Spoken dialogue

TimCox

Active Member
Hey all, I'm finishing up work on a little two song musical a friend is directing and I have a question for anyone experienced with scoring this type of stuff.

Obviously the music will be produced before filming and there is a section in one song where the melody starts and quickly turns into quasi rhythmic talking. How would you notate this? My instinct is to use x noteheads that cover the basic span leaving it up to the performer to give it their own inflection and rhythm BUT I want to do this right. Does anyone have insight on the correct procedure for this?

Thanks!
 

Living Fossil

Senior Member
The x noteheads are ok.
If it comes to the pitches and rhythm: i would notate exactly what i have in mind, but also write in the passage that the singer can do the bars in question with some freedom (you could also write "con licenza" or "improvisando" etc.).

This has a big advantage: If you like what the singer does (on his own), you let him do it. If not, you can always remind him to stick more to the notation, without getting into discussions.
It really depends on the musician, how many freedom they like. Some feel lost without strict instructions since they are unable to improvise, others get the best results when they are free. But as a composer you should always keep the control, just for the case it's needed.
 
OP
TimCox

TimCox

Active Member
The x noteheads are ok.
If it comes to the pitches and rhythm: i would notate exactly what i have in mind, but also write in the passage that the singer can do the bars in question with some freedom (you could also write "con licenza" or "improvisando" etc.).

This has a big advantage: If you like what the singer does (on his own), you let him do it. If not, you can always remind him to stick more to the notation, without getting into discussions.
It really depends on the musician, how many freedom they like. Some feel lost without strict instructions since they are unable to improvise, others get the best results when they are free. But as a composer you should always keep the control, just for the case it's needed.
Thank you! That makes a ton of sense, much appreciated