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Spitfire Audio ' BBCSO Pro ' for the main Orch. Template Library ?

muziksculp

Senior Member
Hi,

I'm planning to use the Spitfire Audio BBCSO Pro for my main/primary Orchestral Library template, then complementing it with other libraries as needed, for both layering, and adding more variety ?

Anyone here doing this ? I'm very interested in reading your feedback on this.

My plan is to use the BBCSO Pro for my main go to orchestral library, by hosting it on a Slave PC via VE-Pro 7, and use my master PC to add more libraries as needed to the main BBCSO Pro template.

Thanks,
Muziksculp
 

holywilly

Senior Member
I did the opposite, I’m using VSL Synchron and OT as my main workhorse in my template and added BBCSO Pro as secondary to accompany with VSL. It’s just that the Spitfire player isn’t tweakable enough to create something I’m used to VSL’s Vienna instruments Pro and Synchron Player. Otherwise BBCSO instruments are beautifully sampled.
 

jaketanner

Senior Member
I am kind of doing this now. I started with a BBC template I made/modified to work specifically on a piece I have in mind and so far I love it. What I added though are only instruments that are missing, nothing to layer with because I feel the whole idea behind BBC is to use it in its "as-is" state as much as possible to reap the benefit.

I added an Alto Flute & Euphonium from VSL solo instruments. I am also using some ethnic percussion from Cineperc and NI Discovery Series...but timpani are BBC. So it's similar to what you want to do...but ask yourself why you feel you have to add to BBC...it's a great base orchestra...just add the missing instruments like the two I mentioned and a piano.

One library that I did hear that blends well with BBC brass is Sample Modeling (I don't have it though). I also experimented with layering NSS with BBC and works well...although I won't do it for my compositions...don't feel either needs the boost (personal taste).
 

DovesGoWest

Senior Member
Im doing this, i started with the the spitfire template and added a number of other sections, such as drums\guitars\vocals\synths\keys etc for other work I do. Each of these sections follows a similar layout as what spitfire did with the BBCSO and uses the same type of routing however for example under my synths folder i have this:

SYNTHS <- Folder
UNUSED <- Folder
Kontact01 <- VST
Kontact02
Kontact03
Zebra2 HZ 01
Zebra2 HZ 02
Zebra2 HZ 03

All VST's are disabled if i need an instance of Zebra i just enable it and move it up to the top level SYNTHS folder and collapse the unused. It means i have everything available and just need to enable them as i need.

With respect other orchestral libraries i have added Areia Lite and CineBrass both of which layer very easily with BBCSO. At first i create separate folders for each of them, however now i change to only have folders for instruments so under brass folder i have folders for each instrument type and then within it a mix of different vendors. Again everything is disabled and when i use and instrument i just move it to under the top level brass folder
 

Jeremy Spencer

Senior Member
As a primary library? Personally, I wouldn’t be able to do this. I find BBCSO great for certain styles, but not as a “bread and butter” library. Plus, the brass is simply too weak IMO. I usually blend certain BBCSO patches with other libraries.
 

John R Wilson

Senior Member
As a primary library? Personally, I wouldn’t be able to do this. I find BBCSO great for certain styles, but not as a “bread and butter” library. Plus, the brass is simply too weak IMO. I usually blend certain BBCSO patches with other libraries.

I think BBCSO works well as a bread and butter and main library. It covers all the most common articulations, it's flexible with its mic options and has brilliant recording quality. I use BBCSO as a main library then supplement it with other libraries when needed.
 

AllanH

Senior Member
For the type of classical music where BBCSO shines, I would say "absolutely yes". If you write more modern and intense music (e.g. trailer), I think you will find the brass a bit too weak. You can always process the brass a bit for added intensity.

I believe that someone earlier explained that European french horns typically have a smaller bore than American FHs and thus sound a bit thinner. That certainly matches what I hear, but I don't really know. That being said, BBCSO is beautiful and I use it all the time.
 
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muziksculp

muziksculp

Senior Member
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Hi,

Thanks for all the helpful feedback.

Basically, I need to have a very good orchestral foundation template, and after listening to many demos created using the BBCSO Pro, that sound excellent, and very realistic, I thought it might be the best library to use for this functionality.

I'm not restricted to the BBCSO Pro, but the cohesive sound, mic options, articulations, and ease of use made me think that it is a very good choice. I think of it as a super high-end General Midi module for orchestral music production. :)

I'm not into very loud, boombastic brass sounds, i.e. trailer music. but for Epic music, I can always complement them with other libraries. So I feel the BBCSO Pro Brass is good enough for my needs. as a starting point. Same goes for the rest of the orchestra.

I think I will sometimes want a new color, timbre, or characteristic sound for a certain section, so layering is one way to achieve this, but in general, I think the BBCSO Pro is quite a capable library to be used as the foundation of my orchestral template. Everything else that is missing, I can add from other libraries on an as needed basis. I have a lot of libraries to choose from.

Cheers,
Muziksculp
 

DovesGoWest

Senior Member
Hi,

Thanks for all the helpful feedback.

Basically, I need to have a very good orchestral foundation template, and after listening to many demos created using the BBCSO Pro, that sound excellent, and very realistic, I thought it might be the best library to use for this functionality.

I'm not restricted to the BBCSO Pro, but the cohesive sound, mic options, articulations, and ease of use made me think that it is a very good choice. I think of it as a super high-end General Midi module for orchestral music production. :)

I'm not into very loud, boombastic brass sounds, i.e. trailer music. but for Epic music, I can always complement them with other libraries. So I feel the BBCSO Pro Brass is good enough for my needs. as a starting point. Same goes for the rest of the orchestra.

I think I will sometimes want a new color, timbre, or characteristic sound for a certain section, so layering is one way to achieve this, but in general, I think the BBCSO Pro is quite a capable library to be used as the foundation of my orchestral template. Everything else that is missing, I can add from other libraries on an as needed basis. I have a lot of libraries to choose from.

Cheers,
Muziksculp
This is exactly how i started, i recently added CineBrass Core to beef up the brass and give me some of that epicness when i need it. I also added Areia Lite when it was on intro as i felt the shorts had a lot more bit in them than the BBC so gave me the ability to have a more zimmer style when needed.
 

Monkberry

Active Member
I'm in the same boat. I plan to pick up BBCSO Pro when it goes on sale. Already have Cinebrass Core, Pro, Sonore, & Descant as well as CinePerc. Bought a new Samsung EVO 870 2TB drive for BBCSO. As much as I like the Abbey Road One sound, I also like the sound of the BBCSO room. Overall, I think the library sounds pretty good.
 
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muziksculp

muziksculp

Senior Member
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Hi,

A few questions.

For those using BBCSO Pro only on their main computer. Are you basically using a disabled template, and enabling the instruments on an as needed basis ? or have everything loaded up for instant access/playability ?

Do you find enabling a disabled instance in a template taking too much time, that interrupts your workflow ? or is the interruption quite minimal ?

Are you using a lot of the mic options ? or just the preset mix mics ? or customizing your mics ? Since this has an impact of the amount of RAM that will be consumed.

Thanks,
Muziksculp
 

John R Wilson

Senior Member
Hi,

A few questions.

For those using BBCSO Pro only on their main computer. Are you basically using a disabled template, and enabling the instruments on an as needed basis ? or have everything loaded up for instant access/playability ?

Do you find enabling a disabled instance in a template taking too much time, that interrupts your workflow ? or is the interruption quite minimal ?

Are you using a lot of the mic options ? or just the preset mix mics ? or customizing your mics ? Since this has an impact of the amount of RAM that will be consumed.

Thanks,
Muziksculp

I work with a disabled template in Cubase. Works very nicely in Cubase. Just assign a keyswitch for enabling and disabling tracks. Enabling and disabling tracks doesn't interrupt my workflow at all.

I have started using just the tree mic when making a piece and will then enable more mics when doing a mix.
 
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DennyB

Member
I use BBCSO (and some other stuff) and a disabled template in Cubase and love it. I use the expression maps from Art Conductor, everything is pre-wired, all I do is turn on each instrument as I need it. I have a ‘sketching’ piano, brass, strings, and ww track up on top alongside the tempo and chord tracks to goof around with. I leave the piano enabled in the template and the others are disabled but are light versions that don’t take up much ram when I enable them. Then I sketch there and move the lines down as I need them.
 

muk

Senior Member
For templates I use VE Pro. I have one BBCSO full orchestral template, and individual templates for each section of the orchestra (winds, brass, percussion, strings). That way I can load whatever section I need. In these templates I have loaded the standard orchestral instruments 2-2-2-2, 3-2-3-1, harp, timpani, and strings). The additional instruments are loaded and routed in Vienna Ensemble, but disabled (piccolo, bass clarinet, english horn, contra bassoon etc.).

When not working on full orchestral music, more often than not I will start with a blank project and just load the instruments I need one by one.

As to the mic options. For the mocking up I often just use the Jake Jackson mix 1. Then for the mixing I change it to whatever I need for the project. Most often just the tree and a variable amount of close mic. Sometimes I'll use a bit of the outriggers, ambient, or bleed mics. I rarely use the other options. Also, I almost never use the Jackson mixes for the final mix. For the music I write they are usually too wet.

I am working on an old pc with 32gb of ram, so the number of mics I can use simultaneously is limited. For me it's not a big problem though, as I rarely use more than two or three mics at once. The huge number of mics may tempt you to load up a bit of everything. My finding was that I preferred the sound when working with one main mic position (usually the decca tree), and add in just one or two other mics as needed. A bit of close if you want a closer or more snappy sound. Outriggers or sides if I want more width. Or ambient if I want more hall.

Overall BBCSO has grown on me rather quickly I must say. Especially since the last update, which improved the performance legato patches of several instruments. I was sceptical about the limited number of dynamic layers. And I'd still wish it had one or two more. In the end the recordings in this library are so stellar, and the whole orchestra blends together so nicely that I really like working with it. It has become an important tool that I use quite often. Most instruments are really nice. And when you use several together, with BBCSO you get a natural sense of width and depth that I don't hear in any other sample library.
 

Camus

Active Member
Have a look at Mattia Chiappa´s 10 Orchetration Hacks (which are in fact 70 + hacks already ....) He´s working with BBSO Pro as the foundation and adds other vendors bit by bit to improve.
When you check out the orchestration Tips on youtube (or even as a patreon) you can see what you can obviously achieve with BBCSO wuith the respectice craftmanship. It is impressive and a impressive range of styles. Definitely worth walking that route.
 

Camus

Active Member
but in general:
for shure you can achieve a good template with other libraries like Sable & Mural (SSS & SCS) and the respective WWs & BR / Berlin Series / Cinematic Studio Series / VSL Synchron.
And you can run different Templates for different musical tasks.
It´s more a matter of deciding to go one road, work on it and then add and adapt. We easily get into the trap to blockade ourselves with too many options, instead of commiting to one as the basic and expand from there.
 
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