Switching from FL Studio to another DAW

Vehrka

New Member
Hello, I've been using FL Studio since I started producing and composing (I don't compose professionally). Now I know it's really not the best for composing but it's what I'm comfortable with and I know it inside and out. However, I want to start exploring other DAWs and switch away from FL Studio. I did have a couple of questions regarding other DAWs though before I start diving into them. So...

1. I LOVE the step sequencer/channel rack and I haven't really seen any other DAW with anything like it. So is this just something I'll have to give up if I switch or are there actually other DAWs out there with something similar to this?

2. Between Ableton, Cubase, DP, and Studio One, which one would you say is the easiest to switch to in terms of workflow? Does it not really matter which one I switch to or are there ones that are just simply above and beyond the others?
 

EvilDragon

KSP Wizard
FL is the odd one out as far as workflow is concerned, other DAWs might have some segments of FL's workflow, but not quite in the same way. All DAWs you listed except Live are of traditional linear sequencer type, whereas Ableton can be a bit non-linear because of its clip launcher mode (something FL subsequently copied), and that's a completely different paradigm compared to how FL operates...
 

ranaprathap

Active Member
If you are planning to switch from Fl Studio then you need to think what is it that you want that Fl can't provide. If you mention that, then the people here will be able to help you better.
 
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Vehrka

New Member
If you are planning to switch from Fl Studio then you need to think what is it that you want that Fl can't provide. If you mention that, then the people here will be able to help you better.
Well for one, setting up Omnisphere and Kontakt can be a real pain in FL Studio just because of the way it makes you use a different MIDI Out for each instance. Automation can be a pain sometimes depending on what you're trying to automate (especially in Omnisphere). Also, although I love the mixer, I've seen posts where people say it is inferior to other DAWs.

I'm not 100% sure I'll switch yet, but like I said, I want to explore other DAWs and see if I like them enough to start learning them.
 

muziksculp

Senior Member
Take a look at Presonus Studio One Pro 3 , imho. it offers a great, and speedy workflow, it's easy to setup Kontakt , and other VSTs, and HW Synth, outboard effects, ...etc. very good audio and midi editing features, arranger features, great sounding built-in plug-ins, and many other cool features.

http://www.presonus.com/products/Studio-One
 

ranaprathap

Active Member
because of the way it makes you use a different MIDI Out for each instance
For a multi patch instrument like kontakt it is necessary to route different MIDI inputs to play different patches even though the routing process is simpler in Cubase and Much simpler in Reaper.

I love the mixer, I've seen posts where people say it is inferior to other DAWs
If the reason people say the mixer is inferior is due to the "audio engine" then don't fall for that BS. If there are any convenience factors that you are looking for (not having to route each instrument to individual mixer channel was a big convenience factor I was looking for) then that is a valid reason.
I want to explore other DAWs and see if I like them enough to start learning them.
No matter whatever DAW you choose, get ready to seriously miss Fl Studio's piano roll, and pattern based workflow if you like it.
1. Cubase - So many people use it, hence it is a reason to check out. There is a free 1 month Demo of the elements version. If you want to go the pro route get ready to sacrifice one USB port on your computer. When you start using this you will appreciate how easy it is to do some things that were very difficult with FL like routing things.
2. Reaper - Extremely customizable and very low on system resources. Offering an unrestricted trial and very cheap if you decide to buy it. Get ready to fiddle around with some custom scripts to get what you want. If you know exactly what you want, chances are that you can get it done with this DAW.
3. Studio One - I am yet to try this one out. I hear the workflow is very fast and user friendly. I hear that some of the MIDI capabilities are yet to catch on with Cubase levels. Offering a trial too. It used to be a system resource hog but they have fixed it in the recent version. And I like how it looks.
 

elpedro

Active Member
I like ableton for non-linear stuff, cubase for linear (unbeatable in midi capabilities). Still mix in my old samplitude prox 9.Different horses for courses.If I had to choose just one, ATM it would be Cubase
 

sekkosiki

Senior Member
Well for one, setting up Omnisphere and Kontakt can be a real pain in FL Studio just because of the way it makes you use a different MIDI Out for each instance.
Just for this reason I switched to another DAW from FL Studio. I started to setup an orchestral template with FL Studio, which took a lot of time and the Midi Outs are truly a pain in the ... After all that hassle, the template wasn't stable, thus I moved to a different DAW, Cubase. I haven't regretted since, though I still miss FL's piano roll and pattern based workflow. I haven't tried other DAWs though, so my opinion is biased.
 

EvilDragon

KSP Wizard
By the way, most of FL's piano roll facilities, at least the way the mouse works, can be replicated in Reaper with its mouse modifiers... AFAIK can't do that in Cubase and the like - the only other DAW I know of that has this kind of functionality (but not sure if as deep as in Reaper) is Sonar.
 

James Marshall

Senior Memer
By the way, most of FL's piano roll facilities, at least the way the mouse works, can be replicated in Reaper with its mouse modifiers...
I'm curious, what are these FL piano roll features you're trying to replicate? Could you let me know how you have it set up in your workflow? Cheers!
 

creativeforge

Barefoot Heart Music
A humble shout out for the DAW I've been using for a year or so.
http://www.acoustica.com/mixcraft/music-recording-software.php

Free trial, affordable full version. I like it because of visual cues for GUI, the MIDI routing is no-nonsense (i.e. I could figure it out rather quickly). I don't use their VSTs but they offer a lot to start you off. I was using Reaper before, I just compared my workflow with before and I stuck with Mixcraft. Your millage may vary. I doubt many people know about it or use it here, so I try to bring it up from time to time... No harm trying! :)

I don't do music professionally for movies or media, just solo projects.

EDIT: I use mainly Kontakt, Omnisphere, Ivory II, PadShop Pro and Alchemy.
 

EvilDragon

KSP Wizard
I'm curious, what are these FL piano roll features you're trying to replicate? Could you let me know how you have it set up in your workflow? Cheers!
Just the way left and right mouse buttons are working, for example, and which actions are carried out when you press Ctrl, Alt, Shift, or any of their combinations.

I don't have an exact copy of FLS piano roll mouse modifiers in Reaper, I made it work how I primarily wanted it to work. Which is not entirely how FLS works.
 

chibear

Active Member
A humble shout out for the DAW I've been using for a year or so.
http://www.acoustica.com/mixcraft/music-recording-software.php

Free trial, affordable full version. I like it because of visual cues for GUI, the MIDI routing is no-nonsense (i.e. I could figure it out rather quickly). I don't use their VSTs but they offer a lot to start you off. I was using Reaper before, I just compared my workflow with before and I stuck with Mixcraft. Your millage may vary. I doubt many people know about it or use it here, so I try to bring it up from time to time... No harm trying! :)

I don't do music professionally for movies or media, just solo projects.

EDIT: I use mainly Kontakt, Omnisphere, Ivory II, PadShop Pro and Alchemy.
I have to add a big +1. I've been using Mixcraft since version 5 (now on 8) and now also use DP.

DP is a monster, massively powerful, but also coming with a large learning curve. Routing is time consuming but logical and the piano roll editing and automation is to die for imo. I'm still getting my head around the workflow, but right now it looks like I'll be working from templates exclusively because of the setup time.

With Mixcraft, on the other hand, as a total novice I watched 2 videos and was writing the first day. I didn't even need to look at the manual until the third day (whereas in DP I need to memorize a large chunk of the 1000 pages). Setting up multitimbrals and multichannel VSTi's is a snap although I've had no problems in DP either (there is a video on setting up Kontakt in Mixcraft on my YouTube channel). BUT the routing is virtually automatic, making Mixcraft blazing fast to work with as compared to any DAW I've tried (I've written templates but rarely use them because of the ease of setup), including FL Studio. The small amount of video scoring I do is also a snap. It's weaknesses are in the areas of primitive scoring, piano roll editing, and automation editing features, particularly the lack of the ability to draw CC# lines or curves or curves in the automation lanes.
 
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EvilDragon

KSP Wizard
It's weaknesses are in the areas of primitive scoring, piano roll editing, and automation editing features, particularly the lack of the ability to draw CC# lines or curves or curves in the automation lanes.
That's, like, one of the most important things, really. Eh.
 

chibear

Active Member
That's, like, one of the most important things, really. Eh.
Scoring depends on whether you intend to work with live musicians or not. The other things can be overcome in Kontakt using host automation. The biggest thing for me is the lack if curves which does impact product quality from my perception, but I've been told by more than one person I overthink my work :P so it may not matter as much to other people.
 

noxtenebrae17

Active Member
DP offers a free 30-day trial. I'd recommend at least trying it. I've been using it for 10 years and I love it. The only other DAW's I know well are Logic and Pro Tools, and I prefer DP over those hands down. I mainly do MIDI/VI work but work with live performances here and there as well. DP's MIDI editor is awesome.

Here's the link: http://motu.com/download
 

creativeforge

Barefoot Heart Music
That's, like, one of the most important things, really. Eh.
Since I do use music notation, it's not an issue for me, but it would be one for many. As for MIDI editing, so far so good on my end. I'll check others though. There must be good reasons people are ready to pay so much for certain DAWs.
 

chibear

Active Member
There must be good reasons people are ready to pay so much for certain DAWs.
Years ago I asked on another forum "So what do I get for my extra $500?" At that time the 'experts' had very few meaningful answers. After getting a little more fluent in DP I should be in a position to answer that at least from my perspective. In fact it would probably make a good video: 'Mixcraft vs DP: What do I get for my extra $500?' a good way to get both sides to hate me :grin:
 
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Vehrka

New Member
Just the way left and right mouse buttons are working, for example, and which actions are carried out when you press Ctrl, Alt, Shift, or any of their combinations.

I don't have an exact copy of FLS piano roll mouse modifiers in Reaper, I made it work how I primarily wanted it to work. Which is not entirely how FLS works.
I've heard a lot of good things about DP's midi capabilities. Is it really that good? Because I only work with midi at the moment? Is on par with Cubase? And if so, why is it so good?