Question about audio files location

Discussion in 'Mixing, Post-Production, and Effects' started by SergeD, Dec 6, 2018.

  1. SergeD

    SergeD Senior Member

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    Nov 16, 2006
    My new laptop (yeah!) has 2 ssd, the second one nesting all libraries. I'd like to record orchestral sections, one by one, on the second ssd meanwhile streaming from that same ssd. Should it be more appropriate to locate those audio tracks on the first ssd?
     
  2. Divico

    Divico Senior Member

    Havin a seperate disk for read only/heavy library stuff is always good. Often people recommend not to use your system drive for audio stuff. Id fill up one disk with samples and use the system one for the rest.
     
    richardt4520 likes this.
  3. Breaker

    Breaker Senior Member

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    Jul 17, 2017
    What do you mean with “recording”?
    Bouncing VI’s to audio?
     
  4. Divico

    Divico Senior Member

    Project files Id say. Recording audio in a studio usually likes to have a seperate drive, doubt that this is the same with bouncing stuff.
     
  5. OP
    OP
    SergeD

    SergeD Senior Member

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    Nov 16, 2006
    Thanks everyone, my question may seem odd but my audio tracks were located on a third drive on my last desktop (long time ago), which is not the case now.

    On this laptop, c:\ system drive only contains software and the D:\ Drive is filled with friendly cpu/ram samples. So, I wonder if that the d:\ drive may allow to simultaneously steam samples and play recorded tracks while recording Midi and audio stuff.
     
  6. Breaker

    Breaker Senior Member

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    Jul 17, 2017
    Depends how many voices you are streaming, how many audio tracks you are playing and how many audio tracks you are recording.
    In general I would definitely keep sample libraries separate from project files and audio, but with small projects this might work.
     
  7. MartinH.

    MartinH. Senior Member

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    Jun 16, 2018
    Only SSDs = don't worry about it (in most cases). Unless you're bandwidth capped (which I think is highly unlikely) an SSD should be able to handle all you throw at it. All the recommendations about splitting stuff accross drives come from the HDD era where there was considerable "seek time" for repositioning the drive-head and it made a world of a difference whether a drive had 1 task or 2 simultaneous tasks.
     
  8. OP
    OP
    SergeD

    SergeD Senior Member

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    Nov 16, 2006
    Thanks Breaker and Martin,

    Projects have not huge settings so i'm fine with yours responses.
     

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