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Wet libraries

dzilizzi

I know nothing
There's a lot of custom stuff used in his demos. The old 'bespoke' libs, etc.
And after a while you notice that some of the quicker and nimble ornamentations he uses (which would normally be near impossible to pull off with 'wet libraries') are actually recorded phrases/ornaments, not the traditional note-by-note playable instruments. You can hear, for example, the "ET strings trill" used in multiple AB demos. He knows that by injecting a few recorded ornaments the perceived realism skyrockets. Unfortunately, most of his little sample gems are not available to the public.
So I don't think it's completely fair to use Andy's demos as an example of what everyone should be able to achieve.
And maybe that's where Sonokinetic comes in. Add a few of their phrases here and there and maybe you will come close?
 

GtrString

Active Member
I put reverb on wet libraries too. On dry libraries, I put a room/hall on first, and then another reverb.
I also like pools..
 

rottoy

Plebeian
When it comes to wet libraries, personally I feel only Cinesamples and Alex Wallbank's efforts has nailed the perfect balance between dry and wet signals. Dry enough to be able to coax nimble passages out of it yet still wet enough to retain a nice image of the space it was recorded in.
 

miket

Senior Member
The Spitfire studio stuff is nicely balanced in that way as well. Unfortunately, I don't love the sound of Air 1 or Trackdown all that much.
 

robgb

I was young once
The Spitfire studio stuff is nicely balanced in that way as well. Unfortunately, I don't love the sound of Air 1 or Trackdown all that much.
I agree that it has a nice balance. I don't have to add any room sound, which is nice. If I'm going to go with wet, this small room wetness is much preferred. I think Spitfire did a superb job with Studio Strings Core.
 
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Jdiggity1

Stroking The Frog
Moderator
And maybe that's where Sonokinetic comes in. Add a few of their phrases here and there and maybe you will come close?
Sure! Sonokinetic phrases, Spitfire Evos, CineSamples' Hollywoodwinds, Horn/Woodwind rips, recorded triple-tongues, disco falls, pre-recorded woodwind/string runs, EastWest's RA Phrases.... all of these examples are recordings of a performance. And the more recorded performances you can use instead of faking them with static samples, the better. (provided they work in context of your piece)
 

Mike Fox

Senior Member
What drives me nuts about wet libraries is a lot of my favorite scores were recorded in studios, not concert halls. Naturally, I try to emulate that studio sound more than anything, and wet libraries seem to inhibit that.

Sorry, this thread was supposed to be about praising wet libs. I'll just shut up now. :speechless:
 

halfwalk

Member
so maybe you should stop? It's not adding anything useful to the conversation
On the contrary, I think it brings up an interesting point. While maybe not 100% relevant to the topic (which is, what? yet another "what's your favorite X" thread? no offense to OP) it's an interesting point.

Let's say you check out a demo for, say, Spitfire strings. In the demo, you hear woodwinds and brass. Since it's on the Spitfire site, and the point of the demo is to show off a Spitfire product, it's not entirely unreasonable to assume that the woodwinds and brass in the demo are also Spitfire products.

But my point is, that's just an assumption we might make. It's not that the marketing is misleading or anything like that. But it's, 99% of the time, not explicitly stated what the other libraries used are. So we are left with guesses, assumptions, and questions. In other words, we might be misleading ourselves about the products we want to buy.

I'm not saying the lack of transparency is necessarily deliberate on the part of either the dev or the demo composer, but it's something worth considering when we evaluate demos. We can't just assume that, say, a Spitfire demo contains only Spitfire products, because nobody has told us that in the first place.
 
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OP
Syneast

Syneast

Active Member
I'd like to point out that people shouldn't confuse "wet" with "long tail".
...
The room of say, CSB or any Cinesamples stuff (Sony Scoring Stage) is way different than in the Air studio, but technically speaking it's all wet as long as you use the room mics.
Exactly. Small rooms and sound stages could also be considered wet, but that's not the sound this thread is about.

I know all about how you put convolution ER and tail reverb on stuff recorded in smaller spaces to simulate a big space, but the character of the original sound still shines through, since some accentuated frequencies make it obvious that it was recorded in a smaller space. For instance, EW Hollywood Orchestra could be considered wet since it's got a lot of ER baked in, but the smaller space still gives it a harsh quality that a larger space wouldn't.

I tried to clearify in my original post that I want to hear about everyone's favorite libraries with long tails baked in, because if the tail is long that usually means the library was recorded in a large space. I guess there aren't that many of those libraries!
 
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