Rupert Gregson-Williams - Insights Into The Early Days Of Sampling

redlester

Senior Member
Feeling anxious?
My body clock, at 60 years old, is now adjusted to getting up far earlier than when I was younger. But it's still about two hours later than yours Christian!

For me, it's about 9pm when my creative juices start to flow!

Once a night owl, always one. All the best stuff used to be on BBC2 after 11pm...
 

redlester

Senior Member
Pianobook is such an awesome treasure trove I can barely keep up with it. When I visit the site I feel like the Dutch guy in the Grolsch adverts.... "schtop...schlow down... "

Only joking, it's just the most wonderful resource and constant inspiration. And I expect will create a whole new generation of samplists. Thank you for this. :thumbsup:
 
"Thrumming", "swarms", it's all weft to me. See Michel Chion's Guide to Sound Objects:

78. WEFT (T)
1) A type of excentric sound of prolonged duration, created by superimposing prolonged sounds, “sheaves”, “fusions of slowly evolving sounds” (450) which are heard as groups, macro-objects, slowly developing, scarcely differentiated structures. The weft is denoted by the symbol T.

2) In addition to the usual so-called “mixed” wefts T, in which the variations of details are quite complex and unpredictable, there are also specific examples of redundant wefts of scarcely variable mass, notated Tn (“harmonic” weft based on tonic sounds) or Tx (“complex” weft of complex sounds).

3) Wefts are not encountered solely in natural phenomena and musique concrète, but also very commonly in traditional symphonic music.

a) Originality of the weft.
The weft belongs to the type of prolonged sound that could be analysed as an amalgamation of different intermingled constituent objects, but which present to the ear as macro-objects bound together by the sensation of a “causal unity”. As a macro-object with mobile parts, but whose general profile is fairly continuous and fixed, the weft takes its place in the TARTYP in the column of homogeneous sounds “where it extends the category in the direction of originality”. (457)

b) The weft in the typology of varying objects.
The complementary typology of variations begins by considering the possibility of new distinctions between “fluctuating” wefts Tz, developing wefts Ty and “modulating” wefts (i.e. developing by stages) Tx, but ultimately it classifies the general type weft T with objects varying slowly in a progressive and continuous manner (variation of the “progress” type, see 30).
 

Mike Greene

Senior Member
Moderator
I like that you compare the sample library creation process with diarrhea. :grin:

I'm becoming more and more convinced that fewer samples are often, if not usually, better than more samples. Although ... trying to sell a library which admits to fewer samples is another story.

I was showing RealiDrums at NAMM one year and can't even count how many times I was asked, "How many round robins for each drum? How many velocity layers?" I'd answer, "Round robins aren't the point with this set." Then I'd play some sounds and say, "That, that sound, is the point."

They'd invariably answer, "Sure, but how many round robins?"

Great
sunrise BTW.
 

novaburst

Senior Member
I think there are some that use alot of samples but i dont think they want the listener to feel there is a ton of samples being used, in thier music or mockup.

this may sound a little strange for instance a very quite piece, may have a ton of samples used to make that part, but they are going for a sculp or searching for a sound to creat that feel or vibe

so tons of samples may be used in any musical creation but you or the listener would not feel there is a ton of samples being used if that makes sense
 

Zero&One

Senior Member
@Mike Greene That's interesting to hear thanks.
Us humans do like our buzzwords. Companies can be their own worst enemies when they coin them sadly.

My friend wanted a TV. I suggested countless (including mine that he loved) and he always asked:
"How many NITs does it have?"
He didn't even really know what it is, but a *cough* forum told him the more the better dude.
Eventually he bought a NIT loaded TV for an extra £900. He's never mentioned his NITs since! Or even the TV for that matter!!
 

angeruroth

Meeb Avemcrit
Hmm, interesting indeed. Thanks!

I recently got stuck sampling my guitar and, being this the first time I try to do it right, I gave it a lot of thinking, trying a lot of different things with the gear available... and came to the conclusion that less notes were somehow a better approach for 3 reasons:
1. The whole post processing time would be huge, and I'm just sampling a guitar! I can't even guess what would take to sample a whole orchestra or something like that and turn it into a cohesive VI.
2. Some notes sound almost better when transposed than the actual notes. I'm not sure why. Maybe there are some subtle quirks that just turn me on.
3. I ran out of HD space :shocked:

But I do think the RRs are as important for short notes as subtle variations are for long notes.
I thought I could settle for 3 RRs, but every time I play the same note it's a bit different, and knowing the instrument it just sounds weird, so I've tried 4, 5... 10... And it's a nightmare! So now I'm thinking 5 could be enough, but... argh, it's so hard to set the limit...
 

MartinH.

Senior Member
@Mike Greene That's interesting to hear thanks.
Us humans do like our buzzwords. Companies can be their own worst enemies when they coin them sadly.

My friend wanted a TV. I suggested countless (including mine that he loved) and he always asked:
"How many NITs does it have?"
He didn't even really know what it is, but a *cough* forum told him the more the better dude.
Eventually he bought a NIT loaded TV for an extra £900. He's never mentioned his NITs since! Or even the TV for that matter!!
Never heard that term, but it seems to just mean brightness, right? Would be the cherry on top if your friend never puts it on max brightness and says "that would be way too bright, it hurts my eyes".