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Reverb for piano?

good

Member
Hi, all.
I usually play the piano solo, and I am using Spaces I.

I have the following options.
1) upgrade to Spaces II
2) purchase 7th heaven
3) purchase 7th heaven pro
4) find other reverb

so.. is there a big difference between 7th heaven basic and pro to play the piano?
or what else do you think is the best reverb for the piano?
 

maxime77

Active Member
I personally prefer algo for pianos because I don't like to have a strong sense of a room, just a slight tail. I use the Lexicon PCM Hall for that (the em7 preset).
 
As many would say, it depends on what you want to achieve.
A kind of trailer-ish, big atmospheric reverb which isn't supposed to sound realistic could be easily achieved with Eventide Black Hole (currently on sale https://www.pluginboutique.com/product/2-Effects/17-Reverb/2855-Blackhole )

If you want a more realistic, concert hall sounding reverb I would suggest a convolution based verb like Altiverb which is undeniably good. Spaces II might be quite good as well, I personally never used it.
 
OP
G

good

Member
I personally prefer algo for pianos because I don't like to have a strong sense of a room, just a slight tail. I use the Lexicon PCM Hall for that (the em7 preset).
I would like to use algo if I had the ability to use it well. But if the sound is awesome, whether it's algo or convolution is doesn't matter. I'll look for demos Lexicon is used, Thanks: )

If you want a more realistic, concert hall sounding reverb I would suggest a convolution based verb like Altiverb which is undeniably good. Spaces II might be quite good as well, I personally never used it.
Oh, I didn't mention it. I prefer a realistic sound that feels like a room or hall because the genre that I play is mainly classical music. Altiverb is also a good option. btw why aren't you using Spaces II?
 
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keepitsimple

Active Member
Too many good choices those days, you can't go wrong with whatever option you choose.

- Spaces II is fantastic for what you ask (putting piano inside a concert hall).

- Pro-R is a stellar algorithmic reverb. It's the only reverb i've been using for a while now. I use it for everything not just piano.

- For lush, Blackhole is hard to pass with the sale that's going on at the moment.

- Honorable mention to Breverb 2 which sounds great on piano.
 
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Oh, I didn't mention it. I prefer a realistic sound that feels like a room or hall because the genre that I play is mainly classical music. Altiverb is also a good option. btw why aren't you using Spaces II?
Ok, well I haven't bought Spaces II yet so that's why:)
With what @keepitsimple said it seems that Spaces II might be a good option, also considering you know its predecessor, Spaces I, pretty well
 

JohnRosso

New Member
LittlePlate with external EQ after it is cool. Typical lush plate + vibey spring/metallic sounds - awesome reverb!

Also ValhallaVintageVerb is really cool.

Blackhole is unique. Not your go-to reverb for piano I guess.
 
OP
G

good

Member
There are some free high quality Lexicon & TC Electronics reverb impulse responses available here:

https://audioengineering.co/free-classic-convolution-reverb-impulse-response-sets/?cn-reloaded=1
The data on the link above, except for Brcasti M7, seems to have to donate at least $1.(But it's almost free) And Fog Convolver is a program I've been needing. Thank you for introducing!

- Spaces II is fantastic for what you ask (putting piano inside a concert hall).
The upgrade to this is sure to increase the options of tone. The problem is its price. I had bought Spaces I just before the release of Spaces II, so I should have waited for a month.:sad:

Ok, well I haven't bought Spaces II yet so that's why:)
oh, my.. I think I should study English-reading skill tonight.:eek:
 
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keepitsimple

Active Member
Reviving this thread to say how good Blackhole is with pianos. I'm surprised how transparent it leaves the original source without coloring it or muddying it out, while providing sumptuous flourishing tails. This is the type of reverb that i seek for pianos. For some reason, i've never been a fan of reverbs that "put the piano in a concert hall".

Anyway, i'm pairing it with the VSL CFX and it's a match made in heaven.
 

chimuelo

Star Of Stage & Screen
The Strymon Big Sky. I got rid of hardware DSP and several VST Reverbs.
So many algorithms to pick from, and a supreme audio quality.

It sounds so good you find yourself writing for the particular sound on the unit.
For example a really old Soul song by Luther Ingram, If Loving You Is Wrong has a super simple hook line intro.

Not very exciting until you adjust the Decay to work with the Quarter/Half and Whole note melody.

I never wanted to play slow on purpose before.
Now I hesitate because the sound is so divine.
 
Reviving this thread to say how good Blackhole is with pianos. I'm surprised how transparent it leaves the original source without coloring it or muddying it out, while providing sumptuous flourishing tails. This is the type of reverb that i seek for pianos. For some reason, i've never been a fan of reverbs that "put the piano in a concert hall".

Anyway, i'm pairing it with the VSL CFX and it's a match made in heaven.
Can you share some classical settings for Blackhole ? Thank you.
 

Virtuoso

Active Member
If the aim is to have a neutral and realistic acoustic for classical piano, I would go for Seventh Heaven first. It's pretty much impossible to make it sound bad. You probably don't need the extra tweaking of the Pro version and the M7 v1 presets are all about realism. Another contender would be Exponential Audio Nimbus, or Phoenix if you're on a budget - if you can get over the ugly UI, they sound very good.

TC VSS3 was a great reverb 10 years ago and is still noteworthy for its control over early reflections, but it's hampered somewhat by being a mono to stereo algorithm (rather than true stereo), so it will not accurately respond to a potentially wide stereo source like piano. Good for putting dry mono sources in a natural acoustic though.

I have to say, Blackhole would be very far down my list of suitable reverbs for a natural classical piano application. It's a great sound design tool for creating swampy, other-worldly sounds and is fantastic on pads, but the swirly lush modulation will play havoc with a piano sound, leaving you feeling nauseous! It also has no control over early reflections, which are critical to getting that believable acoustic.
 

tack

Damned Dirty Ape
There was another thread a while back where we were talking about "warm and lush" reverbs for piano. I still use the Lexicon RHall myself.

I did a short video with a pretty simple (and consequently incomplete and much-to-be-criticized) comparison between the Lexicon, Pro-R, and VVV. May be useful here. FWIW, I bought Blackhole since, and although it's pretty cool, I still use the Lexicon on piano. :)

Edit: for classical where you want to simulate a real hall, this comparison certainly misses the mark. I'd say any of these reverbs could create good results for that purpose, but with very different settings. But I'd also try ValhallaRoom for that.

 
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