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Spitfire Symphonic Strings

Discussion in 'SAMPLE Talk' started by jononotbono, Oct 12, 2017 at 3:52 AM.

  1. jononotbono

    jononotbono Luke Johnson

    So, I just bought Spitfire Symphonic Strings and loving it so far. About to put it in my template and wondering if anyone has any advice on using it? I have just come across Legato Types and the Legacy Folder. The Runs Patch sounds so good. I own Chamber Strings and that is a beast but I'm starting to get the impression this is the full on Bad Boy Strings Library to get to grips with. I figured I may have to change the velocities for different Legato arts as my keyboard controller isn't the most sensitive of controllers and hitting velocity above 70 is hard work.

    I was also wondering how many arts from SSS people have in their templates. With SCS, I have every single Art loaded and I did this just to learn the library (of which I am still doing) and have access to absolutely everything. I'm thinking about trying out Expression Maps in Cubase with this library just to see if I like that work flow.

    I have to say, this is a beast of a String library and highly inspiring to play. Looking forward to picking up the Symphonic String Evolutions as well when I can afford it!

    Jono
     
    AlexanderSchiborr likes this.
  2. benuzzell

    benuzzell Active Member

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    I tend to use mainly the ensemble and performance legato patches from SSS. All your main arts (trills, longs, con sord, trem, pizz etc), a performance legato for each section, and then maybe a further 8-12 of project specific ones; at the moment I'm doing some action cues, so there's cello and basses stacs on top of the ensemble stacs for more bite etc. I try and find a spot in everything I do for those flautando patches as well, they're just amazing.
     
  3. markleake

    markleake Recovering sale addict

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    I've had SSS since it came out, and am still very much learning it (especially given I don't get much time for VIs - creating music is a hobby for me). But as @benuzzell says, the thing to do is get the performance patches in for each section. Then the longs, trills, trems, and main shorts in for all the sections, and also the same for the ensembles if you want to use them. Given the performance patches do a lot of the heavy lifting anyway, these would then cover most of your uses.

    For softer stuff the flautando are a bit of a must, as they work wonders in those sections, and the brushed shorts are nice also for a similar reason. I also really love the sound of the Sul G/C legatos, but haven't had a chance to use that patch in much yet. And opening Kontakt to look in the patch list again just now, I can see I've got a long way to go to explore this library! :)

    I don't have problems with the velocities, because as with all shorts, I just go in and highlight in Cubase and drag velocities up/down as needed after playing something in.
     
  4. tomasgarciad

    tomasgarciad Member

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    I had a question for you SCS/SSS owners. I’m looking to take advantage of the Back to School program and buy either one of those libraries, given that I currently only own Cinesymphony LITE and would like to expand my string libraries/libraries in general.

    Currently I can only get one; which one would be the best to start with? Initially I considered SSS but since I’m looking at getting into scoring student short films I thought a smaller ensemble such as SCS would be more appropriate. Is this a correct thought?
     
  5. Harry

    Harry Senior Member

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    I think you should start your own thread on this rather than hijack someone elses ...
     
  6. Paul Christof

    Paul Christof Film & Game Composer

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    SCS is definetly better suited for your needs. But man, the performance legatos in SSS sound amazing and are super flexible (you have bowed,fingered,portamento and run techniques with 16 players per section). I suggest you get SCS because they too sound amazing and you can get some AMAZING results with the flautando patches (personal favorite out off all my libraries) and the legatos are great too.
     
    tomasgarciad likes this.
  7. sostenuto

    sostenuto Senior Member

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    Thank-you. Similar interests @ tomasgarciad and trust @ jononotbono has no OT concerns. ;)
    Not so much a matter of SSS or SCS, but which one first ?? Appreciate your perspectives.
     
    tomasgarciad likes this.
  8. OP
    OP
    jononotbono

    jononotbono Luke Johnson

    Ahh, I don't have a problem with discussing SCS in this thread. SSS and SCS are two members of the same family. The reason I bought SCS first is because if you listen to what is current in media, full symphonic String sections aren't really as necessary and they just sound so massive. Chamber Strings is much smaller and despite being able to make it sound massive, it is a different sound. Perhaps more detailed but I've only had SSS for a few days so wouldn't like to say that. And I agree, the Flautando patches just sound amazing. As it is the "Back to School" season with Spitfire and combined with the fact I am trying to venture into the Video Game Music and Audio World as well as TV and Film, I figured it would be rude not to indulge in SSS and finally start trying to learn how to wield it.

    Yeah regarding Velocities, the performance Legatos rely on Velocity and speed of playing in order for the different Leg types to be setected so having a keyboard with bad velocity response is a bit annoying in this respect. It's no problem to change them but on the other hand, there a lot of patches. :)
     
    tomasgarciad likes this.
  9. nas

    nas Senior Member

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    I love SSS. I have the Core arts, Legato patches, Decorative patches and TM patches for each instrument loaded into one instance of Kontakt and then use an articulation switcher - that keeps everything in one track lane and helps reduce an unnecessarily large template. Surprisingly I find my self using lots of those articulations and having them all "under one roof" is very convenient. Its a great library. Enjoy it!
     
    fixxer49 and jononotbono like this.
  10. OP
    OP
    jononotbono

    jononotbono Luke Johnson

    I'm very intrigued about Articulation switching. I would use an iPad to visually have the Articulations but I am dubious because I'm trying to understand how to balance the levels of Articulations between one another and how do you layer different Arts on top of each other? Love the idea of less tracks! I'm at 2540 now!
     
  11. tomasgarciad

    tomasgarciad Member

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    Thank you @Paul Christof and @jononotbono, I think I'm going to take the bait and go with SCS for now, and get SSS sometime in the near future. Can't go wrong with either really! :2thumbs:

    I apologize for going off topic, please continue!

    Cheers
     
  12. sostenuto

    sostenuto Senior Member

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    Glad you found your solution ! Never OT from this perspective. :thumbsup:
     
    tomasgarciad likes this.
  13. Spitfire instruments have got both of those things built in. You can activate "per articulation mixer" from a button on top of the mic position faders - that way each articulation can have it's own mic blend and levels, which you can also automate. As for layering, both regular KS and UACC KS allow you to trigger multiple articulations at once if you overlap the keyswitches.
     
    jononotbono likes this.
  14. OP
    OP
    jononotbono

    jononotbono Luke Johnson

    Yeah, I love the Mic Position Mixes and being able to copy to different Arts for consistency but how do you raise or lower the volume of a specific Articulation, for example, if the String Col Legnos are louder than the String Spiccatos? On Separate tracks that's easy but I'm wondering about how to do this if all arts are coming out of the same Kontakt output? VEPro sub-mixing? Also, how do you give stems of Col Leg, Harmonics, Shorts and Longs (which are typically asked for - and sometimes not - so flexibility is important) when everything is coming out of the same audio output?

    Also, I'm also wondering how you would send different Reverbs to, for example, the Short Note Tails and the Legato Tails because of the way they are performed, the tails sound different (with all libraries I know of)?

    The UACC KS seems interesting to get around triggering Multiple Articulations! Think I'm going to need to re-read a few manuals.
     
  15. OP
    OP
    jononotbono

    jononotbono Luke Johnson

    Just wondering how much RAM SSS would use if I did load every single Art onto separate tracks (using only Decca Mic)?
     
  16. JeffvR

    JeffvR Senior Member

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    I'd make separate tracks for longs and shorts. So all legato, con sordino, tremolo etc on one track and all staccato, spiccato, pizzicato etc on one track. If the volume for legato and tremolo doesn't match just adjust it within kontakt.
     
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  17. aaronventure

    aaronventure Active Member

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    5 tracks total, like @nas said. Some time ago, I had a template with 800+ tracks, every articulation in its own track. By the time I finished a couple of pieces, I was going crazy. I was spending more time scrolling around than actually doing work, plus Reaper wasn't running smooth scrolling through that many tracks. Project size was around 300 MB. I can't imagine being at 2450+.

    I use Expression maps. I'm currently using ~120 tracks in my template (and more that are receiving audio, but they are only visible in the mixer, and some hidden ones used for MIDI routing and stacking articulations where I make my own performance patches, total is 210), and Woodwinds, Brass and Strings fit into one screen. I only scroll for mallets and percussion. This is the cleanest I am able to make it right now, project size is ~60 MB and am pretty happy with it.

    I guess the only thing left to do is get a bigger screen.
     
    jononotbono likes this.
  18. OP
    OP
    jononotbono

    jononotbono Luke Johnson

    Ahh, well, this becomes a non-issue when you use an iPad for Template navigation. At the press of one button I can just show whatever tracks I want and hide the rest. And then there's the Midi editing Capabilities. I've created all sorts of buttons that allow me to copy specific Midi data from the project window (not inside the Key editor) that makes copying and pasting things, deleting, editing specific CCs by the touch of a few buttons very easy.

    I also bought a 43 inch 4k screen which immediately gets over most scrolling problems. I'm going to look into Art switching with SSS so I can compare both workflows with SCS (as I have that on separate tracks). Thanks for sharing how you work. Really interesting man!
     
    aaronventure likes this.
  19. babylonwaves

    babylonwaves Senior Member

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    totally depends on your DFD settings. in general it is pretty low in comparison to other libs of a similar size
     
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  20. aaronventure

    aaronventure Active Member

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    Ah, that makes much more sense. If Cubase is better at handling hundreds of tracks than Reaper, that sounds fantastic. Reaper still has ways to go with options like these, but I'm happy that I've found a workflow that works for me. The plus side of having it all in one track is that it's very easy to see exactly what you have going on for each section/instrument, and that it's very easy to export the notation.

    I too am looking into getting a 4k screen, I'm just worried about input lag if I buy a standard 4k TV which isn't a dedicated monitor.
     

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