Studio One - Why no professional endorsements?

I know pros in LA who still use ProTools and hate every second of it, but still use it because... everybody is using it. Some PT diehards can't take it anymore and are switching to Logic. When I show them what Studio One can do, they are shocked/baffled/amazed but still won't switch because... well... because...
That's because switching to another working environment requires lots of mental energy - you have to evaluate gains and loses first(eg if switching to a particular DAW worth it to change your habits and to abandon already burnt into brain knowledge of your present DAW). For a pro it's a very time and energy consuming process - you literally have to make lists of things you do in a program and how you do them; then you have to try it in considerable option(s). Then you can get approximate evaluation of potentially new workflow and make at least half of the decision(will you drop the idea of switching to this DAW; will you keep working on your present DAW, but use the new one from time to time until you can make a final decision; you're convinced and ready to switch). After this you'll face one problem(even if you decided to switch now) - certain instruments and techniques you used in previous daw and how to get them in a new one - can you replace it with the new toolset or maybe some of those I's and T's not that important and you can achieve the same or better results with provided toolset instead of trying to replicate what you were doing so far in the previous host. And finally you'll have to repeat the process of burning control of the daw into your brain(which includes reading manual, watching since videos, trying things out, learning/assinging hot keys and so on).

I described this switching event in a very-very broad and generalized way, but you can see that this is a complex process. This is very rare when people over 50 are willing to get through all of that again. If should be something revolutionary to make the switch a no-brainer. This is one of the reasons why we shouldn't focus on the "old squad"(no offense, besides we all gonna be there sooner or later😉)..

Finally, everyone I know, who switched to S1, put the main emphasize on streamline workflow of S1. That was the reason I switched, too. I myself think that gains in comfort and speed is much more than that time I spent on all the mentioned activities.
 

dcoscina

Senior Member
@Faruh Al-Baghdadi i am over 50 and have switched to S1 and I write largely orchestral music. I also adopted Staffpad this year as my main compositional tool. I have no problem adapting to new tech. The only exception is Ableton. That thing is just not up my alley for the kind of music I write.
S1 is great because I can save presets, build my own KS, use the single pane to move around and avoid multiple windows... I love it. And the notation editor is great!
 

chocobitz825

Senior Member
I don't know what endorsements would mean for people since using the same gear and software doesn't mean you get the same results. From my experience, most songwriters I know use either cubase or studio one. I have mix engineers who use studio one instead of pro tools. I know another engineer who just switched from pro tools to Studio One last month for live performances when studio one added the Show Page.

All the professionals I know who use it, love it. My own team of international producers and writers have all gathered around studio one since sphere dropped because even before sphere, project sharing was insanely easy on studio one. For me, once they add a better video player, there won't be much more I really desperately need. Still, even with what's there, I worked a film score remotely with no problems on studio one 4.
 
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chocobitz825

Senior Member
Fair point! Maybe WE are the future "pros" who will eventually standardize it? 😉

I hope we never have standardized DAWS ever again. I can't stand how Pro Tools has taken that position and forces people to use it even when its lagging behind certain features in other DAWs. What I'd rather see is a standardized file format like AAF, but better, that allows us to share projects between DAWs with little functionality lost. That way we could all keep the DAWs we like, but never have to force others to use the same just in order to work together.
 

ThomasL

Senior Member
Switched from several years of Logic use to Studio One a few years back. Mainly because of the integration with Softube Console 1. Anyhow, at first I didn't think it was "there" either but after a while I understood that it was me that wasn't "there".

Habits die hard. They die (or rather change) faster if you're willing to let go and you have a mindset that allows you to do so.

Haven't regretted the switch a single second. The "bugfix" they did a few versions back that made it possible to export stems/tracks in the correct way for Pro Tools users was great, works every time :)
 

samphony

Senior Member
I don't know what endorsements would mean for people since using the same gear and software doesn't mean you get the same results. From my experience, most songwriters I know use either cubase or studio one. I have mix engineers who use studio one instead of pro tools. I know another engineer who just switched from pro tools to Studio One last month for live performances when studio one added the Show Page.

All the professionals I know who use it, love it. My own team of international producers and writers have all gathered around studio one since sphere dropped because even before sphere, project sharing was insanely easy on studio one. For me, once they add a better video player, there won't be much more I really desperately need. Still, even with what's there, I worked a film score remotely with no problems on studio one 4.
I have some feature requests i would love to see fulfilled in the 5 cycle. Set sync point/anchor in audio events, multiple videos&video thumbnail tracks, a global range selection workflow similar to pro tools. But still what Studio One has grown to is just inspiring and intuitive. #loveit
 

Ashermusic

Senior Member
Switched from several years of Logic use to Studio One a few years back. Mainly because of the integration with Softube Console 1. Anyhow, at first I didn't think it was "there" either but after a while I understood that it was me that wasn't "there".

Habits die hard. They die (or rather change) faster if you're willing to let go and you have a mindset that allows you to do so.

Haven't regretted the switch a single second. The "bugfix" they did a few versions back that made it possible to export stems/tracks in the correct way for Pro Tools users was great, works every time :)
While there is much I like, I would not give up having Logic's Smart Tempo, Quick Sampler, and Drummer, all fairly recent additions. The new Step Sequencer and Live Loops are a big deal for some, not for me.
 

samphony

Senior Member
Same with me why giving up something you like. But for me i use what inspires. Meaning creating stuff in logic and bringing it into Studio One is a daily routine since 2010 sometimes even Studio One to Logic or both side by side but i must say i prefer the audio editing and arranger track and scratch pad workflow in studio one. Anyways as with instruments I feel there is no need to switch use all of the ones you like. It is just a matter of workflow and creativity.
I know a lot of people especially here still believe one day one daw will rule them all but I believe workarounds and flexibility can empower creativity!
 

Ashermusic

Senior Member
Same with me why giving up something you like. But for me i use what inspires. Meaning creating stuff in logic and bringing it into Studio One is a daily routine since 2010 sometimes even Studio One to Logic or both side by side but i must say i prefer the audio editing and arranger track and scratch pad workflow in studio one. Anyways as with instruments I feel there is no need to switch use all of the ones you like. It is just a matter of workflow and creativity.
I know a lot of people especially here still believe one day one daw will rule them all but I believe workarounds and flexibility can empower creativity!
That's actually very cool, but I fear that at my advanced age going back and forth would have me using two inefficiently :)
 

chocobitz825

Senior Member
While there is much I like, I would not give up having Logic's Smart Tempo, Quick Sampler, and Drummer, all fairly recent additions. The new Step Sequencer and Live Loops are a big deal for some, not for me.
some things are just vital to a person's workflow. I haven't tried logic recently to know how different the quick sample is compared to studio one's SampleOne. Quick Tempo sounds like a great feature, but I've done the same using melodyne's tempo map function in studio one to do the same. Drummer is the only thing I know studio one doesn't have an equivalent for but having more than enough drum software that's something I'll have to try to see if its more useful.
 

Babe

Member
I’ve been eyeing Studio One lately.

As a Reaper user who typically programs in MIDI by hand in the piano roll or notation view, what does Studio One offer that could make workflows more efficient?
I too am I draw it in midi guy. I've used Cubase, Logic, and demoed Reaper several times. IMO, S1 is far superior to Reaper for drawing in midi. Setting up tracks and using automation is sooooo much easier. I am disappointed in the score editor in S1 however. I use it mainly to check my to make sure I entered the right notes in the piano roll. I haven't figured out how to change the pitch by a 1/2 step. But you can't beat Reaper's price and upgrade policy.
 

chocobitz825

Senior Member
I too am I draw it in midi guy. I've used Cubase, Logic, and demoed Reaper several times. IMO, S1 is far superior to Reaper for drawing in midi. Setting up tracks and using automation is sooooo much easier. I am disappointed in the score editor in S1 however. I use it mainly to check my to make sure I entered the right notes in the piano roll. I haven't figured out how to change the pitch by a 1/2 step. But you can't beat Reaper's price and upgrade policy.
FYI, Studio One has a ton of great macros for the draw-it-in types. there are actually two macropages on exchange that can automate most of the editing process between quantise, not length, transpose, automated chords and inversions.
 

Daidy

New Member
About 3 years ago, I added my "voice" to request compatibility with Komplete Kontrol hardware. Still not there although it's quite a popular hardware (and a huge part of my workflow). I really like the S1 UI but so far, it wouldn't allow me to work faster, it's the opposite. One day, maybe 😊
Are you looking for something specific ? Because there is already a good integration with Komplete Kontrol : https://blog.presonus.com/index.php/2020/01/17/komplete-kontrol-integration-studio-one-part-13/
 

Trensharo

New Member
Cakewalk added Articulation Maps and can import Cubase Expression Maps. I think that was the smartest implementation of this in a non-Cubase or Logic Pro X DAW, yet.

People are just going to Steinberg or VSL websites and the expression Maps are importing and working 100% out of the box.

I actually went Cubase over Studio One because I don't like the UI. Its a bit too flat, and it feels like ACID Pro to me. I have to enjoy working in a DAW, otherwise its going to mess with my motivation.

Apart from that, Cubase has stronger facilities for working with Audio, and 25% of my business involes a ton of audio editing.

I think people underrate how much of an impact switching DAW platforms can have on one's productivity. Some people have hardware that works optimally with specific DAWs, as well. For many, it simply isn't worth the effort. Professionals at the upper end of the market aren't really into fan wars.
 

madfloyd

Active Member
I use Studio One and save for a year when I decided that I needed to try Cubase, I've been with it since its infancy.

Before Studio One existed I used Cakewalk.

I haven't been able to learn Cubase. Everything seems hidden and after a year of stumbling and not producing anything, I gave up.

Then Studio One added articulations and I rejoiced. It needs to be improved but I'm so happy that it's there.

I do wish Studio One looked better. I love the crispness of the Cubase UI (fonts etc) whereas Studio One feels a little blurry (I'm in my late 50s) but the workflow is just so simple and intuitive for me.