Stop what your doing and buy this book now !

Discussion in 'Composition, Orchestration & Technique' started by ed buller, Jun 5, 2018.

  1. brek

    brek Senior Member

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  2. OP
    OP
    ed buller

    ed buller Senior Member

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    SANTA MONICA
    yes the same thing happened to me a few years ago. Who knows if the composers thought this way......but the music certainly hints at that tonal approach and by applying these disciplines i was suddenly able to write music that sounded "Hollywood"

    best

    e
     
    wbacer likes this.
  3. OP
    OP
    ed buller

    ed buller Senior Member

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    SANTA MONICA

    This is a very useful Link. Here is the basic idea as a four voice piano part. I had my voice leading checked by Frank !

    Basically it's his breakdown of how abrupt modulations seem to happen in Hollywood. An essential trick I think and very well researched . Tis a good world with Frank in it !


    best

    ed
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Jun 12, 2018
  4. Dewdman42

    Dewdman42 Senior Member

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    I have some academic papers laying around here somewhere that were written by Frank Lehman. Browsing through this book, it seems that some of it is expounding upon the earlier work. I agree its quite academic in nature...but worth a read if you're into that sort of thing.
     
  5. alexd

    alexd Member

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    Jun 11, 2018
    Purchased! Thank YOU!!!!
     
  6. Dewdman42

    Dewdman42 Senior Member

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    tmhuud and fixxer49 like this.
  7. Stevie

    Stevie Senior Member

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    I'm in Germany, that's why I was wondering:
    Mine will arrive end of June.
     
  8. fretti

    fretti Senior Member

    Yeah, for me it shows release date 15th of June and then ~14 days of shipping (Germany), but only when I search for the book on the german Amazon site (then also no shipping fees). Through the link on page 1 it would also be 1-2 months:)

    Anyways: bought the ebook. making myself ready to dig in in a few weeks, thanks for the suggestion @ed buller :)
     
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  9. bryla

    bryla Senior Member

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    Ordered mine from .co.uk
    Delivery before June 15th.

    I'm a little bit skeptic to this book as the text seems very academic, but have a summer to read it :)
     
  10. OP
    OP
    ed buller

    ed buller Senior Member

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    Mar 23, 2011
    SANTA MONICA

    It is rather, but well worth getting to grips with. It's very complete so there is a lot of supporting DATA to look at . But the patterns and musical choices become very obvious after a while and you'll really see the synatx and grammer of the Hollywood language .........

    if not you know where I live


    best

    ed
     
  11. jfino

    jfino Senior Member

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    Jan 10, 2017
    Seems like an interesting read!
     
  12. all ears

    all ears Active Member

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    I'm also waiting for my paper version which is due to arrive at the end of the month.
    But the comments about its theoretical bias are getting me a bit concerned (Riemann? - I only know Riemann integrals). Any hints on how to fill the knowledge gaps for someone having knowledge only in more basic theory of harmony?
    And maybe we could have a Q&A thread here for those struggling with specific questions when working through the book?
     
  13. OP
    OP
    ed buller

    ed buller Senior Member

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    SANTA MONICA
    Ok


    don't be scared.....

    watch this :



    then this :



    this:



    grab a beer ...then this :



    and this:



    finally this :

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OdVhA19P4-4&t=13s

    all these videos deal with connecting chords without using what is called Harmonic Function. So these chords don't have a sense of direction in them like these chords do .....

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eurOGIiArHI

    the reason this is soooooo useful in "HOLLYWOOD MUSIC" is that we don't want to add music that is distracting and has a built in sense of direction. In fact quite the opposite. We want music to tread water sometimes or have a specific color like AWE.....C Maj to F# Maj ....

    this book is a pretty complete explanation of how and why composers for the last 80 years have relied so heavily on "non-functional Harmony" . It is very dense in places but it's all in the book. There really is nothing else you need....and if you can digest it you'll understand why this :

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gFDM7JGHGYo

    is sooooooo fantastic.

    If your Functional Harmony needs a brush up. this IS the best book. Short and and to the point :


    Rimsky Korsakov Harmony, a Practical Guide
    https://www.amazon.com/gp/offer-lis...?ie=UTF8&condition=used&qid=1529025643&sr=8-1




    best

    ed
     
  14. Dewdman42

    Dewdman42 Senior Member

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    I would just like to say one thing though, what does "functional" mean according to how you expressed it above? Mainly in film music we tend to need to avoid "cadences", which generally come from tritone resolution or implied by close association; and has an emotional impact that something is being "resolved". Aside from that, anything goes. In classical and pop music, cadences are all over the place and we're very used to hearing it. There is a time and place in a film cue for a cadence, for the express purpose of creating a feeling of "ending" to something, small or large. But often we have to make music go on and on, without actually resolving, yet still bringing the emotional tone that is desired.

    Neo-Reimannian theory just provides a way to connect chords you wouldn't otherwise think of connecting, and creating patterns also, which are neither diatonic, nor cadential. Yet they have structure... is that "functional"?

    There are some similar approaches out there which don't fit easily on the tonnetz graph also, and still work, so I personally found the Neo-Riemann thought process at first quite interesting but ultimately I decided it was also a bit limiting by being restricted to such a tonnetz graph. I spent quite a bit of time trying lots of repeating patterns on the tonnetz and found a few, but once you know the ones that generally work, then you don't really need to mess around with such academics IMHO. most of what I found on a tonnetz chart can also be analyzed using modal interchange, which I find a more musical approach.
     
    Last edited: Jun 14, 2018
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  15. OP
    OP
    ed buller

    ed buller Senior Member

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    SANTA MONICA
    Functional as I used it, is chords falling into three categories. Tonic, Pre-Dominant and Dominant . This includes Chromatic chords such as Neapolitan's and Augmented Sixes . It is the driving force behind music from the 17th Century to the mid 19th. Then things got weird.......Neo-Riemannian Theory has many faults . Chords using more than 3 notes being the most obvious but as explanations go in the pursuit behind a clearer idea of chord choices it's pretty useful. It has been expanded upon recently and two excellent books spring to mind. "THE GEOMETRY OF MUSIC" and "AUDACIOUS HARMONY" are well worth having .

    as to whether music having structure is "functional " in the examples you give I would say not. "Functional" to me means traditional harmony. Basically Diatonic. Even Chromatic harmony is functional and still has a distinct sense of key and Cadential activity.

    as to using modal interchange ...that's fine...but to be honest I suspect when you come up with patterns you like it's no longer what I would call functional harmony...........

    None of this maters of course....do what you want...it's really quite tiresome when theory gets involved but I did find learning the hollywood style of music very hard from normal textbooks . And that includes Modal Interchange !. This is the first book I've read that lays it all out and go's to great lengths to explain what we are hearing.

    Of course it should be said that there are other techniques that Hollywood has used that are distinct from this. Pitch Set theory springs to mind. As well as some basic Twelve tone and various Aleatoric sounds. Close Encounters is a good example of a buffet of tricks from Strauss to Ligeti . This book doesn't really deal with those but Hexatonic, Octotonic collections and smaller cells are there. And again the chords that make up so many great Jerry Goldsmith Ostinatos are cataloged .

    best

    ed
     
    Last edited: Jun 14, 2018
    Kevin Fortin likes this.
  16. Dewdman42

    Dewdman42 Senior Member

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    staying within the realm of what most people would consider "tonal" is what I think this book deals with more so then pitch sets and stuff like that. its just some methods for straying outside the realm of what you are describing above as "functional", outside of simple diatonic, yet not that far from the tonal tree.

    From post-romantic period on, most universities do not have a good basis for analyzing a lot of music that came out after that, they just say "oh well its chromatic now", with very little way to interpret it analytically in terms of structure. Eventually it led later to truly post tonal material with pitch sets and all that stuff, but the period in between is what the lionshare of film music is mimicking and what Neo-Riemann attempts to analyze in a structural way.

    I have some white papers I got off the net that get into this stuff with or without Neo-Riemmannian analysis, analyzing John Williams, Star Trek and other classic movies that use these kinds of harmonic movements, but I can't find them right now. If I can find them and/or the links I will post here later.

    Lehman's book does not appear to be strictly about Neo-Riemannian theory, by the way. But its definitely major portion of it.
     
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  17. Dewdman42

    Dewdman42 Senior Member

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  18. brek

    brek Senior Member

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    Tbh, I had just been glossing over any mentions of NRT, waiting for an explanation that hasn't come. So those links were super helpful, Ed.
    It's a much simpler concept than the name would lead you to believe, and intuitively familiar to almost anyone who has ever broken down a film cue.
     
    ed buller likes this.
  19. Dewdman42

    Dewdman42 Senior Member

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  20. OP
    OP
    ed buller

    ed buller Senior Member

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    SANTA MONICA
    Oh I remember this. The cowboy Cadence is classic Modal Interchange . Defiantly not NRT. In fact ( and we are now wandering above my pay-grade ) i'd say JW uses Modal interchange more frequently than NRT like say Goldsmith . He seems to wrap it up in his jazz chops . An again my knowledge of functional Harmony let's me down here but quite often a JW piece is much better explained using that term . Jurassic Park springs to mind.

    best

    e
     

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