Steal the show with this concept for a basic layer which sounds amazing. You can learn to play it live on a piano within minutes!

gh0stwrit3r

Active Member
In September 2020 I started doing orchestral sketches. Just writing 4 bars of music. Trying things out, experimenting, learning, willing to understand what's happening and why certain things work and others don't. Building up a library of musical snippets which you can use when you need to be ready.

It's a practical exercise - DOING without judgement - with a slight touch of theory in it.
I love doing it, hopefully you enjoy it too.

LATEST SKETCH



PLAYLIST WITH ALL THE SKETCHES

 
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gh0stwrit3r

gh0stwrit3r

Active Member
I’m very excited about this orchestral sketch. This time I ended up with an end result I probably gonna use in one of my own compositions. Or a derivation of it. It just turned out wonderfully. But that’s just my humble opinion.

Unlike last week’s sketch, this time I had an idea what I was looking for. I wanted a magical feeling. An enchanting feeling. I’m not going to say ‘Christmas’, but hey ... 4allCoda and I agree that it’s always good to be in a Christmas mood ;)

  1. 00:54 - First listening (melody line and orchestrated version)
  2. 02:20 - The melody line I started with
  3. 03:55 - SATB writing (Soprano, Alto, Tenor and Bass)
  4. 05:12 - Development (counterpoint, feeling and trial & error)
  5. 07:10 - Decoration (some excitement for a magical touch)
  6. 08:24 - Orchestration (the symphonic version with a lovely choir)

 
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gh0stwrit3r

gh0stwrit3r

Active Member
Recently I started working on a new composition. One that starts quietly with a beautiful children choir slowly working towards the first transition. And that is what this orchestral sketch is about: sketching out a four bar tutti transition.
  1. 00:55 - First listening (start on the piano and orchestrated version)
  2. 02:13 - Start on the piano (tonic, dominant & resolution)
  3. 03:30 - The A Chord (let's make it bigger than life!)
  4. 04:48 - Orchestration (the symphonic version I ended up with)
 

bryla

Orchestrator
I would suggest you use the horns rather than trombones as the bridge to the trumpet and revoice the viola to C#4 A4 maybe and have woodwinds to match strings.
Trombone uses tenor clef - not alto
I think you have been looking at older scores where a timpani roll is notated as a trill but it is simply a tremolo and should not be two different pitches.

I don't understand your 'piano start' – simply 4 repeated notes? I don't hear any of your chord structures in that and your orchestrated version doesn't contain tonic/dominant. In a piano start I would be able to see all the relevant notes.
 
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gh0stwrit3r

gh0stwrit3r

Active Member
I would suggest you use the horns rather than trombones as the bridge to the trumpet and revoice the viola to C#4 A4 maybe and have woodwinds to match strings.
Trombone uses tenor clef - not alto
I think you have been looking at older scores where a timpani roll is notated as a trill but it is simply a tremolo and should not be two different pitches.

I don't understand your 'piano start' – simply 4 repeated notes? I don't hear any of your chord structures in that and your orchestrated version doesn't contain tonic/dominant. In a piano start I would be able to see all the relevant notes.
Thanks! This is the feedback I was looking for. All the sketches I do are part of my personal learning program and I love to share them. So I have a long road ahead of me :)

You're indeed right about looking at older scores. I study ones from Mahler and Dvorak momentarily.

About the piano start ... I started with a single note, extended that to a massive A chord and then started with the orchestration. Maybe that's a strange way of working (I don't know), but at least it makes sense in my head ;)

Thanks again for the feedback! Much appreciated!
 
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gh0stwrit3r

gh0stwrit3r

Active Member
Triplets. I love them! Back in the days when I played in several bands as a drummer I sometimes just switched for fun to triplets. Making my band go mad. Cause you can get really disorientated by these kind of rhythms. I also remember the good old times when I walked on the street. My foot steps were the quarter notes. Then I started clapping. First same quarter notes. Then eights. Speeding up to sixteenths. Switching to triplets. Then only the accents on the triplets: 1, 3, 2, 1, 3, 2, etc.. I loved doing that!

  1. 00:00 - Introduction (new intro sound)
  2. 01:33 - First listening (start on the piano and orchestrated version)
  3. 02:44 - The melody (the simple piano line I started with)
  4. 04:09 - Triplets (playing three notes in the time of two)
  5. 06:32 - The harmony (building up chords for support)
  6. 07:46 - Orchestration (the symphonic version I ended up with)

 
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gh0stwrit3r

gh0stwrit3r

Active Member
This week I went tutti again. Meaning the full orchestra participates in this orchestral sketch. The flutes, piccolo, oboes, clarinets, bassoons, horns, trumpets, trombones, tuba, timpani, bass drum, triangle, violins, violas, cellos and double basses. So prepare yourself for a lot of power!

  1. 00:00 - Introduction to this orchestral sketch
  2. 00:58 - First listening (start on the piano and orchestrated version)
  3. 01:57 - The start (the simple piano line I started with)
  4. 03:47 - The harmony (building up chords for support)
  5. 04:51 - The extras (for some excitement in brass and percussion)
  6. 06:15 - Orchestration (the symphonic version I ended up with)
 
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gh0stwrit3r

gh0stwrit3r

Active Member
In this week’s orchestral sketch I start a little bit different. No cantus firmus. No melody. Just a simple basic chord progression. Just three chords. That’s all! And you can be amazed by what you can do with that if you start to experiment and develop it further and further.

  1. 00:00 - Introduction to this orchestral sketch
  2. 01:12 - First Listening (piano chords and orchestrated version)
  3. 02:06 - Chords (the basic piano chords I started with)
  4. 03:38 - Melody (simple motifs, yet effective ones)
  5. 05:29 - Movement (patterns like ostinatos or figures for harp)
  6. 07:39 - Orchestration (the symphonic version I ended up with)
 
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gh0stwrit3r

gh0stwrit3r

Active Member
In this orchestral sketch I want to show you an approach that is ridiculous. But yet can be very effective to get you on your way! I think this one is really awesome! So keep with me during the steps, cause I take you to a part of my brain that drives the nerd in me :)

And for all who can’t or have difficulty with reading music notes, I’m going to show it to you in MIDI too!

  1. 00:00 - Introduction (boost creativity and inspiration)
  2. 01:26 - First Listening (piano line and Orchestrated version)
  3. 02:13 - The approach (use the name David for composing rules)
  4. 03:43 - Cantus Firmus (the piano line I started with)
  5. 04:24 - Harmony (a simple chord progression can do the job nicely)
  6. 05:43 - Melody (only 20 notes left to write a descent melody)
  7. 09:08 - Orchestration (the symphonic version I ended up with)
 
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gh0stwrit3r

gh0stwrit3r

Active Member
In this orchestral sketch I use a concept for a basic layer which sounds amazing! And it is super simple! Even if you have zero experience with a piano, you can learn to play it live within minutes. And you would steal the show.

  1. 00:00 - Introduction (massive thanks to my Patrons!)
  2. 01:35 - First Listening (piano line and orchestrated version)
  3. 03:00 - Cantus Firmus (only four notes to start with)
  4. 03:57 - The Trick (become a piano maestro and steal the show!)
  5. 07:39 - Melody 1 (I wrote this melody with a cello in mind)
  6. 09:17 - Melody 2 (another beautiful orchestral colour)
  7. 10:43 - Harmony (write down the chord progression for strings)
  8. 11:59 - Orchestration (the symphonic version I ended up with)