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Udemy or Mike Verta?

Shiirai

Avian Member
I'm still going through the list, but just wanted to add that I think you guys should check out Ed Buller's list. First and last link in particular: Rick Beato and Adam Neely are must-see's.
I really like Adam Neely - he's like the Vsauce of music. You never know what he's going to talk about, and it might not always be relevant to composers, but it's super interesting IMO.
Seconding this, Neely is a hero and Rick Beato has the best name for a Youtubing Musician in the history of ever.

And his stuff is really good too.
 
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jaketanner

jaketanner

Senior Member
I have most of Mike's classes. If you're into TV and film scoring definitely get "How to score a film in 7 days" and "Scoring 1". They where the most useful and practical for me.
Gonna check them out. Been seeing the How to Score in 7 Days for a while. Just wasn’t sure it had the info about orchestrating and mock-ups that I was interested in. But will give it a second look.

Scoring 1 is already in my cart. :)
 

robgb

I was young once
Though, as I explained in a thread a couple months back when someone was asking what courses people have purchased, I find "low-quality, high price" is kinda the status quo on online courses.
I don't know. I've bought a view Udemy courses (in the design field) that I thought were very helpful. It really helps to watch the sample videos and look at the reviews to try and see what you're getting. Not all of it is junk. And the tutorial videos on other sites (Groove3, etc.) done by pros like Kenny Gioia, are excellent. As for prices, especially on Udemy, that high price is rarely charged. There always seems to be a sale on.
 

robgb

I was young once
How to Score in 7 Days
Don't expect a traditional course like you'd see from Groove3 or whatever. It's basically just Verta going through the score, step by step, and his thought processes, etc. And it happens to be a very, very good video.
 
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jaketanner

jaketanner

Senior Member
Don't expect a traditional course like you'd see from Groove3 or whatever. It's basically just Verta going through the score, step by step, and his thought processes, etc. And it happens to be a very, very good video.
Most likely will be a later purchase this month. I think I am gonna start on Scoring 1 and Theory, for the brush up. Then most likely How to Score in 7 Days, and orchestration 1.
 
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jaketanner

jaketanner

Senior Member
I don't know. I've bought a view Udemy courses (in the design field) that I thought were very helpful. It really helps to watch the sample videos and look at the reviews to try and see what you're getting. Not all of it is junk. And the tutorial videos on other sites (Groove3, etc.) done by pros like Kenny Gioia, are excellent. As for prices, especially on Udemy, that high price is rarely charged. There always seems to be a sale on.
I got an orchestration course for strings on Groove 3...it's boring and so basic...Not what I expected at all. However, the videos with Al Schmidt look pretty good...I have it downloaded, but haven't watched it yet.
 

ism

Senior Member
Alan Belkin's "Musical Composition Craft and Art" makes an excellent companion to all of this.

I really like Mike's approach of feeling his way through things experientially, but there's I think it's greatly enhanced and sharpened by texts that craft their pedagogy more finely. And Alan's book is really is a finely crafted, modern take. There's just no reason not to read something like this along side Mike's videos.
 
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ism

Senior Member
One More thought. In the way that I think Alan Belkin's book is a superb companion to Mike's Composition videos (and vice versa), Frank Lehman's "Hollywood Harmony" is a similarly superb companion to Mike's Williams, Horner and Goldsmith trilogy - or vice versa.

In fact I bought Mike's "On Horner" masterclass as a companion to Lehman, and together they're more than the sum of their parts.

Here's how I attempted to describe it over on this thread:

https://vi-control.net/community/threads/john-luther-adams-tundra-time-macro-and-the-neo-classical-manifesto.75476/


'Meanwhile, in Frank Lehman's (excellent) "Hollywood Harmony", we have this wonderfully useful demonstration of how simple Neo-Remannian analysis illuminates some very characteristic Hollywood gestures that resist conventional tonal analysis. The sort of gesture, for instance used to create a sense of awe or wonder, of the mystical or religious, functioning precisely by stepping outside of the preceding key structure. He thereby frames such gestures moment when an emphasis on the sonority of the chord (progression) overwhelms its conventional diatonic functioning.

Effectively restating this, in his (also excellent) "On Horner" masterclass, Mike Verta zeros in on the same sort of gesture in a Horner score, describing the effect as a

"F**k it, it's all about the moment"

kind of moment.

I find all of these to be very helpful, and rather eloquent in their own ways, approaches to expressing a dimension of music that I've long felt, but well, not found to be emphasized in traditional voice leading texts'
 

jbuhler

Senior Member
Meanwhile, in Frank Lehman's (excellent) "Hollywood Harmony", we have this wonderfully useful demonstration of how simple Neo-Remannian analysis illuminates some very characteristic Hollywood gestures that resist conventional tonal analysis. The sort of gesture, for instance used to create a sense of awe or wonder, of the mystical or religious, functioning precisely by stepping outside of the preceding key structure. He thereby frames such gestures moment when an emphasis on the sonority of the chord (progression) overwhelms its conventional diatonic functioning.
I find Lehman's book to be the best introduction to neo-Riemannian theory that we have. (The theory was developed to makes sense of the chromatic music of late 19th music, but is in many respects better suited to recent film music.) Highly recommended for anyone interested in the "logic" of harmony based around chromatic mediants (among other things). Scott Murphy has an excellent article that catalogues common Neo-Reimannian moves in film music. This appears in The Oxford Handbook to Film Music Studies, edited by David Neumeyer.
 
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ism

Senior Member
I find Lehman's book to be the best introduction to neo-Riemannian theory that we have. (The theory was developed to makes sense of the chromatic music of late 19th music, but is in many respects better suited to recent film music.) Highly recommended for anyone interested in the "logic" of harmony based around chromatic mediants (among other things). Scott Murphy has an excellent article that catalogues common Neo-Reimannian moves in film music. This appears in The Oxford Handbook to Film Music Studies, edited by David Neumeyer.

Also - shockingly readable, and fun.

Partly because it comes with a lot of really well chosen examples, that give it, maybe not quite the instant gratification and experiential qualities of masterclass by Mike, but it feels a lot closer to sharing those Verta-eque qualities than you'd think a 'theory' book has any right to.
 
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jaketanner

jaketanner

Senior Member
So I got Orchestration 1 and Theory 1...so far so good. I plan on getting either Composition or Scoring course as well as possibly by the end of the month.
 

midiman

Active Member
Mike is one of the best teachers of composition. I don't know the Udemy course in composition. But I cannot believe they would be better than Verta's. Mike Verta is a straight shooter. Listen what he says and you'll be on the way to becoming a better composer. And a better musician.
 
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jaketanner

jaketanner

Senior Member
Mike is one of the best teachers of composition. I don't know the Udemy course in composition. But I cannot believe they would be better than Verta's. Mike Verta is a straight shooter. Listen what he says and you'll be on the way to becoming a better composer. And a better musician.
Still need to get the composition class. Hopefully the sale is still on. Maybe I'll pick it up
 

Chr!s

Active Member
Alan Belkin's "Musical Composition Craft and Art" makes an excellent companion to all of this.

I really like Mike's approach of feeling his way through things experientially, but there's I think it's greatly enhanced and sharpened by texts that craft their pedagogy more finely. And Alan's book is really is a finely crafted, modern take. There's just no reason not to read something like this along side Mike's videos.
This is a good call. I've been reading a lot of Belkin's stuff lately. Is good.
 
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jaketanner

jaketanner

Senior Member
Can anyone tell me what the code is for the 40% off on Mike's courses? I lost my email. Thanks.
 
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