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Presonus Studio One Pro 4.5 Released

DS_Joost

One day I'll fly away!
Alright, Cubase crapped out on me by resetting itself. I have just bought Komplete 12 Ultimate, which comes of course with Kontakt 6, so I needed to replace those instances in my template, as well as moving from Play 5 to 6.

I have nothing at hand at the moment, so I thought this would be the perfect time to switch over indefinitely. Been using Studio One for some years now, always loved it. This is the moment I am switching over. Time to make those instrument presets!

@jonathanwright are there some inclusions in later versions of Studio One that could help streamline this process? I am asking you because you were always the expert on this approach. I wonder if things have changed a bit since you wrote that article of yours...
 

jonathanwright

Senior Member
Alright, Cubase crapped out on me by resetting itself. I have just bought Komplete 12 Ultimate, which comes of course with Kontakt 6, so I needed to replace those instances in my template, as well as moving from Play 5 to 6.

I have nothing at hand at the moment, so I thought this would be the perfect time to switch over indefinitely. Been using Studio One for some years now, always loved it. This is the moment I am switching over. Time to make those instrument presets!

@jonathanwright are there some inclusions in later versions of Studio One that could help streamline this process? I am asking you because you were always the expert on this approach. I wonder if things have changed a bit since you wrote that article of yours...
The major change in 4.5 is the ability to select an existing preset folder when saving, which makes things a little easier.

By far the biggest time saver for me was using Keyboard Maestro (Mac) to set up a Macro which would run through large Kontakt libraries, saving and naming presets as it went.

It took a bit to set up, but saved huge amounts of time in the long run.

I’ve recently been moving my presets over to ‘track templates’. Using the import features. This could be a better option as it also saves all plugins, colour settings etc, along with the presets.
 

DS_Joost

One day I'll fly away!
Thank you for your response Jonathan! Ah yes, saving them in track templates could prove really useful. That would make it a lot easier indeed. I've worked with that approach in the past, but I never quite moved away from Cubase so I never really completed those projects. But it did work pretty well when I tried it!

It proves to be quite a complex task to move my Cubase template to Studio One's preset or track template system, but I am sure it will work out in the end, and almost as good. It just takes some thinking about organisation is all...
 

Dewdman42

Senior Member
The major change in 4.5 is the ability to select an existing preset folder when saving, which makes things a little easier.

By far the biggest time saver for me was using Keyboard Maestro (Mac) to set up a Macro which would run through large Kontakt libraries, saving and naming presets as it went.

It took a bit to set up, but saved huge amounts of time in the long run.

I’ve recently been moving my presets over to ‘track templates’. Using the import features. This could be a better option as it also saves all plugins, colour settings etc, along with the presets.
I am just getting into S1 and would love to hear more details about how you use Keyboard Maestro together with S1`s macros.
 

5Lives

Senior Member
S1 is great for many things, but orchestral work is not one of them IMO. Why try to hack around stuff when Cubase and Logic have it and much more implemented quite nicely.
 

Dewdman42

Senior Member
why not orchestral? I recently setup a 90 track orch score with VSl stuff...worked perfectly fine. Doesn't have articulation management features, but nor does DP, which many consider perfectly fine for orch use. Both of them could benefit from better articulation management, but side from that..what do you feel is difficult in S1 for orch work?

One thing I liked was that S1 supports VST3, so I could use the VST3 version of the VEP plugin for easy multiport use and it outperformed LogicPro by a little, and Cubase by a lot.
 

jonathanwright

Senior Member
Thank you for your response Jonathan! Ah yes, saving them in track templates could prove really useful. That would make it a lot easier indeed. I've worked with that approach in the past, but I never quite moved away from Cubase so I never really completed those projects. But it did work pretty well when I tried it!

It proves to be quite a complex task to move my Cubase template to Studio One's preset or track template system, but I am sure it will work out in the end, and almost as good. It just takes some thinking about organisation is all...
Track templates are working well so far. There are a couple of things to watch out for though.

At first, I tried to put all tracks (disabled) into one project, but I found when I dragged a track to the arrange window, S1 ran through a very long 'search' of the template song each time. So I broke each instrument group/library out into their own template. I placed them all in a tab in the file browser.

Dragging a track (or multiple tracks) over is now instant.



Secondly, using this method doesn't allow me to replace an existing track by dragging another on over it. That's no biggie though.
 
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jonathanwright

Senior Member
I am just getting into S1 and would love to hear more details about how you use Keyboard Maestro together with S1`s macros.
The macro I set up in Keyboard Maestro automatically runs through the process of saving a Kontakt preset as a S1 preset.

It uses a combination of clicking on 'absolute positions' (the Kontakt instance must always be in the same location on your screen) and triggering S1 key commands.

I wrap all that in a repeat loop - so I'll be asked how many presets I want to save when I run the Macro.

The trickiest part is getting the pause length right in between each step, which depends on your computer specs.

Different libraries also have wildly varying load times, so I added a second field into input how many seconds to wait until clicking on the right arrow in Kontakt to load the next preset. If I don't adjust this, some libraries don't load quickly enough and the Macro will fail.



Once set up, it can run through a huge set of presets in minutes. While I sit there with a coffee. :)
 

chocobitz825

Senior Member
Track templates are working well so far. There are a couple of things to watch out for though.

At first, I tried to put all tracks (disabled) into one project, but I found when I dragged a track to the arrange window, S1 ran through a very long 'search' through the template song each time. So I broke each instrument group/library out into their own template. I placed them all in a tab in the file browser.

Dragging a track (or multiple tracks) over is now instant.



Secondly, using this method doesn't allow me to replace an existing track by dragging another on over it. That's no biggie though.

I have a similar structure set up in my kontakt quick load menu but you have me reconsidering this method. This must be great to really sort out one's libraries.
 

jonathanwright

Senior Member
I have a similar structure set up in my kontakt quick load menu but you have me reconsidering this method. This must be great to really sort out one's libraries.
It really is a great workflow when set up.

Combined with key commands to add insert presets and the new Macro Toolbar to quickly apply effects and MIDI manipulation, I've found it the best DAW (for me) to get ideas down quickly.
 

chocobitz825

Senior Member
It really is a great workflow when set up.

Combined with key commands to add insert presets and the new Macro Toolbar to quickly apply effects and MIDI manipulation, I've found it the best DAW (for me) to get ideas down quickly.

I just started making templates as we speak lol. I agree, the macros have change so much. I set up a bunch for FX and bus creation, and just finished a macro that creates keyswitches. Once the setup is done, everything is so much faster.
 

Lukas

Keyboardist / composer
S1 is great for many things, but orchestral work is not one of them IMO. Why try to hack around stuff when Cubase and Logic have it and much more implemented quite nicely.
I honestly would like to know which functions you're talking about. I don't see many things that are missing which are essential for orchestral work (I've been doing this since Studio One 2.5) except copying / moving automation with notes and - for those who needs it - articulation management.

I have to say that I had missed many things in terms of MIDI editing, composing, orchestral arrangement... until version 4.0 came out.

- NKS or NI Komplete Kontrol Mk2 integration/compatibility
NKS is something a plugin has to support...not the DAW. NI Kontrol MK2 -> NI decided not to support MCU with the MKII series. Fortunately they already announced a firmware update which will re-add it so Studio One transport control should be possible with the new update.
 
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jbuhler

Senior Member
I have to say that I had missed many things in terms of MIDI editing, composing, orchestral arrangement... until version 4.0 came out.
I still find much of the midi editing kludgy compared to Logic. (I've also been using S1 since version 2.5.) I don't like the fact that I can only have one piano roll editor open, for instance. (On the other hand, I don't like that you can only have one automation window open in piano roll on Logic.) The manual is also not very helpful, even by the rather low standards of software manuals, and it is harder to find help videos and other secondary support services for S1 than for Logic or Cubase.

I seem to be able to work with higher track counts of VIs in version 4 compared to previous versions.

The thing that keeps me coming back to S1 is the way the arranger track and the scratch pad work together. I find it much easier to work out complex structures in S1.
 

chocobitz825

Senior Member
I still find much of the midi editing kludgy compared to Logic. (I've also been using S1 since version 2.5.) I don't like the fact that I can only have one piano roll editor open, for instance. (On the other hand, I don't like that you can only have one automation window open in piano roll on Logic.) The manual is also not very helpful, even by the rather low standards of software manuals, and it is harder to find help videos and other secondary support services for S1 than for Logic or Cubase.

I seem to be able to work with higher track counts of VIs in version 4 compared to previous versions.

The thing that keeps me coming back to S1 is the way the arranger track and the scratch pad work together. I find it much easier to work out complex structures in S1.
Studio one expert on YouTube and a studio one course from groove3.com helped me figure out a lot of stuff. I used to really love logic, but studio one is so much better now that I have my preferred workflow. I suppose the single editor window could be annoying, but I’ve found it unecessary since you can view other track’s midi notes in the background of the single editor
 

chocobitz825

Senior Member
I still find much of the midi editing kludgy compared to Logic. (I've also been using S1 since version 2.5.) I don't like the fact that I can only have one piano roll editor open, for instance. (On the other hand, I don't like that you can only have one automation window open in piano roll on Logic.) The manual is also not very helpful, even by the rather low standards of software manuals, and it is harder to find help videos and other secondary support services for S1 than for Logic or Cubase.

I seem to be able to work with higher track counts of VIs in version 4 compared to previous versions.

The thing that keeps me coming back to S1 is the way the arranger track and the scratch pad work together. I find it much easier to work out complex structures in S1.
Just curious. I've heard a lot of users reference only having one single editor window as a problem. is this multi track view feature insufficient? (pictured below)

 

jbuhler

Senior Member
Studio one expert on YouTube and a studio one course from groove3.com helped me figure out a lot of stuff. I used to really love logic, but studio one is so much better now that I have my preferred workflow. I suppose the single editor window could be annoying, but I’ve found it unecessary since you can view other track’s midi notes in the background of the single editor
I do like that you can view the other tracks so easily but there are times when I want to see if things line up and if they are superimposed on top of one another you can't always do it very well. Like today I was trying to break a string ensemble track out into divisi string parts (which due to voice crossings didn't allow for exploding the parts onto separate tracks in an automated way), and it would have been a lot simpler to do in Logic, where I could have had another piano roll or score view window open.

It's also a bit embarrassing to admit, given that I've been using the program on and off for many years now, but I also haven't yet figured out the trick of making sure the track I want to be editing is actually active in the music editor. You'd think it's the one whose notes are most prominently colored in the piano roll, but, alas, that is not always a reliable guide... Nor is it necessarily the instrument indicated on the piano roll, nor even the instrument you selected in the main window if you've done some shuffling around since you last visited that window. The little blue pencil on the track list in the music editor I think tells us that it is available for editing, but if you have more than one instrument marked thus, I'm never sure what will happen. And what the automation applies to is not always clear either (unless you keep your instruments distinctly colored).
 

Lukas

Keyboardist / composer
It's also a bit embarrassing to admit, given that I've been using the program on and off for many years now, but I also haven't yet figured out the trick of making sure the track I want to be editing is actually active in the music editor. You'd think it's the one whose notes are most prominently colored in the piano roll, but, alas, that is not always a reliable guide... Nor is it necessarily the instrument indicated on the piano roll, nor even the instrument you selected in the main window if you've done some shuffling around since you last visited that window. The little blue pencil on the track list in the music editor I think tells us that it is available for editing, but if you have more than one instrument marked thus, I'm never sure what will happen. And what the automation applies to is not always clear either (unless you keep your instruments distinctly colored).
This behaviour used to be quite confusing before 4.0, I agree. That's why these things have been overhauled so I'd recommend to take another look at it. In my opinion it's become much clearer now. If you click one note its instrument becomes "active" and you can be sure to see its automation below. Also you can set your note colors to "Part" which will use the part colors but indicate the velocity by brightness. The active instrument/track will be also selected in the track list on the left.
 
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jbuhler

Senior Member
This behaviour used to be quite confusing before 4.0, I agree. That's why these things have been overhauled so you should take another look at it. In my opininion it's much clearer now. If you click one note its instrument becomes "active" and you can be sure to see its automation below. Also you can set your note colors to "Part" which will use the part colors but indicate the velocity by brightness.
Yes, I already do this, but S1 doesn't have a large number of colors to begin with and many of the colors it has are quite close in hue. So if you are working with a lot of tracks, you can easily run out of distinguishable colors. Logic has a similar issue. Not sure why the DAW makers are so stingy on the color choices...
 
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