Spitfire Spring Wish List Announced ;)

Manaberry

Active Member
<Frantically checks wishlist>
It's the core Studio Series for me I think. The last SF product I brought was Albion ONE and I've used it everywhere. I quite fancy the smaller sections and can think of a few good uses for them already.

Of course, there is an added financial complication with the impending arrival of my third child. Why do this to me, Spitfire?
Hehe. See your third child as a long term investment. Someday maybe he/she will find a job at Spitfire Audio and gives you nice discounts :emoji_grimacing:
 

DerGeist

Active Member
I kind of wish the was more consensus on studio woodwinds. I could use some better/different winds but kind of get the feeling I might be better off elsewhere.
 

Parsifal666

I don't even own a DAW, I'm just a troll.
I think SStW was recorded in the same room as BHCT, so that bodes well in terms of matching. If I understand what OT did, Berlin winds are going to sound similar to the Arks in terms of built-in room sound. SSW also has the big hall sound similar to the Albions.

I like your description of SStW as "glassy," which I think gives a different way to think about their more restrained expressivity. ("Cool" might be another apt descriptor.)
That makes even more sense.

I agree, glassy as a description also helps separate SStW from (what sounds to me generally) darker Berlin and bald Hein.

Uh, I think you know what I mean lol!
 

Parsifal666

I don't even own a DAW, I'm just a troll.
I'm sure @Parsifal666 mentioned having it, would you recommend this for my darker days?
It's meant for that, my friend. I've had people tell me they prefer it to CAGE, though I've never owned that one. Uist can be something it's not advertised as, too: if you want to get creative you can make seriously killer rhythms out of those low brass, strings, and woodwinds. Chop, chop, chop!
 

Parsifal666

I don't even own a DAW, I'm just a troll.
I kind of wish the was more consensus on studio woodwinds. I could use some better/different winds but kind of get the feeling I might be better off elsewhere.
There will always be unrest, and a couple of people have made good arguments.

What I've heard has been more than good enough to sell me on them, that's all I know. I let my ear make the final decision, and I recommend that approach highly.
 

ism

Senior Member
Great question! On the whole I've learned that I could conceivably just stay with the Chris Hein woodwinds...I've managed to make some fairly convincing ensembles with that library (though, granted, I usually have to place them back in the mix), and the dry sound makes them more malleable.

The difference here is the mics: SStW has what Chris' libraries don't (as fine as the latter are), and that's the ability to add dimension, direction...plus, subtract some of the engineering sweat. This is also true for the EWH series, BHCT (which is a very excellent dry library far beyond its original, quasi-niche intention), and some others I'm probably unfairly forgetting.

As much I as both adore and have gained from wet libraries like the Albions and Met Arks, I notice that they were kind of like long-term flings for me. I can only do so much with that baked in sound, even with the mics. I found myself inevitably hauling out the Hollywood Strings and Hein Woodwinds, time and again, especially when it came to the final mix.

Not that those wet libraries aren't great (and when I'm talking about great Albions I mean mostly Iceni and Uist, though the first two Albions and Legacy have their charms), I just feel a bit straightjacketed and worried about sounding too much like the Joneses when composing with them. Even such a meisterwerk of a library as Emotional Cello has its disadvantages in this way.

SStW has a sound that has really sparked my interest. I'll probably buy both Berlin WWs and SStW this year, mostly because together they form an inspiring spectrum: the wet and dark and the dry and glassy-bright.

I'm still undecided whether to add SSW to my Wish List...from your message I get the feeling SSW is yet another wet SA library (though again I quite like its not entirely dissimilar, brightish sound). And I feel I have too many of those.

I could be wrong on any points, and I'd be grateful for any correction.

Thanks - that helps put some words to my sense of why I might like this as an addition to SSW (and what at some point I might like to think about picking up some CH).

And I like the work 'glassy' too. I've been thinking about it as a kind of 'harshness', but that's not quite it. Maybe a 'crunchiness', 'crispness' or 'definition' would be better words. Or course I find with SStS it can be softened by sploshing on lots and lots of reverb. But while I bought SStS as a kind of 'SCS light' (and am very happy with it in this regard) a nice surprise is that I've discover an effect of the dryness that can be quite beautiful in its own right, if used carefully.

Maybe a kind of 'fragility' that would otherwise be softened by the wetness of the SSW hall is another way to put it. Probably this shouldn't have been a surprise, as this kind of fragile beauty (arising from the dryness among other things) is one of the things I love most about LCO.


So yes, I can see how it would make sense to use SStWW to add that sonority to a wind palette.


And certainly SSW is 'another web Spitfire library' (and this phrase captures rather well why I love it so much). But I do find that compared to, for instance, the strings patches in the Albions (I have only I & V) I use the close mics on SSW very differently. I would seldom bother using close mics on Albion string patches, as I just don't feel they need it. Wheres the mix of close and ~ 50% tree mics are what makes the sound os SSW for me (similarly for the solo strings).

So I'd speculate that it might be worth checking out the SSW close mics in their own right, and not just extrapolating from the way it works in the Albion.

That said, what the tree brings to the close mics is that sense is not just the reverb, but sense of space and presence (which no reverb I can can come even close to simulating). Actually, 'dimension' is quite a good way to describe whatever it is I like about it, as it not quite the same thing as wetness. So whether you can get the dimension you're looking for with SSW without loosing the glassiness is not at all clear.

Where I do think SSW has a big advantage over StSS (and BWW minus the expansions) in for lyrical lines. Although perhaps you're also not looking at SStW for lyrical solo lines - which I guess makes sense of you have the CH libs.

And the big difference from SSW and BWW is that in the Berlin approach, BWW is by design relatively flat, and adds foreground lyrical instruments only in exp B & C. Whereas Spitfire balances workaday orchestral winds with surprisingly good capacity to go front and centre in a lyrical passage occasionally (although I still want BWW exp B, and maybe a few more Claire winds to augment SSW at times). The original BWW thread has useful demos clarifying this effect, including re-peat's (negative, but very helpful) examples where the BWW sounds terrible when forced into lyrically territory against its will. Conversely some people have complained that for workaday wind lines, SSW is too lyrical. Though that's a level of orchestral fitness that's just way over my head.

(And when you account for the price difference, this is also part of why, as great as BWW sounds, SSW is vastly better value for myself).

Curious to hear how SStW will mix with CH.
 
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DerGeist

Active Member
I went from modest wants to wanting everything. The Maverick bundle looks like a winner. I always kind of wanted the Bernard Herman samples and LCO sounds great. I'm not 100% sure about alternative solo strings. I wonder if there is just too much overlap with the regular solo strings package which I already own.
 

ism

Senior Member
I'm not 100% sure about alternative solo strings. I wonder if there is just too much overlap with the regular solo strings package which I already own.
That's a really interesting question. (Both theoretically and practically).
 

Henu

Senior Member
Owning the Alternative Solo Strings, they are completely different than any other solo strings I've encountered.
It sounds....different, kindly put. Harsh, rude, and overly artistic. Stuff you hear in beatnik documentaries and in French black and white art films which almost got to Cannes but were canned (get it? canned! jeesh, I kill myself) due to obvious patriarcal hierarchy who don't understand the value of true filmic art.

If I'm ever gonna score a documentary on beatniks or people who make installations out of old bread I'm so going to use them. But as I'm a contemporary wimp, I stick with regular-sounding solo strings until that.
 

miket

Senior Member
I only own Alternative Solo Strings, but I don't think there's much overlap with the other Spitfire solo strings. The recordings are very different, as is the style of playing. And, you only get two legatos in ASS, which are somewhat utilitarian and aren't as suited to regular lyrical solo string writing as the other library is.
 

DerGeist

Active Member
Owning the Alternative Solo Strings, they are completely different than any other solo strings I've encountered.
It sounds....different, kindly put. Harsh, rude, and overly artistic. Stuff you hear in beatnik documentaries and in French black and white art films which almost got to Cannes but were canned (get it? canned! jeesh, I kill myself) due to obvious patriarcal hierarchy who don't understand the value of true filmic art.

If I'm ever gonna score a documentary on beatniks or people who make installations out of old bread I'm so going to use them. But as I'm a contemporary wimp, I stick with regular-sounding solo strings until that.
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ism

Senior Member
Yes I agree there are some very clear aspects of these libraries where they obviously do not overlap.

But there is a really nice textural element to SsS that, well, at least intersecst - and perhaps overlaps? - with SASS.

Perhaps kind of a pedantic distinction. But I find it interesting.
 
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James H

01001000 01101001
But there is a really nice textural element to SsS that, well, at least intersect - and perhaps overlap? - with SASS.
Totally agree. I just had a play with all 3 and love how they interweave with each other. I feel SsS can be used to calm/tame the other 2 down before things get too... interesting should we say :D
 
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ism

Senior Member
Totally agree. I just had a play with all 3 and love how they interweave with each other. I feel SsS can be used to calm/tame the other 2 down before things get too... interesting should we say :D
Yep. I have plans to really spend some time working out how to do this at some point.

There is the issue of getting them to blend convincingly, but hopefully that isn’t insurmountable.
 

5Lives

Senior Member
What are some alternatives that people like to Hans Zimmer Percussion? I have some CinePerc today along with Action Strikes.
 

TomislavEP

Active Member
I've just learned about this newest wishfest from this topic (on the second thought, maybe it would be better if I hadn't) ;)

For the time being, I have almost all Spitfire libraries I could afford myself and which I really wanted to have at my disposal. But I'm rather seriously thinking about investing in British Drama Toolkit. I'm hoping to delve much more in composing using only orchestral sounds in the future and while I absolute love my primary orchestral toolkit (Albion I, II, V, Harp, Grand Piano, Aluphone), BDT allures me with its concept alone: expression through velocity, which may not only prove itself as a great sketching and inspirational tool but possibly even a gamechanger of sorts in my personal workflow. At 40% off it is a very tempting proposition, even for my limited budget. However, I'm a bit on the edge as I was hoping that Native Instruments would launch a sale for Komplete upgrades by now or in a very near future. Ever since I've purchased my first version of Komplete, I'm traditionally upgrading when the upgrades are 50% off as the new versions always bring at least a couple of interesting new things, plus the bang for the buck factor.