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The future of the daw composer

ThomasNL

Thomas van der Burg
Last night I went on one of my philosophical trips and this time i was thinking about the topic of the "laptop composer" or "DAW composer" and how it yields a certain degree of negativity among the more experienced composers.

While I certainly agree that making/producing music has become significantly easier - and as a result, pop-music and film-music becoming more generic and less complex - I think what we forget to realize is how short of a time-period the modern day composer/producer exists.

We are only three decades in, in this new era of composing/producing. I mean, Gregorian style music (which is seen as the start of classical music) was even simpler then most music today. I think we are very much at the beginning of a new era and should be a little more patient.

My bet is that for the coming years it will still become increasingly easier to produce music, even incorporating artificial intelligence in our routine, but eventually will hit a certain threshold and then the complexity will start to increase again.
While today, the DAW is still considered the "new tool", i think in the future it will be way more integrated in our society. Just having a computer to make music is only the start of the journey, like a musical instrument is now.

I'm very curious what you guys think of this. No idea what the bottom line would be but still wanted to share it with y'all :)

Have a nice day!
Thomas
 

Jerry Growl

Composing Music in the Plastic Dark Ages
My bet is that for the coming years it will still become increasingly easier to produce music, even incorporating artificial intelligence in our routine, but eventually will hit a certain threshold and then the complexity will start to increase again.
While today, the DAW is still considered the "new tool", i think in the future it will be way more integrated in our society. Just having a computer to make music is only the start of the journey, like a musical instrument is now.
Easier to make usually means cheaper to buy. And music (on most platforms) is already as cheap as air.

It also means new talent will have an even harder time getting spotted, not getting washed away by the tidal wave of easy clicking stick-wacking crap-spawning junkyard music, like what's going on on Soundcloud e.g. ... This is probably not philosophy, but rather called rambling.

I hope to one day replace midi with recorded brainwaves and a good A.I to make sense of it all. It would certainly lift the frustration of loosing the picture under the pencil.
 

Fredeke

Senior Member
I'm afraid you won't get much drama here, since most VI Controllers are DAW composers ;)

Anyway, I tend to agree - which is so boring...
 

mikeh-375

old school
I think Jacques Attali foresaw it back in 1977 in his book Noise. According to him, we are coming now into a new post-industrial stage of music production/consumption that is much more widespread and democratised. That's the Utopian viewpoint of it anyway.

"What is noise to the old order is harmony to the new."

http://web.mnstate.edu/gracyk/courses/aesthetics of music/attali'snoise.htm
Your quote from the link about noise and the rest of the paragraph it belongs to in the link, sums up rather nicely the dilemma that contemporary art music has with its audience and a dilemma every serious composer has to address.
The distance travelled into ones own creative "codes" is probably proportional to a diminishing audience receptivity to the internal "noise" (harmony!) found....simply put, the more dissonant (exhaustive a search of the code!), the less likely an audience.
 
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Fredeke

Senior Member

ghostnote

Vincit qui se vincit.
Last night I went on one of my philosophical trips and this time i was thinking about the topic of the "laptop composer" or "DAW composer" and how it yields a certain degree of negativity among the more experienced composers.
You know, beeing someone who just creates music with the computer has a more negative image amongst people than someone who really can play an instrument properly.
 

eph221

Member
I think creativity works on punctuated equillibrium. Historically, music moved more slowly, following the other arts(classical, romantic etc.) Now music is no longer working at that glacial pace and has the opportunity to be at the forefront of aesthetic movements. We're seeing some spectacular things these days. There's always the good with the bad.. and the awful premise that the arts are purely subjective and relative to others. :D
 
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