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Reverb chain tips? Need help!

I like music

Senior Member
Hi everyone,

This - I suspect - is a very easy one to answer for the people on here, but I'm not sure how to go about it.

I have 3 instances of the same reverb (one for Strings, one for Brass, one for Woods) ... as it turns out, after some testing, the ONLY difference between the 3 instances is the "Mix" setting.

My understanding is that "Mix" refers to the relative volume of the original signal vs the reverb. e.g. how much of that reverb is essentially overlaid with the original signal. Is that right?

If I'm right in this, then I don't need 3 reverbs, and just need some way to make sure that more or less of the same verb is applied to the different sections.

Currently I just went into Cubase's mix console, and applied each different reverb on the channel strip for the relevant channel strip (for the Kontakt instrument) but I'm sure there's a smarter way to do this so that I don't have to have 3 verb instances, which are identical except for the fact that on some instruments the verb needs to just be a bit more prominent.

Any help on best practises around how you can arrange your FX chain to solve the above, would be hugely appreciated.
 

Virtuoso

Active Member
Piece of cake - this is called an Audio Send, as distinct from an Insert which is what you've been doing up to now.

- Create an Effect Track and choose whatever plugin you want to use for your reverb. Give it a name like 'Main Reverb'. This Track is also known as a Bus.
- Select your audio track and, either in the Inspector or the Mix Console, select 'Audio Sends' or 'Sends'.
- Hover over the empty slot and a dropdown arrow will appear. Click it and select the name of the Effect Track you just created (eg 'Main Reverb').
- Hover over the top left of that box and click the 'Activate' button. Drag to set the level that you want to send from that channel (start around -11 and take it from there depending on how dry/wet you want the signal to be).
- Repeat for as many tracks as you want to send to that reverb.

The Effect Track can contain a whole chain of effects (EQ, Compression, Delay, Modulation, Reverb etc) if desired and you can also send your audio channels to multiple Buses in parallel, so it's a very flexible way of working that also maximises efficiency of your CPU. It also makes it easy to bypass multiple effects on multiple channels with a single click.
 
OP
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I like music

Senior Member
Piece of cake - this is called an Audio Send, as distinct from an Insert which is what you've been doing up to now.

- Create an Effect Track and choose whatever plugin you want to use for your reverb. Give it a name like 'Main Reverb'. This Track is also known as a Bus.
- Select your audio track and, either in the Inspector or the Mix Console, select 'Audio Sends' or 'Sends'.
- Hover over the empty slot and a dropdown arrow will appear. Click it and select the name of the Effect Track you just created (eg 'Main Reverb').
- Hover over the top left of that box and click the 'Activate' button. Drag to set the level that you want to send from that channel (start around -11 and take it from there depending on how dry/wet you want the signal to be).
- Repeat for as many tracks as you want to send to that reverb.

The Effect Track can contain a whole chain of effects (EQ, Compression, Delay, Modulation, Reverb etc) if desired and you can also send your audio channels to multiple Buses, so it's a very flexible way of working that also maximises efficiency of your CPU. It also makes it easy to bypass multiple effects on multiple channels with a single click.
I can't thank you enough for the detailed response. My CPU also thanks you (on a laptop you see, and so trying to make things more efficient!!!)

This'll work for MIDI in the same way right?

Just one follow-up question if you'd not mind! Does this mean that in the reverb itself, I should keep the Mix to 100% wet (because the level will now be controlled at the Bus level?)
 

Virtuoso

Active Member
It will work for Instrument Tracks using MIDI and yes, the Mix of your effect should be 100% wet. Most reverbs tend to default to full wet anyway, as it is quite common to use them this way.
 
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