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Plugin for protecting my precious ears...

lokotus

Member
Had this problem in the past:

I have solved it for my situation: My Horror Settings were: ASio Guard Enabled in "High" Setting was causing this killing nosie blast / burst effect in Cub 10 Win 10 64bit. TUrning Asio Gard off for VEP has solved it. Also one could try out Asio guard Medium setting but still, be carefull. (I also used maximum buffer setting 4, but I think that doesn´t have anything to do with it)

I highly recommand the free plugin Ice9 on the master bus when working with VEP or noise blast, burst from other plugin, which sometimes happens. https://www.pluginboutiq...ols/72-Utility/2759-Ice9

It will mute the signal over a given threshold, which is much better than using a limiter.

If you want to test this bug on your system, replicate my horror settings on a big cpu taxing project, turn the monitors levels way down and don´t use any headphones + use Ice9 on the master bus. When you toggle between any cubase internal VI instrument or channels and VEP Channels you might be able to reproduce this.

Thanks, Cheers, lokotus
 

clisma

Active Member
Also Ice9 here used to safeguard against Acustica Audio plugins.
Care to elaborate? I’ve recently had a wicked burst of 40+ dBs with no explanation (luckily the built-in limiters in my speakers did their job). I use several Acustica plugs...
 

ceemusic

Active Member
This issue was fixed about 2 years ago, if you hit them too hard you'd get an excruciating loud burst of noise. It would typically happen when you'd try driving a pre-amp like h/w.
Still AA's plugins need to be gain staged or you'll get chirps, weird noise, artifacts. I still use ice9 because AA's in combo with other plugins( like PA's) can still go haywire every so often & blow up.
 

Guy Rowland

Senior Member
I guess I don't get the prompt. You want a limiter but instead of reducing the signal, it just shuts off your speakers?

That's either annoying: set at a reasonable level, your speakers cut out every time you were going to peak. Or useless: you set a truly disastrous level you more rarely reach, then +39dB will still destroy your ears but +40dB gets clamped.

And if they do either 'softly,' as in reducing level via an unobtrusive ramp, we're just back at a limiter.
I found a good level on SigMod easily enough that only very rarely triggers in real life - very occasionally when patch-surfing Omni it goes, but I’m pretty glad there actually - but always on a true very loud event. Think it was +8 in my case. And it’s dead easy to reset, I have the settings so it has a pop up window, you can’t miss it, one click to reset.

On VEP, I’m 95% sure my issues were connected to additional audio outs from a disabled plugin that enables. They did try a fix in 6 which I think improved how often it triggered, but certainly didn’t eliminate it completely. Although I haven’t had it yet in 7 (that other person on the VSL forums is me, MrLinissi), I’m not convinced that it won’t happen again, so very happy for SigMod to remain in circuit forevermore.
 
OP
MrLinssi

MrLinssi

A glorified bedroom musician.
I got my hands on the Ice9, but unfortunately it refused to work properly. Had to buy SigMod, but what the hell, I'll happily spend a little money if it can save my ears. Thanks for the suggestion, @JEPA
 

rudi

Member
In reaper you can easily set that up as a function of the DAW with your own threshold. Has helped me multiple times. You should request it as a feature for the DAW you are using. I think it's irresponsible not to offer such relatively simple to implement health safety features.
How do you set that up in Reaper? It sounds like a useful idea :)
 

ProtectedRights

Active Member
Setup a limiter on your output bus with a threshold at 0dB.

If a signal limited to 0dB is painful, your speakers are too loud. Calibrate.
That's not all true. Depends on the signal. I once demoed Fabfilter Saturn and when using Feedback it gave me a continuous screech (more ore less a square tone I guess) around 4k that propelled itself to 0dbFS within a fraction of a second. On normal monitoring loudness, a 4kHz signal at 0dbFS already hurts. So even a brickwall limiter wouldn't have me saved of this, it would have to be a specially weighted brickwall limiter.
 
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Diablo3

Active Member
I'd love to have this but on my SYSTEM, not in my DAW. I get these bursts SOMETIMES when quitting Studio one pro or Guitar Pro 7, so a plugin won't do. Now I have to remember if I quit said apps, I mute my interface first... sigh...
 

Buddy

New Member
That's not all true. Depends on the signal. I once demoed Fabfilter Saturn and when using Feedback it gave me a continuous screech (more ore less a square tone I guess) around 4k that propelled itself to 0dbFS within a fraction of a second. On normal monitoring loudness, a 4kHz signal at 0dbFS already hurts. So even a brickwall limiter wouldn't have me saved of this, it would have to be a specially weighted brickwall limiter.
You're definitely monitoring too loud if 4kHz signal at 0dBFS hurts. Pain threshold is 120dB! Most monitoring recommendations to get in the flattest part of Fletcher Munson curve are in the ballpark of 80dB. No reason to be anywhere remotely near 120dB. For the sake of your ears, turn down your monitors!
 

ProtectedRights

Active Member
You're definitely monitoring too loud if 4kHz signal at 0dBFS hurts. Pain threshold is 120dB! Most monitoring recommendations to get in the flattest part of Fletcher Munson curve are in the ballpark of 80dB. No reason to be anywhere remotely near 120dB. For the sake of your ears, turn down your monitors!
Nothing to worry, my monitoring levels are totally fine. I wasn't referring to physiological pain by the textbook definition, I was referring to an extremely unpleasant experience that I surely want to avoid. In addition these noises don't come in musical context but they can appear from out of silence all of a sudden, which adds to the shock.

Also, if I listen to quiet passages and want to tune some details, of course I turn the interfaces volume knob and temporarily raise the level. If a burst happens in such a time, it's even worse.
 
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Buddy

New Member
Nothing to worry, my monitoring levels are totally fine. I wasn't referring to physiological pain by the textbook definition, I was referring to an extremely unpleasant experience that I surely want to avoid. In addition these noises don't come in musical context but they can appear from out of silence all of a sudden, which adds to the shock.

Also, if I listen to quiet passages and want to tune some details, of course I turn the interfaces volume knob and temporarily raise the level. If a burst happens in such a time, it's even worse.
Not judging you and you're free to create your own approach, but the established way to deal with this is to adjust your mix levels. You should have a calibrated monitor volume that is safe and comfortable when limited to 0dbFS. In addition to protecting your ears from the bursts you're experiencing, your target loudness level will be familiar to you since it remains consistent.
 

ProtectedRights

Active Member
Not judging you and you're free to create your own approach, but the established way to deal with this is to adjust your mix levels. You should have a calibrated monitor volume that is safe and comfortable when limited to 0dbFS. In addition to protecting your ears from the bursts you're experiencing, your target loudness level will be familiar to you since it remains consistent.
No that's just not practical. If I have a quiet part in a piece, or a quiet part of an otherwise established mix, for which I want to adjust a detail on a solo or group track, then I don't mess with fader settings but I pull up the volume knob instead. That's just the quickest way. Otherwise I would have to remember fader settings, and I might even forget setting them back to where they were. But this is going a little of topic.

I don't have bursts all the time, I have no problem with that. I had that issue once when demoing Saturn, but I didn't buy it. All other plugins just behave.
 

Buddy

New Member
No that's just not practical.
It's certainly practical to every mix engineer that works exactly like this.

I suspect if you're having trouble with quiet passages being inaudible and frequently need to twiddle the monitor volume knob to accommodate, there's either balance issues in the mix or you're working in a room with a high noise floor.

Otherwise I would have to remember fader settings, and I might even forget setting them back to where they were.
Why would it matter if you forget where a fader was? Move the fader to where it sounds right, which is how you decided to set it at its original position in the first place. If that process takes a long time or causes concern, that might be the real issue barring a workflow that has clear advantages like consistent frame of reference for loudness and guaranteed safe levels for your hearing.
 

ProtectedRights

Active Member
Yeah well, i don't really need a discussion about it. my workflow works fine, and btw i know a few engineers touching the volume knob all the time, so no problem there. you work your way, i work my way, all fine.
 
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