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Sampler/EXS - true legato + demo

clisma

Senior Member
Hey thanks for posting! This is really great, well done! I've just had some time to try it. I can see how you've set up the group for the legato transitions. Don't know what's going on with the scripting beyond what you show in the video and tried myself, so if you feel like further explaining things (especially for non-scripters), that would be a welcome addition.

Great to know that this type of stuff is possible on Logic's sampler. Would be wonderful to have some commercial options like this for it, seeing that the CPU overhead is completely negligible.
 

Alex Fraser

Requires ☕️
Hey Fred, thanks for this.
I've often wondered how some of Logic's stock sounds (studio horns, strings) achieve the "legato" effect. Something along these lines perhaps, with a script behind the scenes?
 
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FredW

FredW

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Hey thanks for posting! This is really great, well done! I've just had some time to try it. I can see how you've set up the group for the legato transitions. Don't know what's going on with the scripting beyond what you show in the video and tried myself, so if you feel like further explaining things (especially for non-scripters), that would be a welcome addition.

Great to know that this type of stuff is possible on Logic's sampler. Would be wonderful to have some commercial options like this for it, seeing that the CPU overhead is completely negligible.
Thanks! My first idea was to set up something so people can create true legato instruments themselves without having to know how to script. Although you need recorded interval samples (like the ones in the example) and do the mapping.

Some things to be aware of regarding the mapping in the video example:

The zones in both groups have been stretched to make the instrument more lightweight.

Legato intervals are mapped by velocity so I set the velocity slider to 0.0 in Sampler (front panel).

Down intervals start at velocity nr 1 (smallest interval) and then stack up in the velocity map (one octave of intervals = 12 zones stacked). Up intervals start at velocity nr 66 and then stack up from there. The root note is always the second note in the transition. Sorry if it’s confusing, I can try to explain better if it’s not clear =)

If the legato samples include root note name and interval number then Sampler's auto mapping function can set this up for you in 3 mouse clicks, which is great and saves tons of time (inherited from Redmatica Keymap I guess?)

I tried to make it simple for now but have also been playing around a bit with speed detection, legato note offset, polyphonic legato etc. Maybe there will be an advanced version one day =)
 
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FredW

FredW

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Hey Fred, thanks for this.
I've often wondered how some of Logic's stock sounds (studio horns, strings) achieve the "legato" effect. Something along these lines perhaps, with a script behind the scenes?
Perhaps! I have never opened those instruments but if they have true legato they certainly need to have some kind of script and recorded interval samples.
 

clisma

Senior Member
There is, sort of (for the old old VSL EXS stuff):

Indeed, thank you. I'm aware of it thanks to your previous post on a similar thread where Peter Schartz' legato-sizer script was discussed. I don't use any of the old VSL stuff (anymore).

Rather, I'm hoping that in light of what can be achieved with the internal Logic instruments that use legato, and with what @FredW has achieved here (specifically in conjunction with having actual legato transitions, unlike the above-mentioned script), might interest smaller developers and return to a more EXS/Sampler friendly environment where developers create instruments for this player as well, like they once used to do.
 

clisma

Senior Member
Thanks! My first idea was to set up something so people can create true legato instruments themselves without having to know how to script. Although you need recorded interval samples (like the ones in the example) and do the mapping.

Some things to be aware of regarding the mapping in the video example:

The zones in both groups have been stretched to make the instrument more lightweight.

Legato intervals are mapped by velocity so I set the velocity slider to 0.0 in Sampler (front panel).

Down intervals start at velocity nr 1 (smallest interval) and then stack up in the velocity map (one octave of intervals = 12 zones stacked). Up intervals start at velocity nr 66 and then stack up from there. The root note is always the second note in the transition. Sorry if it’s confusing, I can try to explain better if it’s not clear =)

If the legato samples include root note name and interval number then Sampler's auto mapping function can set this up for you in 3 mouse clicks, which is great and saves tons of time (inherited from Redmatica Keymap I guess?)

I tried to make it simple for now but have also been playing around a bit with speed detection, legato note offset, polyphonic legato etc. Maybe there will be an advanced version one day =)
Thank you for that explanation, it is very clear! I was able to glean as much from your patch, but having you explain it is great for future reference. I'd love to put this into action in the future but writing notes tends to get in the way :)

Speed detection would be a wonderful and musically very useful addition indeed. Legato offset could be great for fine-tuning the sound as well. There is some great promise here, Fred!
 

Kent

sleepy member
Indeed, thank you. I'm aware of it thanks to your previous post on a similar thread where Peter Schartz' legato-sizer script was discussed. I don't use any of the old VSL stuff (anymore).

Rather, I'm hoping that in light of what can be achieved with the internal Logic instruments that use legato, and with what @FredW has achieved here (specifically in conjunction with having actual legato transitions, unlike the above-mentioned script), might interest smaller developers and return to a more EXS/Sampler friendly environment where developers create instruments for this player as well, like they once used to do.
Sorry, that VSL legato script is for true legato, haha. I might have misunderstood your point though.
 

Trevor Meier

Friend-Fu Master and Wizard of Odd
Tried this out today… very cool! Works nicely.

I have some recordings with baked-in legato > sustains. I’ve been trying to figure out how to best set up Sampler to play them. I may try your velocity layering trick, but I’ll still have to figure out how to write the code for Scripter to get it to detect the played interval and then select the correct velocity layer.

Any tips on how best to get Scripter to play back a sample according to the two-note interval that’s played?
 
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FredW

FredW

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Tried this out today… very cool! Works nicely.

I have some recordings with baked-in legato > sustains. I’ve been trying to figure out how to best set up Sampler to play them. I may try your velocity layering trick, but I’ll still have to figure out how to write the code for Scripter to get it to detect the played interval and then select the correct velocity layer.

Any tips on how best to get Scripter to play back a sample according to the two-note interval that’s played?
Hi, you can use this script with your own recordings. It should work if you have separated sustain and legato groups.

If you want to make your own script and you have done it before in Kontakt or some other sampler it should be pretty straightforward using JavaScript/Scripter. Store the pitch of a note using ‘event.pitch’. Calculate the difference in pitch between two notes to get an interval. Set ‘event.velocity’ to that interval and send the event.
 

Trevor Meier

Friend-Fu Master and Wizard of Odd
This will be my first venture into scripting a sampled instrument. It sounds quite straightforward - thanks for the tip!
 
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