs have become less reliable since the passing of Steve Jobs, Microsoft Windows has become more reliable since the departure of Bill Gates. At the present, I consider them of equivalent quality. For example, I had just as many glitches on my 2015 Macbook Pro (while I had none with my 2005 one), and I could achieve the same latencies with Windows 10 out of the box, last year. I'm still using the same audio interface btw. If that trend continues, by the time you'll want to get a Mac, it probably won't be worth the steep expense anymore. (Unless you really want to use Apple-specific software, like Logic or Final Cut, and assuming they remain as good as they are now.)

Apparently I'm not alone:
 
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rudi

Member
... Microsoft Windows has become more reliable since the departure of Bill Gates. At the present, I consider them of equivalent quality...
I'am a long, long time Windows user, and I have to say that since Win10 I have pleasantly surprised by its performance and improved user interface (there are still clunky bit, e.g when you go from the modern UI to old Windows style dialogues, such as Power Settings).

Latency on my Scarlett USB interface is also very good and stable.

I have only been tinkering with music until now. My laptop is a Sony VAIO (no longer part of the Sony line now) and is seven years old. The addition of an SSD made a HUGE difference, but I am thinking about something more powerful (basically any decent PC nowadays).

What attracts me to the Apple hardware is the things like the iMac 27" 5K display. It is so clear and vibrant, and the performance of the updated i9 processor has garnered some good reviews. I also like the design of the OS and apps.

The downsides is the huge premium for buying into the Apple ecosystem, which I could justify, but the cost of upgrading to even a modest 512GB/1TB SSD (which can only be done at the point of purchase) is exhorbitant.

I also looked at the iMini, but once you add upgrades starts to reach iMac territory, especially if you factor in buying a 4K or better display... especially as I don't make any money out of my music.

The other thing which puts me off, is the prospect of having to re-install all my music related software... not so much the DAWs, or sample libraries, but all the VST effects I have accumulated over the years.

On a different note, I had just watched the Christian Henson / Rick Beato interview on which the video you enclosed above is referenced... serendipity! :)
 

rudi

Member
And Reaper has (experimental but seemingly stable) native Linux versions available now too, which strengthens that analogy. :)

I personally won't be satisfied until I can use my kitchen appliances as some kind of unholy slave cluster.
Yes, the analogy feels very relevant. I have just dipped my toes (fingers?) into the SWS extensions to tailor Reaper to my preferences, and I am already extremely impressed with things like the Cycle and Startup Actions. More time recording, less adjusting settings :)
 

Fredeke

Active Member
I'am a long, long time Windows user, and I have to say that since Win10 I have pleasantly surprised by its performance and improved user interface (there are still clunky bit, e.g when you go from the modern UI to old Windows style dialogues, such as Power Settings).

Latency on my Scarlett USB interface is also very good and stable.

I have only been tinkering with music until now. My laptop is a Sony VAIO (no longer part of the Sony line now) and is seven years old. The addition of an SSD made a HUGE difference, but I am thinking about something more powerful (basically any decent PC nowadays).

What attracts me to the Apple hardware is the things like the iMac 27" 5K display. It is so clear and vibrant, and the performance of the updated i9 processor has garnered some good reviews. I also like the design of the OS and apps.

The downsides is the huge premium for buying into the Apple ecosystem, which I could justify, but the cost of upgrading to even a modest 512GB/1TB SSD (which can only be done at the point of purchase) is exhorbitant.

I also looked at the iMini, but once you add upgrades starts to reach iMac territory, especially if you factor in buying a 4K or better display... especially as I don't make any money out of my music.

The other thing which puts me off, is the prospect of having to re-install all my music related software... not so much the DAWs, or sample libraries, but all the VST effects I have accumulated over the years.

On a different note, I had just watched the Christian Henson / Rick Beato interview on which the video you enclosed above is referenced... serendipity! :)
The problem with "buying into" the Apple ecosystem (I love that phrase btw) is that not only do you pay 2x to 3x worth of what you get, but you can hardly update your hardware afterwards. Apple is making increasing efforts to prevent you from opening the case and tinkering inside. And their own tech support doesn't always do a great job either (when they don't flat out reply 'impossible' to a very simple and reasonable request)

As for displays, all workstations' displays are great now. I have a Lenovo Thinkpad P70 laptop with a 17'' IPS screen, on which I can tell the difference between a 4Gb and a 8Gb x264 feature-length video ! (Plus, it's anti-glare - something Apple has abandonned, along with other conveniences)

Yes, according to some, hackintosh is the way to go if you want to run OSX without paying Apple's price for the hardware. But I have no first (or even second) hand experience in the matter.

Now, when I went from Mac to Win10, the migration wasn't too painful. Activation processes are the worst (I try to use as little online-activating software as I can, because it feels like paying for the right to be bothered), but after that, export/import your Reaper config, and most plugins will be recognized and found by Reaper on the new machine. For the plugins that aren't, this is what I did: open my projects one by one on the new computer, and whenever a plugin was "missing" (of which you'll be clearly warned), I would open the project on the old computer, save the plugin's preset, and transfer it to the unrecognized instance of the same plugin on the new computer. For about 60 projects, this took me less than half a day.

I suppose your experience the other way around would be the same as mine.
 
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