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Update: My New Ryzen build .... so far

pderbidge

Senior Member
I'll try and document my build in this new thread as it progresses for anyone else interested in my experience with this new processor. For this first post I'll try and cut to the chase and answer questions I've seen many have regarding the new Ryzen's vs Intel's 9900k. Although I don't own the 9900k I think given the reviews, benchmarks and my own personal experience so far with the 3700x I think I can still give a fair analysis of where the 9900k falls in comparison to the Ryzen offerings. In succeeding posts I'll outline my build process and discuss my observations but in this post I'm just going to give my take on price/performance value between the new Ryzens and the flagship 9900k. Now let's get to the answer you've all been waiting for:)

Performance Wise- I would say the landscape looks like this: (with the first being the best performer)

1. Ryzen 7 3900x
2. i9 9900k (or KF variant without igp which is more comparable to Ryzen)
3. Ryzen 7 3700x (don't bother with 3800x, it's not likely to be any better than the 3700x)
4. Probably a tie between i7 8700k and Ryzen 5 3600x with 3600x pulling ahead in multi threading efficiency but less overclocking headroom than i7 8700k

I think the above was fairly obvious from the Dawbench results that have already been published.

Now to the good and bad.

The Bad: Buying a Ryzen is a bit like buying a lottery ticket. some people get silicon that performs at all core speeds up to 4.4GHZ and then there's me where my max stable speeds are between 4.1 and 4.2. I know some earlier Intel architecture was like this but I think by now Intel has this silicon process down and if you buy an i9, the chances of getting an all core 5ghz clock is pretty solid.

The Good: Despite this silicon lottery, the results of my 3700x in early testing seem really solid. I can only imagine how this would perform if they could push this architecture to 5ghz. Also, there are some multi threaded tasks where even this 3700x can outperform the i9 9900k.

The Bad: There definitely seems to be a bug in the bios regarding temps. Mine seems awfully hot, however nothing else in my case seems affected by it which leads me to believe it is a bug. Keep in mind I already have high ambient temps to deal with since I have yet to install central air so during the blistering July and August I'm getting room temps between 25c and 26c. With that being the case I'm experiencing Idle Temps between 37c and 51c and under Aida64 stress temps it gets up to 93c at times with a Noctua NH-u14s and a single fan. The case itself has 5 120mm fans. There is a thermal limit of 95c and as long as the precision boost is doing it's job it will never end up going over that. Aida64 is currently at 3 hours right now and nothing has gone beyond 93c and mostly hovers around 83c. Even at these supposed temps I'm getting all core boosts of between 4Ghz and 4.2Ghz. I'll say it again though, I don't think these temps are accurate. when I touch the VRM's on the motherboard they are barely warm and the case isn't even putting out that much heat when I put my hand in front of the exhaust or inside the case. I wish I had proper tools to measure this definitively but unfortunately I do not. I'll keep my eyes on this to make sure I didn't get a dud in the TDP department.

OK, just to elaborate on temps- the other reason I don't think those temps are accurate or at least comparable to the way we're used to reading temps is because the way AMD reports to the bios. It is very active. It has to do this because of it's precision boost (not precision boost overdrive which is something else but kinda similar) technology. Because it's so actively checking stats with the sensors in order to do it's thing, the bios is getting almost real-time data that fluctuates quite a bit rather than us seeing averages as we would with other CPU architectures.

The Good: There's almost no overclocking room in these chips. Wait, what? that's a good thing? Actually, yes. What AMD has done is try to give the average consumer a chip with a built in technology that pushes max performance out of it's processor and leaves almost nothing else on the table. This means that non-overclockers can be assured they'll get the best possible performance out of their purchase by just plugging it in. You can't complain too much about that can you? Of course, I'd still like to have seen the ability to push it further, and I tried (corrupting my OS in the process and having to reinstall but the performance benefit with the added heat was not enough to justify a small overclock of 4.2GHZ on my chip.

The Bad (and good): If you don't need the features of the x570 platform then you can save a good deal of money on a Ryzen build, however if you need the features of the x570 chipset then I think the 3700x is less enticing than Intel's Z390 chipset. The prices will be similar, especially with an i9 9900kf. With the i9 you get a tried and tested architecture and no early bios growing pains to deal with. I knew this would likely be the case and I went for the 3700x anyways because I just wanted to support AMD's new achievement and it was still going to perform pretty close to the 9900k. Besides, the CPU was never my bottleneck to begin with but rather lack of more memory and SSD's which I can happily say is no longer the case.

So to sum up the price to performance ratio I'd dare say that if you're going to invest in Ryzen then a 3600x or a 3900x are the better choices. One being a more budget friendly option and the other being more of a performance driven purchase. The difference in motherboard prices between x570(expensive) and z390(affordable) makes a 3700x vs 9900k purchase too narrow to justify the 3700x if you're looking for the better DAW performer. If you already own a B450 board or an X470 board or want to purchase one of those because you don't need what X570 or Z390 offer then a 3700x starts to make sense.

Well, that's it for now. I haven't even begun to transfer all my samples and VST's to the new PC yet so I can't offer much more than what I've stated here for now.
 
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First many thanks for your feedback Derbidge, it is very full of usefull informations :2thumbs:

For more deep answers :
Concerning your temps problem, it is possible it comes from a bug. Every new architecture has a lot of bios update, and i saw that AMD was pretty reactive to make them. Actually there are one each week. Try to make every bios update and check the AMD website to see if there is some bugs report.
You can also verify yours temps with a freeware like hardware monitor.

Another thing to ckeck is you thermal paste, the best one is thermal grizzly krionaut, you can gain some °C with this one. (the noctua is good too)

You will able to obtain 60 - 68 °C on charge with an ambient room temp of 25 - 26°c.

Overclocking :
It's just a point of view. Somebody else would prefer a chip that he can overclock to gain a boost without spending more money (except on electricity bill ;), but i agree with you. I don't care of overclocking, i think that for the gain of power we get it's vain! Your processor's getting too hot, and it uses a lot more energy. All the system going to warm up, and it can shutdown if it isn't stable. I let this to specialists. I don't care about that. So i'm like you , i prefer a processor who can give me the full of his power without overclocking it. And it's what you get with AMD.
But again it's a matter of taste.

Concerning the features:

For a newcommer and others DAW users, we can consider that they comes from an Intel architecture for the most of them. So considering a B450 or X470 is not very good in my opinion. If they want to purchase a Ryzen 3000 serie, they must buy a X570 even if they don't want the features. Why because B450 and X470 are compatible with Ryzen 3000, but when you purchase it they will not be updated with the last bios update... And for that you must have an older ryzen processor to do it. Ok if you ask to AMD they can send you a kit for this update but what a waste of time! And Ryzen 3000 were made to work with the last platform X570. Futhermore if you build a new PC it's better to go with the lastest hardware in order to push the lifetime at the limit. That's why i consider that X570 is a must have with a new architecture based on Ryzen 3000.

If you have an older Ryzen, then ok you can go with a Ryzen 3000 it's just an BIOS update and keep your actual motherboard.

In this end:

Your conclusion restart my reflexion of going into Ryzen! In the first hand, i want to reward AMD for all these good things, and to benefit from a new 2019 architecture, but with your feedback i wonder now if the 3700X is the right choice. I'm not very interresting with the pci express 4 feature. Because the SSD Pci E4 are too far expensive for now, and it's going really hot. In the other hand graphic cards PCi E 4 are not there for the moment except RX 5700 and 5700 XT (but i do not gaming with my computer so nevermind).
So reconsidering an i9 9900k for best DAW performance has restart! But i'm still tempting by a 3700X!

Last thing : Have you any noise issue with the motherboard fan? It was one of your fear.
And again many thanks for your valuable feedback :2thumbs:
 
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dasbin

New Member
From what I can tell the Z390 and X570 prices are basically equivalent. There are inexpensive-ish X570 boards (like the Gigabyte Aorus Elite) that have the same feature-set as Z390 boards around the same price, and the higher end boards (Aorus Master, etc) also have equivalent Z390 boards at the same price with similar features.

The same-named models are slightly more expensive for the X570 variants, but those variants have beefier VRM's than their same-named Z390 boards... so you kind of have to compare a Z390 vs. one-level-down X570. That is, compare VRM's to find an equivilant motherboard across the two lines, don't just assume the same-named model is the comparable model.

It's strange to me that all the manufacturers decided to bump up their VRM lineup across the board on X570 so much, when an overlocked 9900k actually needs way more power than any of the Zen 2 chips.

My shopping around, at least here in Canada, puts the price of a 9900K system with an equivilant motherboard much more expensive than a 3700X system, and just barely under the price of a 3900x system.

AMD recently came out with new chipset drivers which address high idle temps / voltages when used in conjunction with a Windows 10 update. And it sounds like new BIOS revisions are on the way to address other things.

The one remaining disappointment for many is that boost clocks are not reaching advertised speeds in any case where it actually matters. For some it is as much as 400-500Mhz under. (Though for most it is more like 50-100Mhz under).
 
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pderbidge

pderbidge

Senior Member
You can also verify yours temps with a freeware like hardware monitor.
I've checked temps with Hardware Monitor, Hardware info, Ryzen Master and Asrock's A-Tune Utility and of course, the Bios. They are all pretty much the same. I assume they are are getting their info directly from the bios.

Another thing to ckeck is you thermal paste, the best one is thermal grizzly krionaut, you can gain some °C with this one. (the noctua is good too)
I have only used the thermal paste that came with the Noctua, which all reviewers have said is very good paste. I have applied it twice to verify that I somehow didn't get it right the first time. No change in temps. Do you have a new Ryzen? Maybe you can verify better temps. If for some reason my chip is not working to spec then I'll need to exchange it.

i prefer a processor who can give me the full of his power without overclocking it
The interesting thing about overclocking the 3rd gen Ryzens is that reviewers have unanimously been pointing out that there seems to be very little gained in trying to overclock this CPU. This is mostly due to way that AMD has implemented Precision Boost. There is more testing and analysis about this here.

Why because B450 and X470 are compatible with Ryzen 3000, but when you purchase it they will not be updated with the last bios update... And for that you must have an older ryzen processor to do it. Ok if you ask to AMD they can send you a kit for this update but what a waste of time
This is an important point to note for newcomers, however I can still see this as a value prop for the more adventurous and you could build a very good system by going this route so I don't agree that it is a waste of time for everyone. It's just going to be an individual preference.

So reconsidering an i9 9900k for best DAW performance has restart! But i'm still tempting by a 3700X!
It's a tough choice because there are upgrade paths with choosing an X570 platform. You could easily upgrade the CPU in the future and get better than 9900k performance. Many would argue, rightfully, that there is no such thing as future proof anymore since new platforms and architecture tend to end up being cheaper than upgrading older components so by the time you might want to upgrade your CPU there might be more cost advantages to just get a whole new system. This is why I think the 9900k is still possibly a better choice. The price difference between going 3700x and 9900k just isn't that much when you compare the sum of the parts.

Have you any noise issue with the motherboard fan? It was one of your fear.
Yes it was one of my biggest fears and now is actually my least. I'm more concerned with temps right now as I don't want to get stuck with a possible lemon so I'm going to discuss with the retailer to see what my options are. It would be nice if someone had a used sample for me to test against my own to ensure I'm not dealing with a poor piece of Silicon. I will repeat however, that nothing other than the monitoring indicates a heat issue. I've dealt with older AMD CPU's that got extremely hot and remember that just by putting my hand in front of the exhaust or in the case you could feel the heat. That is not happening here. The only rotten thing is that the readings from the monitoring system probably throttles my performance a bit which is why I'm seeing 4.1ghz all cores on stress load vs perhaps a 4.4ghz. But yeah, as you can tell, the small fan isn't even a concern anymore. There is no mechanical whine and it's inaudible against the case fans.
 
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pderbidge

pderbidge

Senior Member
From what I can tell the Z390 and X570 prices are basically equivalent. There are inexpensive-ish X570 boards (like the Gigabyte Aorus Elite) that have the same feature-set as Z390 boards around the same price, and the higher end boards (Aorus Master, etc) also have equivalent Z390 boards at the same price with similar features.
Sort of true. The issue is if you want Thunderbolt support and better VRM's you only have Asrock to choose from on X570 which will lead most people to the Taichi mobo and above. With Z390, you are not limited to one brand for this feature and therefore have access to better sales when they happen. If the Gigabyte Aorus Elite supported Thunderbolt then that would have been the best $200 X570 board to choose. As it stands now, there are good sales on z390 boards around $200+ but for X570 to get equivalent you have to jump up to $300+ - That right there makes price gap of about $120 for the 9900kf even smaller since you have to buy a more costly motherboard for Ryzen. And the fact that DAWBENCH still shows the i9 pulling ahead of the 3700x it becomes a hard sell to pay the same for less performance.
 
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pderbidge

pderbidge

Senior Member
My shopping around, at least here in Canada, puts the price of a 9900K system with an equivilant motherboard much more expensive than a 3700X system, and just barely under the price of a 3900x system.
This is a good point. I am talking prices in the US, which is not indicative of anywhere else.
 
I've checked temps with Hardware Monitor, Hardware info, Ryzen Master and Asrock's A-Tune Utility and of course, the Bios. They are all pretty much the same. I assume they are are getting their info directly from the bios.


I have only used the thermal paste that came with the Noctua, which all reviewers have said is very good paste. I have applied it twice to verify that I somehow didn't get it right the first time. No change in temps. Do you have a new Ryzen? Maybe you can verify better temps. If for some reason my chip is not working to spec then I'll need to exchange it.
Unfortunatly i have not a Ryzen for the moment, so i can't tell you about the Temps, but i read a lot of reviews and yours temps aren't normal. But there is a "sort of bug". I found this on reddit in order to help you. It's a long thread but you could find a soltution to your problem :

Hope this will help you :2thumbs:

The interesting thing about overclocking the 3rd gen Ryzens is that reviewers have unanimously been pointing out that there seems to be very little gained in trying to overclock this CPU. This is mostly due to way that AMD has implemented Precision Boost. There is more testing and analysis about this here.
Thanks i'll check that.

It's a tough choice because there are upgrade paths with choosing an X570 platform. You could easily upgrade the CPU in the future and get better than 9900k performance. Many would argue, rightfully, that there is no such thing as future proof anymore since new platforms and architecture tend to end up being cheaper than upgrading older components so by the time you might want to upgrade your CPU there might be more cost advantages to just get a whole new system. This is why I think the 9900k is still possibly a better choice. The price difference between going 3700x and 9900k just isn't that much when you compare the sum of the parts.
Yes it's true, for somebody it will be more future proof, or budget proof to chose a Ryzen because you can just update the processor, but i agree with you that there is a little difference between the cost platform of Ryzen and 9900k to take advantage to one or the other.
But if you don't need a graphic card, the advantage goes to intel. (i9 9900k has an integrated graphic but not the ryzen). It's a tough choice anyway :sad:

Yes it was one of my biggest fears and now is actually my least. I'm more concerned with temps right now as I don't want to get stuck with a possible lemon so I'm going to discuss with the retailer to see what my options are. It would be nice if someone had a used sample for me to test against my own to ensure I'm not dealing with a poor piece of Silicon. I will repeat however, that nothing other than the monitoring indicates a heat issue. I've dealt with older AMD CPU's that got extremely hot and remember that just by putting my hand in front of the exhaust or in the case you could feel the heat. That is not happening here. The only rotten thing is that the readings from the monitoring system probably throttles my performance a bit which is why I'm seeing 4.1ghz all cores on stress load vs perhaps a 4.4ghz. But yeah, as you can tell, the small fan isn't even a concern anymore. There is no mechanical whine and it's inaudible against the case fans.
Thanks for the info that the noise generating by the motherboard fan is not a problem.

I'll check more info on your temp problem, and if i found something i will tell you. :thumbsup:
 
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pderbidge

pderbidge

Senior Member
AMD recently came out with new chipset drivers which address high idle temps / voltages when used in conjunction with a Windows 10 update. And it sounds like new BIOS revisions are on the way to address other things.
I'm keeping an eye on it but so far I'm on the latest bios so I can only assume that I might have some bad silicon. I'm going to call my retailer and see if we can work out an exchange and go from there. I've had a bit of bad luck regarding AMD's Qaulity control. The first CPU I received had bent pins so I exchanged it right away for a new one and now this new one seems to have an issue with temps.
 
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dasbin

New Member
I'm keeping an eye on it but so far I'm on the latest bios so I can only assume that I might have some bad silicon
The update for temp/voltage was for chipset drivers, not a BIOS update.

It's here: https://community.amd.com/community/gaming/blog/2019/07/26/community-update-5-let-s-talk-clocks-voltages-and-destiny-2

Note you also need to be running Windows 10 version 1903

One thing that stands out from this is that Ryzen Master was previously reporting the highest core temp sensor as the CPU temperature. After the update, now it will report an average of all the sensors which should be more accurate.
 
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pderbidge

pderbidge

Senior Member
The update for temp/voltage was for chipset drivers, not a BIOS update.

It's here: https://community.amd.com/community/gaming/blog/2019/07/26/community-update-5-let-s-talk-clocks-voltages-and-destiny-2

Note you also need to be running Windows 10 version 1903

One thing that stands out from this is that Ryzen Master was previously reporting the highest core temp sensor as the CPU temperature. After the update, now it will report an average of all the sensors which should be more accurate.
Ahh, thanks for the clarification. I did install the latest chipset driver direct from AMD's site and did the latest Windows 10 update so I'm assuming I have both. I'll have to double check. Nevertheless I'm exchanging the CPU and already have approval to do so (I'm within the 15 day time frame) so we'll see how that goes. If it's not the CPU or the bios or the chipset drivers or Windows, then the next thing to troubleshoot will be my cooler. I forgot to try the Wraith Spire cooler it came with to see if that made a difference. For now though, since I already have approval to swap out the CPU I'm just going to do that first. At least that should eliminate one of the scenarios.

Thanks to all you guys for looking out for me. I'll keep you updated.
 

chimuelo

Star Of Stage & Screen
FWIW You can use Ryzen 3000s with ASRocks Workstation or Server motherboards.
These boards are X470 until they put out 570s.

But for our audio needs the ASPEED AT2500 Chip has plenty of RAM for Triple Monitors.

You lose the PCI-4 capability, and greedy bastards realize these are great motherboards for Ryzen 3000s so what I’ve usually paid 125-175 for are going for 450-500.
Not ASRocks fault, just the supply chain.

I use the little gem i7 5775C w/ GFX disabled so the AT2500 kicks on and covers even my pseudo 3D project window where hardware, ASIO and DSP work together.

When ASRock releases an X570 Server or Workstation board optimized for 1U Chassis it will be perfect for audio because everything is short traced, no blinking lights, no bells and whistles.
 
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pderbidge

pderbidge

Senior Member
I think Buildzoid's observations here point to why the idle temps tend to be higher with Ryzen 3000. Still doesn't explain why my load temps are so high though. When I get my replacement CPU this week I'll know if it was the chip or if I'm back to square one troubleshooting. What this does point out though is that you do not want any type of whiny sounding fan on this cpu because due to the boost algorithms it will constantly ramp up and down and just be annoying to listen to. It would be better to have a fan that is quiet at even high loads, like the Noctua and BEQuiet fans, to be set to run at faster speeds to begin with so they aren't constantly ramping. Also, set your case fans profile to only ramp with case temp rise and not CPU rise or you'll have an entire case of fans ramping up and down each time the cpu boosts up and down. I think early 9900k had similar issues? AMD still obviously has some work to do to resolve some of these quirks.

This just confirms my recommendation of the 9900k for most people who will likely have their PC in the same room they mix in. The Ryzen will require a little more effort to make quiet compared to a current Intel solution. It's not that bad for the average person but for musicians who seek an ultra quiet solution I think it will be easier to achieve with Intel for now.

 
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pderbidge

pderbidge

Senior Member
New update:

Pete has come up with some new testing regarding the impact that higher frequency memory with decent timings like CL16 has with Ryzen on Daw performance. Although it looks to be slight we are starting to finally see an impact. The key is to get a 1:1 ratio with the Infinity Fabric (the thing that communicates between chiplets on the die). That ideal frequency is 3733MHz. Going above 3600MHz is still expensive but if you are a confident memory overclocker (which is a bit tricky) then with the right type of memory you may be able to get there, however if you can't get the timings tight enough then it's probably best to leave it at 3600MHZ. http://www.scanproaudio.info/2019/07/30/ryzen-memory-testing-for-audio-does-it-make-an-impact/

I, however want to share some thoughts on working with cheaper memory since that's what I have and there are still some benefits to be had there as well. But first, an update to my cpu and cooling issue:

I received my new CPU yesterday and instead of going to bed early, like I should have due to the cold my daughter has graciously shared with the rest of the family, I decided to do some tests. First off, I can't really compare my new temps to the previous ones because of some changes I made to the system. I had originally ordered the Noctua NH-U14s without checking the compatability charts and didn't realize that it would overhang my x16 slot, so I was using my x4 slot for my graphics card. With the exchange of the CPU I had ordered a new Noctua cooler (I'll use the U14s on my old system and give it an overclock) which is now more compatible with my board. I ordered the NH-D15s and now all is well, other than the fact that you have to remove your entire motherboard to get this beast on.

The good news is, my temps are now 10c lower than they were, except at idle. Idle is still roughly the same. It's hard to say if it was the new cooler or the new Thermal Paste (Thermal Grizzly Kryonaut), or both that made the difference, or if it was actually the CPU. I suspect it was a little of everything. My temps, however, still jump up to 80c under full aida64 stress test load. That's better than 92c but still a bit hot for such a nice air cooling setup. I really don't think you could get any real meaningful overclocks with this cpu without an expensive AIO and even then I think the difference is marginal. I still think these readings are a bug in the either the new chipset or the new Bios. I'll be looking out for updates. As long as I'm below 80c I shouldn't see any throttling which was my main concern.

I won't go into detail since many reviewers with much more knowledge and proper test equipment have already confirmed what I validated for myself- which is the boost algorithms on this cpu are already aggressive enough that there is really no benefit to overclocking and voiding your warranty. Since these algorithms are the same for all their 3rd gen it doesn't make a whole lot of sense to spend more on a 3800X, even with it's higher stock clock speed, because it will boost about the same despite AMD's marketing on this. The all core boost will be the same and that single core 4.4Ghz high boost that AMD touts on the 3800x tends to only happen when the stars align according to reviews. This is one area where AMD should have been more conservative instead of making a lot of early adopters turned off when they weren't seeing those clock speeds. You're supposed to underpromise and overdeliver, not the other way around. It taints what is otherwise a really good processor.

Now to memory. Everyone knows that higher memory speeds with decent timings will benefit the infinity fabric but few have talked about those of us that already have cheaper DDR4 memory or didn't want to spend more than the cost of a 2400MHz kit. Apparently you can still get good results with low memory if you are willing to tighten the timings a bit. I have 2 corsair/Micron 32GB Vengeance kits (2x16) that are the same timings of 16-16-16-39. I was able to get a stable boost to 2666Mhz with timings of 14-15-15-39 at 1.3V and saw my Cinebench score jump 30 points consistently. I'm sure if I was a more advanced overclock-er I might be able to get much higher boost speeds or at least tighter timings. Probably tighter timings since I believe Micron is not known for its ability to boost very high. Although for DAW use I'm not sure the higher frequency will matter as much as the tighter timings, but then again it's all about getting the Infinity Fabric to communicate faster between chiplets so I guess if higher frequency accomplishes that with looser timings then that's the point.

My next test will be to see if maybe lowering my ram speed with tighter timings and doubling my Infinity fabric speed to have a 2:1 ratio might yield even better results. That means setting my ram frequency at 1050MHz and the infinity fabric at 2100MHz. I'll let you know if that works.

For those still on the fence about Ryzen Vs Intel, I'll leave you with another article by Pete. Although it would be unfair to say that there is definitive proof that Cubase performs better on INtel than AMD at this point it is what I would call a "safer bet". As a new Ryzen owner, it's a good thing I'm on Reaper:)

 
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Hi!
Glad you have now decent temps with your CPU! You can consider the problem solved because 80°c on heavy load is very good :) I think the new thermal paste + the D15 are responsible for downing your temps by ten degres. They are both very good and reliable material.

Concerning RAM, the benchmarks are always showing us that DRAM speed is important, but in real practise you don't notice any difference (slightly perhaps). So just grab the RAM that you can purchase , and save the money for your CPU, it wiil be fine!

:2thumbs:
 
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pderbidge

pderbidge

Senior Member
You can consider the problem solved because 80°c on heavy load is very good
You're right. I think that for an air cooling solution and given that I'm doing this in the middle of the hot season in a house without central air, the results are acceptable. I still maintain that the readings are due to AMD's aggressive communication with the system and bios. This has been discussed and documented by many others so I won't get into the details of it here.

Concerning RAM, the benchmarks are always showing us that DRAM speed is important, but in real practise you don't notice any different
I agree that this is made to seem much more significant that it is in real world practice, however, with Ryzens infinity fabric being dependent on Ram timings and speed to communicate between chiplets there is an argument to be made for getting ram and Infinity Fabric to be at a 1:1 ratio with each other. Even if you have super fast ram but the timings between "IF" and the ram don't match there will also be a performance hit. This is not the case for Intel which is both good and bad. Both technologies have their pros and cons. This is why I'm more fascinated with the idea of getting cheap ram tuned with the right timings to improve the communication of the infinity fabric. Of course, the sweet spot of 3600mhz ram with tight timings dialed in will be ideal, I still think there's a case to be made that doing the same with cheap ram can get close enough to where the difference is even more miniscule and show that the cost vs gains isn't worth spending more than the cost of 3200mhz ram which is the sweet spot in price right now and even saving money on cheaper ram may be worth it if you are willing to learn and tweak your ram.

In the end all this tweaking will make such little difference that it's probably not worth my time but I'm having fun geeking out so there's that😄
 
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pderbidge

pderbidge

Senior Member
I have done all the proper tests of my memory, SSD's, NVME's etc... and everything is stable.
Today I start transferring my music licenses to my new PC. I'm hoping it goes smooth. I'm not expecting it to go fast. Once I'm done I will be able to report on how everything works on the new Ryzen 7 3700x. I'm excited and a little nervous. So far I am impressed with how Ryzen optimizes workloads. Before transferring licenses I worked on optimizing Windows 10 for Music and with the AMD Ryzen performance profile enabled, most of the optimizations were already set to where they should be. That was great news. Back to work, you may not hear from me for a while.
 

kitekrazy

Senior Member
I have done all the proper tests of my memory, SSD's, NVME's etc... and everything is stable.
Today I start transferring my music licenses to my new PC. I'm hoping it goes smooth. I'm not expecting it to go fast. Once I'm done I will be able to report on how everything works on the new Ryzen 7 3700x. I'm excited and a little nervous. So far I am impressed with how Ryzen optimizes workloads. Before transferring licenses I worked on optimizing Windows 10 for Music and with the AMD Ryzen performance profile enabled, most of the optimizations were already set to where they should be. That was great news. Back to work, you may not hear from me for a while.
Did you buy a new copy of Windows 10 or did it come from a previous system.
 
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