Wasting money

Ivan M.

Member
Hey fellow composers,

What I notice is people talking endlessly about new libraries and throwing endless amounts of money at them. Why do you do that? Do you really need 5 strings libs, 5 brass, 5 woods, 55 percussion, 999 sound design? Especially if you are going to record live orchestra later it just defeats the purpose. Or if you keep it all in the box, no current lib will sound good enough. Or if hyper-realism is not an imperative, then all of the current libs get the job done. So does it really matter to have so many of them?

What I want to suggest is: save money! Don't be like kids in a toy store, unable to control your impulses. Pay off your debts as soon as possible, save up for an emergency fund, and invest.
 

Zedcars

Klaatu barada nikto
GAS is real.

But then there is also the reality that as the march of technological advancements continue, so does the depth, usability, playability, versatility, and realism of sample libraries. You could have said this in the Gigasampler years, or the Proteus 2 years, or the Fairlight years, or the Mellotron years and you’d never have progressed. We are getting close to the ‘one-sample-library-to-rule-them-all’ scenario but we are not there yet.

People buy the latest and greatest in order to achieve a better sound, have greater options, and be able to compose quicker and easier because there is less struggling to make a poorly recorded/edited French Horn sound great.

Also I think our natural hoarding instincts originating from our hunter gatherer ancestors come into play here. It’s almost as if we are programmed to take as much as we can in case there is some terrible sample drought approaching.

However, it’s also just very difficult to truly evaluate a library solely from demos and walkthroughs. I think if there was a way to fully trial these libraries before purchase it would enable us to make wiser decisions. But you might well find there would be less sales as a consequence. Perhaps this is the main reason why hardly any company offers a free trial, besides the practicality of doing so.
 

kociol21

New Member
GAS is real.

But then there is also the reality that as the march of technological advancements continue, so does the depth, usability, playability, versatility, and realism of sample libraries. You could have said this in the Gigasampler years, or the Proteus 2 years, or the Fairlight years, or the Mellotron years and you’d never have progressed. We are getting close to the ‘one-sample-library-to-rule-them-all’ scenario but we are not there yet.
Off topic but I think we are very close to the border of sample libraries capabilities. If you look at different comparisons, there is often the notion that for example EWQL or VSL samples from a decade ago are mostly as good as big libraries from 2019. Main change that happened in last decade was switching to wet recordings. The rest is just "more", so more mics to choose, much better legato becasue deeper sampling etc. it all comes from a fact that disk space and RAM are now much cheaper and more accessible than 10-15 years ago and we have SSDs now. So it doesn't matter THAT much more if library takes 150GB and eats 60GB of RAM from the start. On the other hand, how bigger you can go? 20 round robins for every note? 50 legato transitions per note? 20 mics? Not much more to squeeze from this technology and CPU power rises quicker now than out memory and storage capacity. So I think next decade will be the end stage of big libraries and rise of modeling. We already have Pianoteq, Modo Bass/Drums, SWAM engine etc. this get better and better and are more capable every iteration.
 

Beluga

Arctic and sub-Arctic cetacean
Composers are passionate people and love a new toy. But I do agree with you and went out of the race way back. I still keep my eyes and ears open for anything truly new but I rarely find it. When I find it it’s often non-mainstream. I used EW brass for over a decade and it stood up against any new lib. For practical reasons I changed recently. I had reprogrammed all my libs to my needs.

I say to get more out of your libs learn how to write better music. It’s more work but buying newer libs will only get you so far.

\unpopular opinion of course:)
 

Living Fossil

Senior Member
What I want to suggest is: save money! Don't be like kids in a toy store, unable to control your impulses. Pay off your debts as soon as possible, save up for an emergency fund, and invest.
If this is a good way for you, just do it.
For me, the only relevant aspect is called RoI.
Which means Return of Investment.
If a library helps me a project get done, i will buy it.
It's as simple as that.
And btw., composing & producing music for a living is quite a tough job, i absolutely enjoy these little joys that buying libraries give me. Makes me feel like a kid in a toy store. Great feeling.
 

Arbee

Senior Member
Unfortunately many of us can fall victim to compulsive consumer behaviour. Savvy library developers have learnt the lessons of wine clubs, gambling sites, charities etc. That is, once you buy once, you keep getting pummelled to encourage you to establish a buying "habit". They know once you really take a breath and think about what you're doing, you're likely to close your wallet.
 

John Longley

Surly and Charitable
Talking about gear instead of music creates entire industries. I think we're much less afraid to discuss tools than we are music and because we're social we subconsciously keep spending go have something to talk about. It would be cool if discussing the music became priority, but it won't as it's so personal and new toys are too powerful.

I do think people might be getting slowly tired of accelerating product release schedules and something may give. The noise is endless.
 

KallumS

Senior Member
At the end of the day this website is called VI Control, and is a site generally dedicated to talking about products, sales, reviews and of course composing. To expect the forum to stop discussing purchasing libraries is like expecting a football forum to stop talking about football.
 

Arbee

Senior Member
Talking about gear instead of music creates entire industries. I think we're much less afraid to discuss tools than we are music and because we're social we subconsciously keep spending go have something to talk about. It would be cool if discussing the music became priority, but it won't as it's so personal and new toys are too powerful.

I do think people might be getting slowly tired of accelerating product release schedules and something may give. The noise is endless.
And many, teachers, developers, coaches, mentors, PR companies etc etc have realised that selling dreams is a lot more lucrative than living them.
 

AndyP

Senior Member
What I want to suggest is: save money! Don't be like kids in a toy store, unable to control your impulses. Pay off your debts as soon as possible, save up for an emergency fund, and invest.
What's wrong with being a kid in a toy store? It fires the imagination and creativity. It keeps me young and keeps me curious.

I love to have a choice of sounds and be inspired.
Not everybody does exclusively classical compositions where the result does not necessarily depend on the library you have used.

As long as it's affordable, someone can afford it without starving the family or themselves, why not?

There are also enough musicians who would like to do it, but can't afford the money for it. Who knows what we miss out on great works for this reason?

I'd rather spend money on my studio than spend it in a pub every weekend.

Don't grieve, Admiral. It's logical.
 

AndyP

Senior Member
Since all sports events take place without spectators from now on, a lot of cash remains in my pocket.
Drinking alone at home is no fun either, so I go to my trusted website and order one or two string libraries. Well invested money, but unfortunately it doesn't make me drunk at all.
If anyone can survive the virus panic, it's computer nerds and lonely composers.