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SPITFIRE - Spitfire Solo Strings NEW Virtuoso Violin Total Performance Patch

SpitfireSupport

Customer Experience
May I ask what Andy Blaney's Keyboard controller of choice is? Obviously these performance patches rely on different velocities when playing and his must be at least semi decent to be able to perform this stuff. I'm on the hunt for a new controller as mine is horrendous and just thought I'd ask. Thanks.
Hey Luke, Andy uses a Fatar/Studio Logic Numa, but mentions that any weighted keyboard would suffice.
 

miket

Senior Member
Wow, this is a hell of a reminder why I've decided to put most of my eggs in the Spitfire basket.
 

ism

Senior Member
Not at all! We've updated the user manual here with some more information in regards to this patch. Page 12 is what you're looking for.

Luke
Thanks - the new manual is very helpful.

There so much going on here though - some really brilliant scripting I have to say, especially on the vibrato. I wonder if you could clarify a few things:


1. "five different types of true legato: Portamento Legato, Fingered Legato, Bowed Legato, Runs and Arpeggios"

Q: what's the difference between runs and arpeggios? Are arpeggios different from the fast legatos (as seems to be implied)? Are these 5 legatos conceived differently from Sacconi?


2. "Molto Vibrato - Within the range 65-127, an intense vibrato is triggered which is exaggerated above 75."

Q: I'm trying to figure out what exactly is going on here (and what might be the impact of turning off time machine, since it's immensely expensive). Are there two different recordings of molto (c21 ~ 65-74) and extra-molto vibrato (75-127), or is time machine at work, or is it a script (in the style of, for instance, embertone)? Or is the idea that you can crossfade during a performance?


UPDATE: oh, here's the answer right in the manual: "1b: Utilise TM increases the vibrato rate above 75. Turn this off if your CPU is struggling. "

I was wondering how that was done, it sounded too good to be scripted.


3. "Progressive Vibrato - Within the range 33-64, the player begins the note without vibrato and progresses into vibrato. Depending on the note velocity, the player’s progression to vibrato will be slow or fast. Lower velocities, 1-9, trigger a slow progression to vibrato, and high velocities, 10-127 trigger quick progressions. "


Q: Now this is an immensely cool feature. Similar question though - is this where the time machine is being used? Or are there separate recordings of faster and slower progressive vibrato?



4. "Staccato and Spiccato

With CC21 set to 6-127 spiccatos feature as a short attack, whilst staccatos can be found at CC21, 1-5. The Velocity of these short notes then determines the nature of the note attack.

Attacks: Vel 1-9 natural attack
(CC21: 1-5) Vel 10-127 Staccato 4x RR pp, mf, & ‘noise’
(CC21: 6-127) Vel 10-127 Spiccato 8x RR pp, mf, & ‘noise’.


Q: Is there any way to alter the 1-9 velocity range of a natural attack. I think my keyboard just isn't sensitive enough to make hitting this range reliably, so this is a very major niggle.

In fact I'd go so far as to say that the added playability of the staccato comes at

Similarly for the progressive legato which is sensitive to a 1-9 velocity.

Alternately, it would be nice to just turn off the staccato feature entirely in some circumstances. Especially if this is where time machine is hitting the CPU.


Thanks!
 
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Pablocrespo

Active Member
Yes, some sugestions
Thanks - the new manual is very helpful.

There so much going on here though - some really brilliant scripting I have to say, especially on the vibrato. I wonder if you could clarify a few things:


1. "five different types of true legato: Portamento Legato, Fingered Legato, Bowed Legato, Runs and Arpeggios"

Q: what's the difference between runs and arpeggios? Are arpeggios different from the fast legatos (as seems to be implied)? Are these 5 legatos conceived differently from Sacconi?


2. "Molto Vibrato - Within the range 65-127, an intense vibrato is triggered which is exaggerated above 75."

Q: I'm trying to figure out what exactly is going on here (and what might be the impact of turning off time machine, since it's immensely expensive). Are there two different recordings of molto (c21 ~ 65-74) and extra-molto vibrato (75-127), or is time machine at work, or is it a script (in the style of, for instance, embertone)? Or is the idea that you can crossfade during a performance?


UPDATE: oh, here's the answer right in the manual: "1b: Utilise TM increases the vibrato rate above 75. Turn this off if your CPU is struggling. "

I was wondering how that was done, it sounded too good to be scripted.


3. "Progressive Vibrato - Within the range 33-64, the player begins the note without vibrato and progresses into vibrato. Depending on the note velocity, the player’s progression to vibrato will be slow or fast. Lower velocities, 1-9, trigger a slow progression to vibrato, and high velocities, 10-127 trigger quick progressions. "


Q: Now this is an immensely cool feature. Similar question though - is this where the time machine is being used? Or are there separate recordings of faster and slower progressive vibrato?



4. "Staccato and Spiccato

With CC21 set to 6-127 spiccatos feature as a short attack, whilst staccatos can be found at CC21, 1-5. The Velocity of these short notes then determines the nature of the note attack.

Attacks: Vel 1-9 natural attack
(CC21: 1-5) Vel 10-127 Staccato 4x RR pp, mf, & ‘noise’
(CC21: 6-127) Vel 10-127 Spiccato 8x RR pp, mf, & ‘noise’.


Q: Is there any way to alter the 1-9 velocity range of a natural attack. I think my keyboard just isn't sensitive enough to make hitting this range reliably, so this is a very major niggle.

In fact I'd go so far as to say that the added playability of the staccato comes at

Similarly for the progressive legato which is sensitive to a 1-9 velocity.

Alternately, it would be nice to just turn off the staccato feature entirely in some circumstances. Especially if this is where time machine is hitting the CPU.


Thanks!
Yes, I wish they could make a patch that has the lower velocity limit a little higher, I cannot seem to trigger an attack without the staccato and the slow progressive vibrato with my keyboard

5 and 9 velocity limits are too low for my keyboard. I was told I cannot change this parameters, so maybe spitfire could make a crappy controller patch to download with those variables adjusted?

That said, this is gorgeous, so, when are we getting that performance cello?
 

Karma

Spitfire Audio
Thanks - the new manual is very helpful.

There so much going on here though - some really brilliant scripting I have to say, especially on the vibrato. I wonder if you could clarify a few things:


1. "five different types of true legato: Portamento Legato, Fingered Legato, Bowed Legato, Runs and Arpeggios"

Q: what's the difference between runs and arpeggios? Are arpeggios different from the fast legatos (as seems to be implied)? Are these 5 legatos conceived differently from Sacconi?


2. "Molto Vibrato - Within the range 65-127, an intense vibrato is triggered which is exaggerated above 75."

Q: I'm trying to figure out what exactly is going on here (and what might be the impact of turning off time machine, since it's immensely expensive). Are there two different recordings of molto (c21 ~ 65-74) and extra-molto vibrato (75-127), or is time machine at work, or is it a script (in the style of, for instance, embertone)? Or is the idea that you can crossfade during a performance?


UPDATE: oh, here's the answer right in the manual: "1b: Utilise TM increases the vibrato rate above 75. Turn this off if your CPU is struggling. "

I was wondering how that was done, it sounded too good to be scripted.


3. "Progressive Vibrato - Within the range 33-64, the player begins the note without vibrato and progresses into vibrato. Depending on the note velocity, the player’s progression to vibrato will be slow or fast. Lower velocities, 1-9, trigger a slow progression to vibrato, and high velocities, 10-127 trigger quick progressions. "


Q: Now this is an immensely cool feature. Similar question though - is this where the time machine is being used? Or are there separate recordings of faster and slower progressive vibrato?



4. "Staccato and Spiccato

With CC21 set to 6-127 spiccatos feature as a short attack, whilst staccatos can be found at CC21, 1-5. The Velocity of these short notes then determines the nature of the note attack.

Attacks: Vel 1-9 natural attack
(CC21: 1-5) Vel 10-127 Staccato 4x RR pp, mf, & ‘noise’
(CC21: 6-127) Vel 10-127 Spiccato 8x RR pp, mf, & ‘noise’.


Q: Is there any way to alter the 1-9 velocity range of a natural attack. I think my keyboard just isn't sensitive enough to make hitting this range reliably, so this is a very major niggle.

In fact I'd go so far as to say that the added playability of the staccato comes at

Similarly for the progressive legato which is sensitive to a 1-9 velocity.

Alternately, it would be nice to just turn off the staccato feature entirely in some circumstances. Especially if this is where time machine is hitting the CPU.


Thanks!
Sorry to reply on my personal account here, I’m on the train home and thought I’d give you a quick answer:

1. It’s my understanding that arpeggios are the larger intervals - similar to what Paul is doing in the opening of his walkthrough.

2. Looks like you got this one!

3. Time machine does trigger here I believe actually - will confirm!

4. Currently this wouldn’t be possible I’m afraid, at least for now. Perhaps you could look to set up a custom velocity curve to reach the softer levels easier?

Hope that helps!
 
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Geoff Grace

Senior Member
I echo a need for the same patch for Cello and Viola!!
Yes, I will echo that as well! (I have a feeling this delay setting will be on infinite repeat.)

The viola as it stands is already probably the best available from any library. If a Virtuoso Total Performance patch were to be created for this as well, then it would be head and shoulders above any other sampled viola out there.

And of course, a Virtuoso Total Performance patch for the cello would probably be even more useful than one for the viola.

Best,

Geoff
 

Rob Elliott

Senior Member
Initially passed on this release with the gaping hole of a useable legato instrument. This is excellent and has largely changed my mind. One question - when (if) will this same clever scripting be applied to the other instruments (or can it without additional sampling.) I am especially interested in the cello having this.
 

prodigalson

Senior Member
I'd suggest everyone read the manual regarding this patch. It can do even more than what Paul mentions in the video.

e.g. with vibrato set to progressive vibrato, different velocities trigger different speeds of progression. :2thumbs:

also while playing short notes, the vibrato control can determine whether you get a spiccato or a staccato.
 

Alex Fraser

Senior Member
Hey Luke, Andy uses a Fatar/Studio Logic Numa, but mentions that any weighted keyboard would suffice.
**The Golden Harpsichord**

Scene: The Spitfire Audio offices, just after business hours. Sandy from support is clearing up the last messages of the day.

Sandy: Hey, Paul. Someone on VI control is asking what keyboard Andy uses.

Paul: Hmmn. OK, let's ask him. Come with me. And bring your laptop.

Paul leads Sandy to the back of the Spitfire offices, down a staircase and to the end of a long corridor. They arrive at a large, locked door.

Sandy: I don't understand...

Paul: We keep Andy down here away from prying eyes. His talent is so immense, we don't want anyone else stealing him. Chris Hein tried to steal him once..

Sandy: (Looks worried.) So that's why no-one has ever...

Paul unlocks the door and he enters with Sandy. Inside is a huge room, so opulent it makes Hans Zimmer's room look like a student dumpster. In the center of the room is a large leather chair - almost a throne. A man is seated in the chair, studying what appears to be an ancient music manuscript. The man is wearing silk robes and has his back to the door. His face is concealed by shadows.

Paul: Andy...Sandy. Sandy...Andy. Er, Andy. The proles on VI control wanted to know what keyboard you use to write music with. Could you tell us?

The man in the chair lazily gestures to a large object in the corner of the room.

Sandy: (Gasps.) That looks like a..a golden harpsichord...

Paul: Yep.

Sandy: That must have cost a huge amount of money..

Paul: Well, we don't give Spitfire libraries away for free. (Winks.) The internet commoners will never believe us though. Tell them Andy uses..anything. Make it up.

Sandy spends a moment typing on his laptop and looks up to find Paul back in the doorway, about to shut the door.

Sandy: Hey..what...

Paul: Yeah...I think I've said too much. You'll enjoy it down here with Andy. He's good company. At least when he's not writing music.

Sandy: Wait...

Paul: I'll send Christian down with some snacks for you on Monday. If you're well behaved. (Laughs.)

Paul slams the door. The sound echos down the corridor, drowning out the cries of terror.
 
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muziksculp

Senior Member
Thanks to Spitfire for the Solo Violin Perfomance Patch update. Great improvements !

Would love it if they do the same to the Solo Cello, and Viola.
 

Rob Elliott

Senior Member
Someone who has this - how is the 'stark' non-vibrato legato transitions sounding (at all xfade levels). For this present score I need a 'lyrical fiddle'. Me thinks this might cover that (be great if I could save a little cash on having to hire a live player for an already limited budget.)
 

LamaRose

Gato Mighty!
Comment/question to SF: It really helps to be able to adjust velocity level triggers to better accommodate personal playing styles and keyboard velocity curves... is this something you can include in this and other libraries like BDT?
 
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