What's new

PA going to Subscription too

Mark Schmieder

Senior Member
I hate to junk up a topic with a redundant answer, but yes, I did subscribe, at $149, and will make sure it doesn't lapse so that I am locked into that discount.

It was also confirmed that our perpetual licenses remain valid.
 
Again,
quickly question: Who has already subscribed? Y/N
A firm "no" from me. I will never pay for a subscription to any software.

My main reason is that I want to go on using whatever plugins I have purchased after I retire (which isn't that far off). I'll be on a limited/fixed income at that point and not able to justify paying an ongoing subscription for something if I am not making money from it, but that doesn't mean I want to have the set of musical tools I've grown accustomed to taken away from me. The whole point of "retirement" for me is to be able to make as much music as I want, with the set of tools I've assembled over a lifetime.
 

Mark Schmieder

Senior Member
I'm in the same boat. But once I found I could keep my perpetual licenses, I was in. If I can't afford the subscription once I retire, I'll just stick with the perpetual licenses, which cover a lot of ground already.
 

alanb

Senior Member
Forgive me if this has already been answered and I missed it. If you have a voucher for a discount on the subscription (I have one for $149.99), does the lower price apply to renewals after the first year or only to the first year?

PA sent out an e-mail on July 19 entitled "MEGA Bundle Subscription Info & FAQs," which included the following Q/A:



Q: Will the intro price be my price forever, or is it just valid for the 1st year after I sign up?

PA: If you sign up using your voucher above you will get your special price for as long as you don't cancel.​




This is the first time I have been tempted by the subscription model. But I added up my purchases from PA over the last 3-1/2 years and they have averaged $520 per year. At $150 a year, it seems that I could subscribe, evaluate everything when I feel like it rather than having to do so during a limited trial period, eventually buy the few I end up using frequently, and break even or come out slightly ahead.
Yeah, unless you lose your job, or your rent triples, or you get hit by a bus, or discover that you have cancer or some other long-term medical condition that insurance doesn't quite cover, or any of a million other unexpected contingencies arise which kill your cashflow, and then suddenly you realize that you are not only able to afford your annual subscription renewals, but that you can no longer make full and proper use of your own creations that were made with the plugins to which you are no longer licensed to use.

This would be doubly stupid if reworking/revising/repurposing these personal creations, were you able to work them, would have been your path to financial recovery.....

I love PA, and have nearly all of their plugins, but I wrote them to say that I'll drop them as fast as I dropped Adobe (hellooooooooooooooo, Blackmagicdesign!!) if they ever switch to a subscription-only model.

Maintaining both models without forcing a noticeable increase in the price points for permanent licenses (like EastWest currently seems to be doing) is fine . . .

. . . but no one who has ever fallen on hard financial times would in their right mind subject him- or herself to such a risk.

And anyone who has seriously considered that their personal creations won't be entirely theirs anymore — and that they will lose exclusive control over the use and exploitation of 'their' personal creations, if subscription-based tools were used in the creation process — would recognize immediately the inherent foolishness of relinquishing the perpetual right to use the tools that they find useful, and their creations that were made using those tools.....

Er . . . just sayin'................................
 

chocobitz825

Senior Member
PA sent out an e-mail on July 19 entitled "MEGA Bundle Subscription Info & FAQs," which included the following Q/A:



Q: Will the intro price be my price forever, or is it just valid for the 1st year after I sign up?

PA: If you sign up using your voucher above you will get your special price for as long as you don't cancel.​






Yeah, unless you lose your job, or your rent triples, or you get hit by a bus, or discover that you have cancer or some other long-term medical condition that insurance doesn't quite cover, or any of a million other unexpected contingencies arise which kill your cashflow, and then suddenly you realize that you are not only able to afford your annual subscription renewals, but that you can no longer make full and proper use of your own creations that were made with the plugins to which you are no longer licensed to use.

This would be doubly stupid if reworking/revising/repurposing these personal creations, were you able to work them, would have been your path to financial recovery.....

I love PA, and have nearly all of their plugins, but I wrote them to say that I'll drop them as fast as I dropped Adobe (hellooooooooooooooo, Blackmagicdesign!!) if they ever switch to a subscription-only model.

Maintaining both models without forcing a noticeable increase in the price points for permanent licenses (like EastWest currently seems to be doing) is fine . . .

. . . but no one who has ever fallen on hard financial times would in their right mind subject him- or herself to such a risk.

And anyone who has seriously considered that their personal creations won't be entirely theirs anymore — and that they will lose exclusive control over the use and exploitation of 'their' personal creations, if subscription-based tools were used in the creation process — would recognize immediately the inherent foolishness of relinquishing the perpetual right to use the tools that they find useful, and their creations that were made using those tools.....

Er . . . just sayin'................................
Did daws remove the ability to bounce tracks?

Those are valid doomsday scenarios, but if your OS puts old plugins out of compatibility, you’re in the same boat. If your computer dies, same situation. If your drive fails, same situation. If you’re responsible about your business you’d take necessary precautions to protect yourself. A subscription comes with some risk, but if you’ve backed up your files, you’ll have those to re use and if you need to adjust the song you use the plugins you have.

I understand the reluctance, but I can’t foresee subscription being this make or break scenario. Your inability to apply a few reverb or compressors is suddenly the destruction of the whole track? You can’t substitute them with what you already have? You didn’t save any stems of the song?
This one song will suddenly be the ticket to curing your illness, getting your jobs back, and fixing your broken bones? It just seems like a pretty outrageous hypothetical situation.

Whatever the situation is, we should be prepared for the worst. A subscription offers as much potential as it does risk, but that’s the same with every part of our business.
 

JEPA

Senior Member
@rrichard63 get me thinking of doing it, in a positive way. If you plan some aims / objectives in a year, to deliver some good music for specific targets, €149-€199 a year can't be wrong. If one thinks about these gigs are going to catapult your business further...
 

chocobitz825

Senior Member
@rrichard63 get me thinking of doing it, in a positive way. If you plan some aims / objectives in a year, to deliver some good music for specific targets, €149-€199 a year can't be wrong. If one thinks about these gigs are going to catapult your business further...
If I could state one major benefit. A lot of plugins you find on UAD are also available with Plugin Alliance, but with no need for physical hardware and DSP management.
 

dzilizzi

I just hang around pretending I know something
If I could state one major benefit. A lot of plugins you find on UAD are also available with Plugin Alliance, but with no need for physical hardware and DSP management.
Except I've got most of the ones I am interested in and, I think, all of the UA ones. Truthfully, my PA purchases are usually just because it will be somewhere between $4 and $20 dollars with the voucher. I rarely remember to use them.
 

alanb

Senior Member
Those are valid doomsday scenarios,
Look, I don't know you. Maybe you are too young to understand how your body/health will change in a few years, or decades, and how your job security could very easily evaporate with barely a moment's notice . . . Perhaps you and all who sail with you lead charmed lives and will never know what it's like to struggle financially, but I know WAY TOO MANY people for whom these scenarios are the facts of their daily lives, not bullshit 'doomsday scenarios'.


but if your OS puts old plugins out of compatibility, you’re in the same boat.
That's only a Macpeople problem, right? Thankfully, I've never had to deal with that..... :cool:


If your computer dies, same situation. If your drive fails, same situation. If you’re responsible about your business you’d take necessary precautions to protect yourself. A subscription comes with some risk, but if you’ve backed up your files, you’ll have those to re use and if you need to adjust the song you use the plugins you have.
No, that's pretty appleses-to-orangesesy.

Sure, if you've bounced/printed every track to .wavs (or .aiffs or whathaveyou), then you'll (probably)* be able to make whatever use you can of the bounced/printed track but your exploitation opportunities will be extremely limited vis-à-vis yourself/your original client (an ACID Pro-based remix, maybe?), and probably non-existent if the new project is for a different client.

And if your original client comes back, the day after your subscription lapses and asks for "just a little tweak, I don't like this one bit here," you'll be out of luck in addition to being out of cash.

And if a new client comes along and says "I want my guitar/drums/hand-cupped armpit/'Mal-de-l’air-bag horns' to sound just like that track you did for so-and-so last year," your backed-up files won't do much for ya.

And your point completely ignores the overarching-but-everpresent issues of ownership and control that should be the main focus of any subscription discussion

* [Just wait and see how subscription rules will become increasingly stringent and permissible usage scenarios will become fewer and more restricted, as more of the major devs switch to subscription-only models, and more customers allow themselves to become tethered to the whims and demands of the companies' bean-counters and counsel. Software devs behaving like telcos... GET WOKE — it could happen in your lifetime, people (cue tritone cluster on theremin quartet)].


Your inability to apply a few reverb or compressors is suddenly the destruction of the whole track?
Sometimes, absolutely yes.


Bonham's massive drum intro to When the Levee Breaks would never have become the eternal benchmark of rock drum heaviness that it is, were it not for that Binson Echorec (and, of course, Andy Johns' brilliant triangulation) (and, well... Bonham) (but the point stands).

And if you tried slapping some additional reverb or compression or delay to that recording (copyright infringement issues aside), it'd probably end up sounding like dreck.

Oh, and how some of the folks around here just loooooove libs with 'baked-in' reverb . . . 'cause it's so easy to add more reverb on top and have it sound great!!! :confused: So you'll have to de-verb and un-compress the tracks (with what plugins?).

Anyway, that's not as important as the fact that you'll be stuck with a fixed track or group of stems from which you won't be able to squeeze out much in the way of new material.

And that's not as important as the slightly more abstract (but, I think, much more salient) point that you'll be relinquishing a life in which you own stuff and can control what happens to stuff, and trading it in for a life in which you don't own stuff and can't control what happens to stuff (other folks' stuff, and sometimes your own) anymore.

You can’t substitute them with what you already have?
#1: It's rarely about what *I* can do . . . it's usually about what the client wants.

#2: You can't just "substitute" an effect on a printed track — you're stuck with what you have.

#3: sometimes the reason why I bought instrument/effect 'x' is precisely because of its unique characteristics.


This one song will suddenly be the ticket to curing your illness, getting your jobs back, and fixing your broken bones? It just seems like a pretty outrageous hypothetical situation.
Now here's where you've got my position POWER-LEGATO-STRENGTH-wrong.

It's not about just one song. It's about each and every potential song that you'll no longer be able to create, or produce, or post-produce, because you've lost access to your toolset, or a large part of it.

It's also about your reduced (if not eliminated) ability to make changes to, or derivative works from, each and every song that you've ever done, in which landing "the right sound" came from finding the right setting on the right plugin . . . that you can no longer use.

And it's about losing control over a presumably-important part of your life. Which may not matter to you (it doesn't seem to for many, these days), but it damn well should. I'm just looking out for you, man, srsly.......

This subscription model crap first came to my attention with Microsoft Office. If your work involves any form of writing, and you suddenly lost your access to Word and could no longer print or edit and resave ANHYTHING YOU'VE EVER WRITTEN BEFORE, then you'd be 'well and truly fucked,' as we say back home.*

*(Can I use that word here? If not, can I substitute 'rogered', as they say in other folks' homes, thousands of miles away? There're probably not enough Blackadder fans around who know what it really means, so it might escape the bad-word censor list.....???)


Whatever the situation is, we should be prepared for the worst. A subscription offers as much potential as it does risk, but that’s the same with every part of our business.
This is kind of, pretty much, the opposite of true.

The risk is far greater because, under a subscription model, you have no property rights in the tools of your trade (and/or your life) . . . and your legal rights in your own creations are limited compared to what they would be if you own all of your tools outright.

And even if you're certain-beyond-all-cavil that you'd never fall on such hard times that you'll have to stop paying for your subscription, you could still lose your right to use some of those tools because of a clash-of-the-titans licensing dispute. There is nothing outrageous or unbelievable bout that scenario. Ain't that right, Creative Cloud users? Or just plain folks who bought, er . . . LICENSED 1984 or Animal Farm for their Kindle, back in '09?
 
Last edited:

chocobitz825

Senior Member
Look, I don't know you. Maybe you are too young to understand how your body/health will change in a few years, or decades, and how your job security could very easily evaporate with barely a moment's notice . . . Perhaps you and all who sail with you lead charmed lives and will never know what it's like to struggle financially, but I know WAY TOO MANY people for whom these scenarios are the facts of their daily lives, not bullshit 'doomsday scenarios'.




That's only a Macpeople problem, right? Thankfully, I've never had to deal with that..... :cool:




No, that's pretty appleses-to-orangesesy.

Sure, if you've bounced/printed every track to .wavs (or .aiffs or whathaveyou), then you'll (probably)* be able to make whatever use you can of the bounced/printed track but your exploitation opportunities will be extremely limited vis-à-vis yourself/your original client (an ACID Pro-based remix, maybe?), and probably non-existent if the new project is for a different client.

And if your original client comes back, the day after your subscription lapses and asks for "just a little tweak, I don't like this one bit here," you'll be out of luck in addition to being out of cash.

And if a new client comes along and says "I want my guitar/drums/hand-cupped armpit/'Mal-de-l’air-bag horns' to sound just like that track you did for so-and-so last year," your backed-up files won't do much for ya.

And your point completely ignores the overarching-but-everpresent issues of ownership and control that should be the main focus of any subscription discussion

* [Just wait and see how subscription rules will become increasingly stringent and permissible usage scenarios will become fewer and more restricted, as more of the major devs switch to subscription-only models, and more customers allow themselves to become tethered to the whims and demands of the companies' bean-counters and counsel. Software devs behaving like telcos... GET WOKE — it could happen in your lifetime, people (cue tritone cluster on theremin quartet)].




Sometimes, absolutely yes.


Bonham's massive drum intro to When the Levee Breaks would never have become the eternal benchmark of rock drum heaviness that it is, were it not for that Binson Echorec (and, of course, Andy Johns' brilliant triangulation) (and, well... Bonham) (but the point stands).

And if you tried slapping some additional reverb or compression or delay to that recording (copyright infringement issues aside), it'd probably end up sounding like dreck.

Oh, and how some of the folks around here just loooooove libs with 'baked-in' reverb . . . 'cause it's so easy to add more reverb on top and have it sound great!!! :confused: So you'll have to de-verb and un-compress the tracks (with what plugins?).

Anyway, that's not as important as the fact that you'll be stuck with a fixed track or group of stems from which you won't be able to squeeze out much in the way of new material.

And that's not as important as the slightly more abstract (but, I think, much more salient) point that you'll be relinquishing a life in which you own stuff and can control what happens to stuff, and trading it in for a life in which you don't own stuff and can't control what happens to stuff (other folks' stuff, and sometimes your own) anymore.



#1: It's rarely about what *I* can do . . . it's usually about what the client wants.

#2: You can't just "substitute" an effect on a printed track — you're stuck with what you have.

#3: sometimes the reason why I bought instrument/effect 'x' is precisely because of its unique characteristics.




Now here's where you've got my position POWER-LEGATO-STRENGTH-wrong.

It's not about just one song. It's about each and every potential song that you'll no longer be able to create, or produce, or post-produce, because you've lost access to your toolset, or a large part of it.

It's also about your reduced (if not eliminated) ability to make changes to, or derivative works from, each and every song that you've ever done, in which landing "the right sound" came from finding the right setting on the right plugin . . . that you can no longer use.

And it's about losing control over a presumably-important part of your life. Which may not matter to you (it doesn't seem to for many, these days), but it damn well should. I'm just looking out for you, man, srsly.......

This subscription model crap first came to my attention with Microsoft Office. If your work involves any form of writing, and you suddenly lost your access to Word and could no longer print or edit and resave ANHYTHING YOU'VE EVER WRITTEN BEFORE, then you'd be 'well and truly fucked,' as we say back home.*

*(Can I use that word here? If not, can I substitute 'rogered', as they say in other folks' homes, thousands of miles away? There're probably not enough Blackadder fans around who know what it really means, so it might escape the bad-word censor list.....???)




This is kind of, pretty much, the opposite of true.

The risk is far greater because, under a subscription model, you have no property rights in the tools of your trade (and/or your life) . . . and your legal rights in your own creations are limited compared to what they would be if you own all of your tools outright.

And even if you're certain-beyond-all-cavil that you'd never fall on such hard times that you'll have to stop paying for your subscription, you could still lose your right to use some of those tools because of a clash-of-the-titans licensing dispute. There is nothing outrageous or unbelievable bout that scenario. Ain't that right, Creative Cloud users? Or just plain folks who bought, er . . . LICENSED 1984 or Animal Farm for their Kindle, back in '09?
Your situation still creates a lot of hyperbole without acknowledging the reality. Everyone here speaking out against the concept of subscriptions and not the reality of PA’s subscription model. You own every license you already bought. You can buy any product you like. If you like the subscription model and it works, and you want to keep using it while purchasing none of the plugins, you can. If you try it and find you only really use 20 of the plugins, you can still buy those plugins and get off of the subscription. In your scenario you make it sound as if you’ve lost the freedom to purchase. Hell I’ve been on slates subscription and recently concluded I don’t need it. So I’ll buy the few things I liked, and move on.

Yes, some people have shitty subscription models, office being one of them. adobe being another. So you go with another product and vote with your wallet. A right you’re free to express here as well, but at least be fair and acknowledge that PA’s subscription does not suddenly lock you out from owning products, or lock your out of products you already own.

There are countless ways in which life and business can fuck us all. I don’t dispute that. What I disagree with is this scenario in which you have it all or nothing at all. You risk loss to your plugins for numerous reasons all the time. Your system, your os, the developer no longer updating it, etc etc. that’s why at the very least you would want bounced stems so you have something of your original idea, whilst also keeping your project file so you can tweak it down the line. you have no guarantees that your projects will always be safe. Hell some daws drop compatibility for projects that are too old. So again, if you reach this cluster fuck situation, subscriptions are not the only thing that might ruin your day. Some foresight and preparation would at least help ease some of that.

Also stop acting like us whippersnappers are messing up the business for everyone. I’m from a generation that has a hard time getting into the game. We’re lucky if we even get to the point of being stuck in a situation of falling out of it. I’m lucky to be working. I wish I could say the same for my peers carrying crippling debt and a bum economy (music or otherwise). This model is a change that came about out of necessity and preference. Necessity for developers trying to control pirating, and maintain their operational and growth costs. This is change for a market that has grown with technology. It’s also a market that has to exist in a time when ownership is not for everyone precisely because of poor economic situations. This is a market where more people are freelance and small businesses trying to compete with media giants. You see subscriptions ruining business where others see it helping their business grow. Just like you know people who have had life changes that threaten their income, I know a bunch of people who wish they had access to better gear to help kickstart their creativity and businesses. We’re on different sides of the fence here, but I’m not calling you and those like you fools for wanting to opt out. Stop talking down to those of us who prefer this model.
 

JEPA

Senior Member
Your situation still creates a lot of hyperbole without acknowledging the reality. Everyone here speaking out against the concept of subscriptions and not the reality of PA’s subscription model. You own every license you already bought. You can buy any product you like. If you like the subscription model and it works, and you want to keep using it while purchasing none of the plugins, you can. If you try it and find you only really use 20 of the plugins, you can still buy those plugins and get off of the subscription. In your scenario you make it sound as if you’ve lost the freedom to purchase. Hell I’ve been on slates subscription and recently concluded I don’t need it. So I’ll buy the few things I liked, and move on.

Yes, some people have shitty subscription models, office being one of them. adobe being another. So you go with another product and vote with your wallet. A right you’re free to express here as well, but at least be fair and acknowledge that PA’s subscription does not suddenly lock you out from owning products, or lock your out of products you already own.

There are countless ways in which life and business can fuck us all. I don’t dispute that. What I disagree with is this scenario in which you have it all or nothing at all. You risk loss to your plugins for numerous reasons all the time. Your system, your os, the developer no longer updating it, etc etc. that’s why at the very least you would want bounced stems so you have something of your original idea, whilst also keeping your project file so you can tweak it down the line. you have no guarantees that your projects will always be safe. Hell some daws drop compatibility for projects that are too old. So again, if you reach this cluster fuck situation, subscriptions are not the only thing that might ruin your day. Some foresight and preparation would at least help ease some of that.

Also stop acting like us whippersnappers are messing up the business for everyone. I’m from a generation that has a hard time getting into the game. We’re lucky if we even get to the point of being stuck in a situation of falling out of it. I’m lucky to be working. I wish I could say the same for my peers carrying crippling debt and a bum economy (music or otherwise). This model is a change that came about out of necessity and preference. Necessity for developers trying to control pirating, and maintain their operational and growth costs. This is change for a market that has grown with technology. It’s also a market that has to exist in a time when ownership is not for everyone precisely because of poor economic situations. This is a market where more people are freelance and small businesses trying to compete with media giants. You see subscriptions ruining business where others see it helping their business grow. Just like you know people who have had life changes that threaten their income, I know a bunch of people who wish they had access to better gear to help kickstart their creativity and businesses. We’re on different sides of the fence here, but I’m not calling you and those like you fools for wanting to opt out. Stop talking down to those of us who prefer this model.
Although my natural instinct and nature don't want subscriptions but a sense of control and ownership, you've made very good points here in the argumentation. I can understand for example the NEED of a system for developers to control piracy, subscription shines to be actually the better one. That's maybe why Adobe got this system too. The only complaint I see in subscription models is the lac of ownership possibilities if it is the case and the abuse procedures of some companies. I like rent to own, but now with this PA offer I could imagine (I own some of their plugins) to pay 1 year subscription and see how it evolves during the year, if I could inject some improvement into my business. I am producing frequently, so I could see here a good opportunity, but it itches to know if one stops to subscribe, what happens to the projects? I would subscribe 1 year and paying attention to buy some more PA plugins if they still go low on BF and sales... thinking, thinking
 

chocobitz825

Senior Member
Although my natural instinct and nature don't want subscriptions but a sense of control and ownership, you've made very good points here in the argumentation. I can understand for example the NEED of a system for developers to control piracy, subscription shines to be actually the better one. That's maybe why Adobe got this system too. The only complaint I see in subscription models is the lac of ownership possibilities if it is the case and the abuse procedures of some companies. I like rent to own, but now with this PA offer I could imagine (I own some of their plugins) to pay 1 year subscription and see how it evolves during the year, if I could inject some improvement into my business. I am producing frequently, so I could see here a good opportunity, but it itches to know if one stops to subscribe, what happens to the projects? I would subscribe 1 year and paying attention to buy some more PA plugins if they still go low on BF and sales... thinking, thinking
It’s a completely legitimate concern to wonder what happens to projects you’ve done over the year. Is it likely that you’d throw in 1 of each of the 100+ plugins into your projects, or is it more likely that by the time you end your subscription you know mostly what you’ve used and buy or replace those (with maybe a few surprises where you used something only a handful of times). Either way, while it does take work to come off of a subscription, all of these things can more or less be replicated, short of some of the more unique modulation plugins.

In my very real experience right now, I just stopped my east west subscription and freed up like 2TB from my drive by deleting all the libraries. Even the ones I own. (They’re all backed up on the drive east west sent me anyway) some of my old unused projects have east west layered in, and I’ll have to replace them, but the reason I ended the subscription was that I really almost never use their libraries so the number of projects impacted is also small. I’ll have the same issue if I end slate because many projects used their tape machine, so I’ll likely buy the tape machine to save trouble...apparently, I like it enough to put it in multiple projects.

I admit there is no painless solution and indeed if they take the productivity application model of totally locking you out of accessibility to their products without a subscription we’ll have a different conversation that can likely be solved by a mass exodus from their service. For now, if your budget allows, consider giving it a try. You might be surprised.

While it might sound like my experience with east west and slate were failures, I feel I got my money’s worth. There’s no question in my mind about their services. I know I might buy pop brass from east west because I liked it before I ended my subscription, but I hate the PLAY engine. slates plugins are really good, but just not my go-to. They recently added kilohearts and ANA 2 which I REALLY LIKE, so I know I’m buying those.
I got to really dig in and see what I liked and didn’t like, and got to do more than 14-day trial. I lived with the service for about a year and came to some solid conclusions. Worth it to me.
 

Henu

Senior Member
A lot of worst possible scenarios.
Many things in your post are technically implying that we cannot reproduce the mix again if we'd need to do it without certain plugins. While this holds true for the more obscure enhancers/ modulator plugins, most of the stuff we do in the mix can be reproduced to the the extent where the client doesn't really notice any difference. Which is what we aim for anyway.

Concerning PA: If I loose my Bx_Townhouse compressor, I'm pretty sure that e.g. Slate's FG-Grey can be used instead, or I can dial up some low end from another EQ than Dangerous as long as I just get the curves about right. Sure, it's annoying and takes some time. And it's up to you to judge should that be done for compensation or for free. If I decide to update half of my plugins or cancel that subscription as soon as I have sent the last files to the client, the joke's on me on that one.

The more time goes between the first "final" delivery and the rework, the more reasonable it is to ask for a compensation and most of all- the more reasonable it is to understand that we're not going to be able to get that 2 year old project open with the exactly same setup again without any errors about missing plugins. We update, change and modify a lot of our workflow (starting from upgrading a DAW version) during the years and it would be sheer madness to think that the backup we make will actually open up just like it opened in 2016 when we did the backup- unless we're gonna keep all plugin versions installed on our DAWs since that 2016....which is, to put it mildly, asking for some serious trouble.
 

JEPA

Senior Member
Interesting discussion. I would put a little grain of salt:

How old are your latest oldest opened project? Did it stand to the actual DAW & plugins?

My answer: I lately opened a project from 2015-2016, it was in ProTools, which I don't own any more (the studio owned it), I had to open it into Mixbus v4 (it has a beta for Protools projects) and I could remix newly this song on Logic! I have also projects in Cubase from 2012.... ehem...
 
Last edited:
Top Bottom