Waiting for Spitfire Audio subscription service

Are you waiting for Spitfire Audio subscription service?

  • More than anything

    Votes: 14 7.4%
  • Yes I am

    Votes: 20 10.5%
  • No, I'll pass

    Votes: 142 74.7%
  • What's the hype anyway?

    Votes: 14 7.4%

  • Total voters
    190

stfciu

Active Member
I think most of you will agree Spitfire Audio has become a major player in the virtual instruments market. They have achieved a well respected position and we can also observe a significant acceleration in development both in terms of quality and number of realeses in recent years.

Considering the fact that some of fellow members already mentioned that directly or in between lines in few threads I would like to ask you if you find Spitifire Audio is ready and should already consider a subscription service.

As a side plot I am wondering as well if it is technically possible anyway considering most of their libraries are based on kontakt.

Hoping on an input on this.

Best Regards,
Sebastian
 

Mike Fox

Senior Member
I definitely think the demand is there! Before buying all the SF libraries I now own, I would love to have signed on for a subscription service just to see if library A or library B is worth buying.
 

markleake

Recovering sale addict
I thought Spitfire had already indicated this wasn't a possibility. The contracts and other arrangements they make with the players they record for their libraries don't allow for it. It's the same reason they don't offer re-sales of their libraries. Legally it is too complicated and/or just not possible.
 

Wunderhorn

Active Member
Sorry to be straight forward here, but in my opinion subscriptions for anything software is the most idiotic thing - users who entertain this notion are about to shoot themselves in the leg in the worst possible way. Look at what happened over at Adobe: customers became puppets for beta software testing as there is no incentive anymore to keep the quality of their product up because the money is flowing anyway and they are being milked for their personal data as their software kraken connects to Adobe servers every few minutes around the clock to send god knows what there (And upon asking for information about that Adobe will deny your inquiry). This is just one example and I haven't mention any $ calculations yet. Compared over the years the subscription proved to be certainly more expensive.
I'd like to be in charge of my own updates, when and how often I feel is right for my workflow.
Also, in regards to sample libraries - once you cancel a subscription, what about all your hard work and compositions as instruments won't be loading anymore? All you can have then is audio stems? And only if you were smart enough to save it this way...?
A try-before-you-buy solution could be interesting, but only for that purpose.
So no, I will only want to buy my sample libraries as a perpetual license as it works right now. Ever.
 
OP
stfciu

stfciu

Active Member
Sorry to be straight forward here, but in my opinion subscriptions for anything software is the most idiotic thing - users who entertain this notion are about to shoot themselves in the leg in the worst possible way. Look at what happened over at Adobe: customers became puppets for beta software testing as there is no incentive anymore to keep the quality of their product up because the money is flowing anyway and they are being milked for their personal data as their software kraken connects to Adobe servers every few minutes around the clock to send god knows what there (And upon asking for information about that Adobe will deny your inquiry). This is just one example and I haven't mention any $ calculations yet. Compared over the years the subscription proved to be certainly more expensive.
I'd like to be in charge of my own updates, when and how often I feel is right for my workflow.
Also, in regards to sample libraries - once you cancel a subscription, what about all your hard work and compositions as instruments won't be loading anymore? All you can have then is audio stems? And only if you were smart enough to save it this way...?
A try-before-you-buy solution could be interesting, but only for that purpose.
So no, I will only want to buy my sample libraries as a perpetual license as it works right now. Ever.
Straightforward is what the thread was aimed for. Many thanks for your input.
I mostly do agree with the argumentation.
 
OP
stfciu

stfciu

Active Member
I definitely think the demand is there! Before buying all the SF libraries I now own, I would love to have signed on for a subscription service just to see if library A or library B is worth buying.
It does confirm what also @Wunderhorn said. It might be the demand is actually a little bit alternate.
Thanks for feedback.
 

JamieLang

Active Member
Well, I will explain the situation where it's not. You're likely thinking about it as someone who uses string samples every time you open your DAW. I just did my whole latest EP's string arranging with a 30day demo of Cubase 9.5....as example. I won't likely do any more strings for a year. Maybe two. Hell--prior to this, I'd bet it was 6 years ago I did string arranging.

I likely have $3k in string samples and Cubase licenses that are needed by me once in blue moon when I want to arrange strings for one of my ditties. And, to circle back, I'd love to do the next one with Spitfire's Studio Strings...if I can give them $20 and do that? If even further I decide I want the Chambers instead and download those...maybe add a solo cello from the solo strings...all for the $20?

I'm on board. To pay $1500 for those libraries? Nope. Not likely going to happen again in my life. Been there. Done that.
 

Mike Fox

Senior Member
It does confirm what also @Wunderhorn said. It might be the demand is actually a little bit alternate.
Thanks for feedback.
For sure!

I just look at EW and see how successful their subscription service has been. People absolutely love it, and it gives consumers the oppertunity to try before they buy. This really comes in handy when you're on the fence about buying an expensive library.
Unfortunately, I don't think a subscription service is a "one size fits all" business model.
 

Mike Fox

Senior Member
Sorry to be straight forward here, but in my opinion subscriptions for anything software is the most idiotic thing - users who entertain this notion are about to shoot themselves in the leg in the worst possible way. Look at what happened over at Adobe: customers became puppets for beta software testing as there is no incentive anymore to keep the quality of their product up because the money is flowing anyway and they are being milked for their personal data as their software kraken connects to Adobe servers every few minutes around the clock to send god knows what there (And upon asking for information about that Adobe will deny your inquiry). This is just one example and I haven't mention any $ calculations yet. Compared over the years the subscription proved to be certainly more expensive.
I'd like to be in charge of my own updates, when and how often I feel is right for my workflow.
Also, in regards to sample libraries - once you cancel a subscription, what about all your hard work and compositions as instruments won't be loading anymore? All you can have then is audio stems? And only if you were smart enough to save it this way...?
A try-before-you-buy solution could be interesting, but only for that purpose.
So no, I will only want to buy my sample libraries as a perpetual license as it works right now. Ever.
That's a scary thought. Developers taking advantage of customers, turning them into beta testers, abusing personal info, etc.? That really would be horrible! However, I think if a developer ever did repeatedly do that, their reputation would go right down the toilet, and wouldn't last in this industry. I don't think any sample library developers will ever get as big as Adobe, so I don't think they would be able to afford a risky move like that. Then again, stranger things have happened!

As far as accessing your tracks, I believe EW recommends bouncing your files before cancelling your subscription.
 

d.healey

Music Monkey
There are two types of subscription service.
One is a support and updates service where the user makes an account on the developer's website and they get products, updates, and some kind of tech support package. This subscription service is a pretty good deal for both developer and user.
The second type requires the user to install the developer's proprietary (closed source) app on their computer and give the developer permission to add and remove software from the user's computer. Usually the user is also required to have an internet connection in order to use the software and this of course means that every time the user runs the software they inform the developer. This is a pretty good deal for the developer and a terrible deal for the user.
 
OP
stfciu

stfciu

Active Member
For sure!

I just look at EW and see how successful their subscription service has been. People absolutely love it, and it gives consumers the oppertunity to try before they buy. This really comes in handy when you're on the fence about buying an expensive library.
Unfortunately, I don't think a subscription service is a "one size fits all" business model.
Agree. One of the reasons to start the discussion was my interest in EW composer cloud which I also find very interesting. When I matched it with my beloved SA libraries I already own I thought initially that might be the perfect match for the future. I even thought the origin of having their own engine is to have full control of it for those purposes.

After some thinking and seeing the comments I am not that sure.

P.S. Recently, among my general professional duties, I had training about servitization of products as a state of the art way of making business in present times. I was a little bit overwhelmed seeing how many areas are being brought into this structure of "using". While I am not that optimistic about it, it is not debatable that many parts of our life are going in this direction.
 

puremusic

Active Member
Honestly, you don't need subscriptions to try before you buy. There's demo software, stuff like Try-Sound, reviews, walkthroughs.. There are alternatives that cover all the bases without requiring you to pay monthly for the rest of your life.
 

Bill the Lesser

Active Member
Do subscription models demotivate product quality and innovation? I'm sensing that with Adobe's subscription Photoshop that has been getting buggier with every "new" version. I just lost several 43.5 x 94 inch prints because of ridiculous bugs that weren't there before.

Are they unmotivated? Are they ignoring their old core products? I dunno, but it worries me. It is thought that while the total number of subscriptions in the field are large at any one time, the average subscriber is on board for a fairly short stay which tends to minimize squeaky cogs.

I'm very pleased with my Spitfire libs. I want it to stay that way. Between information on the 'net and this forum I have never been unpleasantly surprised by a box labelled Spitfire.
 

Harzmusic

Active Member
To be honest, in a diverse market like this, I really don't like the implications of high quality, low price subscription services like this.
It might be nice for customers at first, but I fear that it would solidify the market and make it close to impossible for new and smaller devs to bring innovation to the field.
If subscriptions becomes the prevalent model, the singular product can be devalued. If I can get all products from developer X for 15€/month, why would I buy new and innovative product from developer Y for 399€? Sure, some will still buy the new thing, but wouldn't many wait, until Spitfire does something similar?

But I fear that a subscription model is only feasible if you already have a solid customer base, a catalogue of existing products and have a lot of solid capital behind your company. This could shut out smaller devs in favour of the big players only.

Might not come that way, and I might be wrong, but I do not really like the idea.
 

fretti

Senior Member
Imo switching to a subscription model would stand in the way of them growing at the pace they did over the past 2 years...
Even if legally possible I don‘t think they can pay their bills with a model of 20€/month and keep hiring new people and putting out new products at such a fast rate (+ moving to their new head quarters). They probably would have to charge much more, so that the possible number of users most likely shrinks drastically as they can‘t compete with the price of composer cloud + most professionals on this forum would still rather buy new products now then just rent them.
(My two Cents)
 

Pixelpoet1985

Active Member
I'm not a fan of subscription services, you pay way too much for the stuff. In the end, it all depends on which products you actually use of the available products.

An example: I have Composer Cloud for two years now.
ca. €30 € per month x 24 => ca. €720.

I'm using only the orchestral stuff, and have to stick with the Gold version via the cloud. With the recent sale, I could have bought the Diamond version for half of this price!

On the other hand, I'm a media designer and also have the Adobe Cloud. It's even more expensive, but there isn't really an alternative. The good thing is that the products are updated regularly. I think this is very important for any subscription service. I'm not happy with Composer Cloud, because the orchestral stuff doesn't get updated. It has potential, but needs some re-scripting, in my opinion, and I don't like the Play engine.

For me, more important is to have the ability to test a library. Best Service is the only provider which offers this service, I think, but only for the majority of their own products or VSL starter editions. If I remember correctly there once was Symphobia available.
 

pinki

Active Member
Well, I will explain the situation where it's not. You're likely thinking about it as someone who uses string samples every time you open your DAW. I just did my whole latest EP's string arranging with a 30day demo of Cubase 9.5....as example. I won't likely do any more strings for a year. Maybe two. Hell--prior to this, I'd bet it was 6 years ago I did string arranging.

I likely have $3k in string samples and Cubase licenses that are needed by me once in blue moon when I want to arrange strings for one of my ditties. And, to circle back, I'd love to do the next one with Spitfire's Studio Strings...if I can give them $20 and do that? If even further I decide I want the Chambers instead and download those...maybe add a solo cello from the solo strings...all for the $20?
I'm on board. To pay $1500 for those libraries? Nope. Not likely going to happen again in my life. Been there. Done that.
I think your scenario is really important and I’m somwhat in a similar situation.

Im just never ever going to have the money to purchase in the way some can who have income from other jobs.. A recent survey by BASCA found the average yearly income of a composer in the UK was around £11,000. .....11k!, That’s not really enough to survive. So the thought of spending large amounts of money on purchasing string libraries is not an option.

Spending $25 on Composer Cloud definitely is an option ....as I’m about to do this month as I have two commissions in in January. But at the moment I have nothing in February or March. In the meantime I scrabble around picking up libraries second hand. (NI SSSE for £90...yes!). The fact that Spitfire don’t allow resale makes their libraies off limit for me. If there was a subscription service it would be amazing for professional composers in my opinion.

The reality of the pro composer’s existence is bleak! 95% barely make a living. HZ is a very rare example! So subscription services are very welcome. Besides it’s not an either or situation.
 

Floris

New Member
I'm not a fan of subscription services, you pay way too much for the stuff. In the end, it all depends on which products you actually use of the available products.

An example: I have Composer Cloud for two years now.
ca. €30 € per month x 24 => ca. €720.

I'm using only the orchestral stuff, and have to stick with the Gold version via the cloud. With the recent sale, I could have bought the Diamond version for half of this price!
...
This is also my main problem with subscriptions like this. You almost never use a library for a month only, so while €30 might not seem like a whole lot - it does ramp up to cost what you're paying for libraries now even though you don't technically 'own' the libraries.

It sometimes feels more like sugar-coating a price to make it seem more affordable and accessible while you're in reality better off picking a library up on a decent sale and using it for the rest of your life.
 

pinki

Active Member
This is also my main problem with subscriptions like this. You almost never use a library for a month only, so while €30 might not seem like a whole lot - it does ramp up to cost what you're paying for libraries now even though you don't technically 'own' the libraries.

It sometimes feels more like sugar-coating a price to make it seem more affordable and accessible while you're in reality better off picking a library up on a decent sale and using it for the rest of your life.

But not if you dip in and out and use a library when you need it?