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Steinberg SpectraLayers Pro 6 - opinions?

Vonk

Member
I'll admit that I have an innate prejudice in favouring one's ears when mixing rather than eyes. My initial reaction to Spectralayers is that it is an advanced tool that in the wrong hands (mine), is just a colourful way to risk screwing up a mix. Steinberg draw the analogy with Photoshop (which I know well) but I feel the temptation of working with the visual might be counterproductive - you edit to suit the image not the sound.
Anyone with experience of Spectralayers want to show me the error of my thinking, and why this is a useful tool for an orchestral composer that is worth the money?.
 

nglez

New Member
it's not, it is not a mixing tool, I think the video is a bit misleading. it's similar to izotope RX, mostly used for post production work. Only real practical scenario I can think of is to remove unwanted noise from a recording or preparing recordings if you make a sample library.
 

wst3

my office these days
Moderator
It is a remarkable tool, and I suppose you could extend it to mix, but mostly, as mentioned above, it is an editing/repair tool. I've used it, back when Sound Forge owned it (well, whoever owned Sound Forge that week). I think the price far exceeds the utility. It is simply another view of audio data, and one that - for me at least - just isn't all that necessary most of the time.

And, at least to this curmudgeon, audio editing and mixing should be done with the ears, not the eyes. One can, given enough experience, get close with the eyes. One needs a lot less experience to do the same with one's ears.

I believe that, for the most part, I can still make edits faster, and more accurately, with a razor blade. The difference continues to shrink, but it is finite.

Now what I can NOT do with a razor blade - not anywhere near as quickly or accurately - is "undo", and thus our current tools do provide us with the opportunity to try many ideas. That's a good thing.

And one day I may even grow accustomed to the computer version of "rocking the reels" to locate the edit point. If you don't know what that means just ignore me, but dang, that would be nice!
 

benmrx

Senior Member
I don’t know SpectraLayers (yet), but I use RX nearly every day at work. Certainly not as a mixing tool though. De-noising, click removal, getting rid of squeaks, squawks, birds, hum, buzz, boosting/lowering harmonics, etc.

Plus it’s an AMAZING sound design tool.

I’m extremely curious about the workflow of SpectraLayers with Nuendo and what it has to offer. I’ve been told there will be a demo available within a week or two.
 

benatural

Active Member
Ended up buying it, but haven't tried it yet. I also own RX Advanced... so why, you may ask, did I buy Spectral Layers too? Convenience! Making a spectral edit directly in Nuendo is a time saver and more convenient compared to using RX connect. That said, RX has a ton of features spectral layers doesn't have. Both have their place imo.
 

benmrx

Senior Member
Ended up buying it, but haven't tried it yet. I also own RX Advanced... so why, you may ask, did I buy Spectral Layers too? Convenience! Making a spectral edit directly in Nuendo is a time saver and more convenient compared to using RX connect. That said, RX has a ton of features spectral layers doesn't have. Both have their place imo.
Would love to hear your thoughts after you’ve had a chance to dig in more!
 

Dietz

Space Explorer
Spectral Layers's main benefit is that it scrolls through the sonogram lightning fast. Great for visual insight and comparisons. The slowness of the display is my only real gripe when talking about RX Advanced 7 - which plays in a different league, otherwise.
 
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