Stand alone Glock library

Discussion in 'SAMPLE Talk' started by shnootre, Apr 3, 2019.

  1. bigcat1969

    bigcat1969 Senior Member

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  2. jonnybutter

    jonnybutter Active Member

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    I wouldn't recommend the 'Modernist Glock'. At least check it out very thoroughly before you buy - which I didn't do, alas.
     
  3. Lilainjil

    Lilainjil New Member

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    For glockenspiel I alternate between Spitfire's Ricotti Mallets or True Strike's if I want a deeper more reverberant sound. And sometimes I'll just play the cheap one here in the blue plastic case.
     
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  4. Wally Garten

    Wally Garten Active Member

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    There's that, too. Depending on the part, glock can be pretty easy to play, and you can buy one for not much more than a Kontakt library....
     
  5. ptram

    ptram Senior Member

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    The glockenspiel included in Kontakt's factory library is not bad at all. It should be a reduced VSL instrument. Considering that there are not many articulations in the original instrument, this should be enough.

    However, I think you need the full Kontakt to use it, and not the Player alone.

    Paolo
     
  6. OP
    OP
    shnootre

    shnootre Active Member

    Thanks all. (I'm the OP). The off-topic discussion was interesting to me, though people can get a bit too worked up over terminology I think! In any case, I ended up recommending the Sonokinetic bundle for 50 Euros. This is for a live opera performance with orchestra, so subbing any other instrument would not be an option - and for whatever reason the real glock is not an option (it could just be that they want the contracted keyboard player to do it because the percussionists have their hands full, I don't know). I suggested the need for Kontakt Player because I am assuming they'll want the set up to be as simple as possible. I use and love VSL instruments all the time, but I'm not gonna suggest that to someone who may have very limited experience using sample libraries and players. Hopefully it gets the job done. For my own use, I like the Glock in Berlin Percussion just fine.
     
  7. willbedford

    willbedford Composer/Programmer

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  8. Nick Batzdorf

    Nick Batzdorf Moderator

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    Depending on the part!

    I've encountered easy piano parts on glock many times. They're not easy glock parts.
     
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  9. Wally Garten

    Wally Garten Active Member

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    I'm probably just having severe beginner's overconfidence, having recently taught myself to play Hedwig's Theme and the Pink Panther Theme. :rolleyes:
     
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  10. Mark Schmieder

    Mark Schmieder Active Member

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    Yeah, I thought it was a request for a recommendation of a foley library for gunshots! I NEVER hear anyone refer to a Glockenspiel as a Glock!

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glock

    As for the INSTRUMENT vs. the GUN, how standalone does it have to be? If you don't mind it being a very focused library of chromatic percussion, there are several excellent choices; especially Frank Ricotti's Mallets library for Spitfire. And then Sonokinetic Mallets, followed by Soniccouture's Imogen Heap Box of Tricks.

    Precisionsound has a JenCo Marching Glockenspiel library, which I think is probably NOT what you're looking for. :)

    Be careful with the suggestion to look for Orchestral Bells as well; the terminology is all over the map and that often means Tubular Bells or a collection of Hand Bells pitched across a chromatic octave scale.
     
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  11. Nick Batzdorf

    Nick Batzdorf Moderator

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    Glock and orchestra bells are both the same instrument - glockenspiel.

    Tubular bells and chimes are the same instrument. I've never heard hand bells called anything else.
     
  12. Nick Batzdorf

    Nick Batzdorf Moderator

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    Okay, I looked at what I have here.

    Audiobro LADD has a good glock. It's probably the easiest one to play without getting into the ear-splitting velocity range.
    EastWest QLSO - the original one - also has a good glock, and the same one is in Goliath.
    Vir2 Elite Orchestral Percussion has several varieties. It's recorded drier than the others, but I can't fault it.

    Another thing: like celesta, crotales are a more interesting substitute. I don't know why, but glock always feels dated to me; I'd do my best to use something different.
     
  13. 667

    667 Senior Member

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    For me the real answer is Spitfire Percussion which has Glock and Celeste.

    Alternatively, SonicCouture's Morpheus or Resonance Emotional Mallets from Impact Sound Works.
     
  14. Casiquire

    Casiquire Senior Member

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    One more vote for Sonokinetic!

    I agree the Celesta is more beautiful but it's so soft, if you're going for anything realistic the glock serves an entirely different purpose and has a tone that cuts through better, even with softer mallets
     
  15. Nick Batzdorf

    Nick Batzdorf Moderator

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    Glock does cut through, no question, but whether the celesta also does depends on the library. The VSL celesta does, while the old EWQLSO one is a lot softer. (I think those are the only two I have.)

    They're different sounds. Glocks have a higher sustain part of their envelope, but the celesta can do a lot more (because it's a keyboard) and has a much wider note range. "Entirely different purpose" depends on the context.

    Given a choice, obviously you'd want both.
     
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  16. Mark Schmieder

    Mark Schmieder Active Member

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    Nick, I have several libraries that are mislabeled. I was not defining what's real (which you did a great job of), but what is "out there". It's unfortunate, and I owe some of it up to "translation problems" when vendors might not be aware of different traditions in each language. I was shocked as I annotated my full collection of libraries.

    Believe it or not, celesta and related instruments also get mislabeled by some vendors.

    Of course, the most notorious mislabeling is widespread -- in the USA at least -- and causes most people to think a xylophone is a metal vs. wood instrument. It's enough to make one reach for one's Glock. :)
     
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  17. Mark Schmieder

    Mark Schmieder Active Member

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    I only started working with Crotales a couple of years ago. One of the things I've discovered is that they are a great layering instrument, with any of the other chromatic percussion. They can even liven up and modernize a Glockenspiel part!
     
  18. TimCox

    TimCox Active Member

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    I tend to use glockenspiel as an accent instrument for brightening certain notes or passages. It's rough as a soloist for some reason!
     
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  19. Nick Batzdorf

    Nick Batzdorf Moderator

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    Yeah, I used to get that a lot back in the day when I played mallets - it's all xylophones.
     

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