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Spitfire - Hans Zimmer Strings 24 Hours Left! ENDING Tuesday 5th June 23:59 BST

Parsifal666

I don't even own a DAW, I'm just a troll.
Oh, since this is Spitfire, I must mention my delight at what is probably a relatively little known patch in their libraries: Albion Legacy's muted piano patches! I've had a great time getting my Goldsmith on with that sucker! Think Capricorn One, First Blood, etc.
 

blougui

Senior Member
So no contrary opinions to who paid for the thread?
Here are the rules for the Commercial announcement forums :

Also, note that Commercial Announcements are a “safe zone” for the companies who post. Negative comments or discussion about competing libraries are not allowed. Sample Talk and all other areas of the forum are free game, of course, but in this section, we ask that the companies not have to deal with any conflict.
It usually is not that "straight upon the button" but you got the idea. Hope that helps...
 

LowweeK

Loïc D
Oh, since this is Spitfire, I must mention my delight at what is probably a relatively little known patch in their libraries: Albion Legacy's muted piano patches! I've had a great time getting my Goldsmith on with that sucker! Think Capricorn One, First Blood, etc.
Now that you mention it, the legacy directory has a lot of hidden gems :)

To stick back to the previous feud, I do think that some people are mistaking the collaboration of Spitfire & HZS, the composer itself (which I like a lot BTW), and the library as a tool.

Buying HZS doesn't mean necessarily that you're a fan-boy or trying to mimic Hans Zimmer.
You're just buying a composition tool, no ? (which I sadly won't since I'm just amateur composer without any music income haha).
After all, I've got a Stratocaster and never tried to sound like Jimi Hendrix or Eric Clapton (though I confess for David Gilmour :) ).

Then it's up to the composer to be creative by writing skills or further processing of sample.
...Or not creative at all, if your director urges you to sound like Hans. :)
 

Parsifal666

I don't even own a DAW, I'm just a troll.
Now that you mention it, the legacy directory has a lot of hidden gems :)

To stick back to the previous feud, I do think that some people are mistaking the collaboration of Spitfire & HZS, the composer itself (which I like a lot BTW), and the library as a tool.

Buying HZS doesn't mean necessarily that you're a fan-boy or trying to mimic Hans Zimmer.
You're just buying a composition tool, no ? (which I sadly won't since I'm just amateur composer without any music income haha).
After all, I've got a Stratocaster and never tried to sound like Jimi Hendrix or Eric Clapton (though I confess for David Gilmour :) ).

Then it's up to the composer to be creative by writing skills or further processing of sample.
...Or not creative at all, if your director urges you to sound like Hans. :)
I remember when I first bought Zebra HZ...at first I had a ball just trying to emulate the sounds from Dark Knight and Man of Steel. And I still love that side of it. The cool thing for me was, I saw where I was using the synth too much like some toy and not getting any real, personally expressive use out of it. So I started studying sound design and Zebra off places like ADSR and learned how to make these sounds more personal.

HZ remains my favorite synth, but just as much for the patches I created as for the "HZ experience". It, like so many other things in music, can be a terrifically inspiring launch pad for future self-expression.

Caffeine pills given out on the line to the left...
 

Mateo Pascual

New Member
Buying HZS doesn't mean necessarily that you're a fan-boy or trying to mimic Hans Zimmer.
You're just buying a composition tool, no ?
This is also what I think. Two different composers using the exact same tools will create different music. And this library is no exception. I don't think 99% of people interested in HZS will use it as their only string library anyway, so it is more about adding new options to an already existing/always expanding template.
 

Soundhound

Senior Member
That's certainly how I'm planning on using it. Mostly those unusual gigantic yet incredibly soft sounds.

That and scaring the shit out of the cats.


This is also what I think. Two different composers using the exact same tools will create different music. And this library is no exception. I don't think 99% of people interested in HZS will use it as their only string library anyway, so it is more about adding new options to an already existing/always expanding template.
 

windyweekend

Active Member
This is also what I think. Two different composers using the exact same tools will create different music. And this library is no exception. I don't think 99% of people interested in HZS will use it as their only string library anyway, so it is more about adding new options to an already existing/always expanding template.
It's just a tool at the end of the day, but a nice one. Just because you have a gold plated, bespoke pencil won't make you Shakespeare though. It all comes down to how you use it. The only similarity we're all buying into here though is that we all get that beautiful airy Air 'air' - which you simply can't reproduce any other way.
 

Parsifal666

I don't even own a DAW, I'm just a troll.
It's just a tool at the end of the day, but a nice one. Just because you have a gold plated, bespoke pencil won't make you Shakespeare though. It all comes down to how you use it. The only similarity we're all buying into here though is that we all get that beautiful airy Air 'air' - which you simply can't reproduce any other way.
The last of which makes things sooo tricky during the mixdown...I can't count how many times I'd finish a composition, listen back, and every time the Albion "Air-baked" reverb would make those specific instruments sound like they were further away than the other, non-roomy instruments.

I'd rather NOT have that AIR sound and have the choice to add the IR I want, but that's just me. Granted, I do think sketches made solely with the abovementioned Air-y instruments sound really good.
 

JohnG

Senior Member
Just because you have a gold plated, bespoke pencil won't make you Shakespeare though
I've seen this sentiment expressed over and over and I totally disagree with it. Not picking on you in particular, but I keep reading it "Composer X can make a bucket of nails sound like great music." If that's the case, why do many of the most widely admired composers in Hollywood buy new samples?

When I started, electronic music sounded awful -- samples were terrible, really; extremely limited in the articulations they could produce, and many of the sounds themselves are / were thin or soulless. No matter how much time you lavished on them they could only execute a limited number of ideas, and those poorly.

And the thing is -- if you work in media, the approval process means that you're stuck with the limits of your mockups to a great extent. Unless you're John Williams.

Nearly every cue I write has to be auditioned by someone, often a lot of someones, and if it sounds unconvincing, it gets the "I just don't know..." "not sure...." and I have to rewrite it.

And it's not just that, feeble samples affect my creative side too. Listening to work I did 10 years ago or more, I hear myself constantly disguising it with orchestration tricks to mask the shortcomings of the samples or synths. Still do it, really, though things sound infinitely better. I'm working on something right now and even with the 10,000 samples I have I still can't execute what a 26 person orchestra can do.

Why buy anything new at all?

What I'd love is a REALLY compelling set of samples so that I can actually write a solo line that is even 40% as good as the real thing. A good cellist or oboe player or anything, really, can make you feel something valid and non-trivial, whereas most solo samples just can't quite get there.

Simplicity and boldness with a single idea sometimes says more than a full orchestra, but weak samples can't execute that.

Great samples won't make you Beethoven or Eliot Goldenthal, no, but they can open doors, creatively and professionally.
 

Parsifal666

I don't even own a DAW, I'm just a troll.
Great samples won't make you Beethoven or Eliot Goldenthal, no, but they can open doors, creatively and professionally.
They can also be profoundly inspiring. I actually sketched an entire symphony with just Bernard Herrmann Orchestral Toolkit, the Summer it came out. It was that impactful on me.

I mean, the symphony sucked, but that's another story I (lucky for everyone) won't tell.
 

windyweekend

Active Member
I keep reading it "Composer X can make a bucket of nails sound like great music." If that's the case, why do many of the most widely admired composers in Hollywood buy new samples?

And the thing is -- if you work in media, the approval process means that you're stuck with the limits of your mockups to a great extent. Unless you're John Williams.
I totally agree with you that the quality of the samples makes a huge difference (otherwise I wouldn't be here and bought this), but at the end of the day if you're not extracting/creating the right emotion from the music with a decent melody then it doesn't matter how good the samples or instruments are. I sat through a symphony recently and even though the players were fantastic performers, the whole thing felt like an emotional clusterf to me. Didn't resonate, sounded cacophonous, and actually drained me (I'm not going to mention the composer else I'll be inviting arrows from every direction). Conversely I recently heard Max Richter's taboo theme, which I (and even my kids) found infinitely more emotive. Nothing but a single (very simple) melody on a piano. The closer to reality we can get the better we'll sound and the happier our Directors will be, but you can't beat a good simple melody if you ask me.
 

Mateo Pascual

New Member
It's just a tool at the end of the day, but a nice one. Just because you have a gold plated, bespoke pencil won't make you Shakespeare though. It all comes down to how you use it. The only similarity we're all buying into here though is that we all get that beautiful airy Air 'air' - which you simply can't reproduce any other way.
Yes :) that's for sure, and the reason Tundra was an insta-buy for me. That was taking into account I don't have much use for those softer articulations, but I really love that library and brings something new to the table. The soft patches in HZS demos sound lovely as well, but again, not something I would use all the time. So I'm waiting for more walkthroughs that showcase other areas of the library, especially one with the legatos and very curious also about the different mic positions because I hear a lot of room in the demos. I know, when you have a great room you want the sound of it, but there is probably a bit too much for my taste. Would be great to know how much of it can be fine tuned with the mics options.
 

procreative

Senior Member
Off topic slightly, but I think we have already landed in the realm of "almost the real thing". We have just got so much more picky and spoilt. I remember firing up my JX3P and playing the String pad and being blown away back in 1983, then my jaw dropping at the Strings my JV880 could muster.

But none of these had much more than "Strings Arco" or "String Shorts". And mic positions...?

Sure there is a long way to go to get the vibrancy of a [good] real orchestra, but its definitely enough to get your ideas across, if not good enough for the final cut.

Listen to some 1970s orchestral recordings, especially those Pop cover discs, the production was pretty ropey and some of the playing rather mushy. Some of them even sound like bad samples.

If you have ever tried recording a demo on a 4 track cassette recorder, using a cheap mixer, one rack FX unit, a couple of stomp boxes and your mums hifi speakers. Anything else is pure gold!

By the way this is a very bold product, not for me, but thats only because I have to try to put a lid on the GBs of sample data I have accrued and I just cannot fit any more drives!!
 

windyweekend

Active Member
Off topic slightly, but I think we have already landed in the realm of "almost the real thing". We have just got so much more picky and spoilt. I remember firing up my JX3P and playing the String pad and being blown away back in 1983, then my jaw dropping at the Strings my JV880 could muster.

But none of these had much more than "Strings Arco" or "String Shorts". And mic positions...?

Sure there is a long way to go to get the vibrancy of a [good] real orchestra, but its definitely enough to get your ideas across, if not good enough for the final cut.

Listen to some 1970s orchestral recordings, especially those Pop cover discs, the production was pretty ropey and some of the playing rather mushy. Some of them even sound like bad samples.

If you have ever tried recording a demo on a 4 track cassette recorder, using a cheap mixer, one rack FX unit, a couple of stomp boxes and your mums hifi speakers. Anything else is pure gold!

By the way this is a very bold product, not for me, but thats only because I have to try to put a lid on the GBs of sample data I have accrued and I just cannot fit any more drives!!
So spot on. The 4 track thing always comes back to my mind. I remember spending weeks bouncing and rebouncing just to get to 16 tracks. When I got my hands on Steinberg Pro 24 and an Atari ST I thought I'd been given the keys to the kingdom. Got to be so grateful for what we have to play with nowadays.
 

procreative

Senior Member
So spot on. The 4 track thing always comes back to my mind. I remember spending weeks bouncing and rebouncing just to get to 16 tracks. When I got my hands on Steinberg Pro 24 and an Atari ST I thought I'd been given the keys to the kingdom. Got to be so grateful for what we have to play with nowadays.
My first 4 track was a crappy Vestax thing, then I thought I had arrived when I got a Yamaha one that ran double speed for better quality. Using studios with 8, 16 then 24 tracks seemed great, then came the messing with SMPTE and Tape Stripes to get the Midi gear to sync (half the time it didn't sync right buggering the mixdown).
 

Parsifal666

I don't even own a DAW, I'm just a troll.
I started out with Finale Notepad, and then GPO. I still have fond memories of watching "Amadeus" then getting turned onto Wagner...shortly after I discovered the (FREE!) Notepad and was impressed by the sound.

These days, after EW, SF and CH...doesn't sound so good lol! But it was an inspired, hopeful, fun time.
 

artomatic

I compose with my E A R S
I don't see any portamento arts listed. I'm sure it's because recording portamento with 60 violins, etc. would render it useless!
I do wish it was available for the smaller (20 section) sizes.
 
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