What's new

Ownership of the staffpad company

dcoscina

Senior Member
I agree that that Notion became increasingly messy as they added features, but your argument seems to be: Notion did things poorly therefore StaffPad must also do things poorly.

I will admit that StaffPad's current menu layout doesn't instill a lot of confidence. It is not a very judicious use of space. The main editing menu has Layers taking up prime real estate. This is a feature that I some times use, but it should hardly be on the main menu. Also on this menu are the Reader and the Metronome. Really? WTF? Why do I need a metronome in an app that has no performance input? And the Reader? Who ever uses this? It is a cool idea, but what are the chances that you will ever be in a rehearsal with an orchestra outfitted with tablets? And yet it is on the main editing menu. Meanwhile, one of the most used features, undo/redo, is on another menu so that you are constantly having to switch to that menu. DWH doesn't use this feature, so he could care less. He uses press/swipe to undo. And this is really cool when it works, but a lot of times it doesn't. Instead of undoing what you've just done, it scrolls to the end of the score.

After seeing Martin Keary's video about the redesign of Musescore, I had hoped that his insight would be applied to the StaffPad interface, which sorely needs a new set of eyes.
I worked in MuseScore last night and it was stupid easy to get around on. I had to do some examples of Goldsmith’s themes from Legend for an upcoming podcast and i loved the camera capture option to grab those sections and copy to a Google document. Anytime I didn’t know what to do, I looked it up and found the answer in record time. Unlike Dorico which has some brutal long explanations.

I’m actually very optimistic about Musescore. If they can figure out a way to add SP playback and cross compatibility with the mobile app version this might be a killer combo.
 

wcreed51

Senior Member
But if audio transcription depends on the M1 chip, how could that have been planned from the beginning? If he means audio tracks, why would you need a metronome for that?
 

muratkayi

Member
But if audio transcription depends on the M1 chip, how could that have been planned from the beginning? If he means audio tracks, why would you need a metronome for that?
audio "support" was planned from the beginning. I think the transcription thing was born later on. And from what I read it does not depend on the M1 if you do not need it to be real-time. If you do need it real-time it says more powerful devices "like the M1".
Here is the link, it's an interesting read

as concerns metronomes for audio tracks I envision this:
your cue is a mess of tempo fluctuations and odd meters to make what once was a beautiful melody fit into the latest of ca. 30 changes the director made to the scene in question, even though he only two days ago swore a terrible oath that the file finalfinal23.mov will not be changed again. You receive finalfinal24.mov and you know only a tibetan bagpipe made from dried goat udder can unify the bits and pieces and save the day. Spitfire have announced a sampled library to that effect for later that year, but you can't wait. In the twilight of a tajikian restaurant money and instrument change hands. You fire up Staffpad and find the metronome conveniently and prominently shoved into your face and it guides you through the recording session like a beacon over troubled water.
Staffpad audio support saved the day and you light a candle for either MuseGroup or David, depending on your confession.
 

Jett Hitt

Senior Member
I worked in MuseScore last night and it was stupid easy to get around on. I had to do some examples of Goldsmith’s themes from Legend for an upcoming podcast and i loved the camera capture option to grab those sections and copy to a Google document. Anytime I didn’t know what to do, I looked it up and found the answer in record time. Unlike Dorico which has some brutal long explanations.

I’m actually very optimistic about Musescore. If they can figure out a way to add SP playback and cross compatibility with the mobile app version this might be a killer combo.
My interaction with Musescore has been very limited. I have used Finale for so long that I can do it in my sleep, so I have little incentive to use Musescore--not yet anyway. As you know, however, I did download it and play with it. The simplicity of it was a breath of fresh air. By contrast, Dorico blew my mind. Some things were better, but mostly I found it to be horrifically complex. This is Spreadberry's vision of the future? Heaven help us.

I wonder if these people ever talk to composers? StaffPad at least has the decided advantage of DWH being a composer. As a result of this, you instantly get 80% of what you need as a composer right upfront. Most notably, you get notation with fantastic playback. I may appear to be terribly critical of StaffPad, but I adore it and use it every day. As a result of this, I intimately understand its flaws.
 

dcoscina

Senior Member
My interaction with Musescore has been very limited. I have used Finale for so long that I can do it in my sleep, so I have little incentive to use Musescore--not yet anyway. As you know, however, I did download it and play with it. The simplicity of it was a breath of fresh air. By contrast, Dorico blew my mind. Some things were better, but mostly I found it to be horrifically complex. This is Spreadberry's vision of the future? Heaven help us.

I wonder if these people ever talk to composers? StaffPad at least has the decided advantage of DWH being a composer. As a result of this, you instantly get 80% of what you need as a composer right upfront. Most notably, you get notation with fantastic playback. I may appear to be terribly critical of StaffPad, but I adore it and use it every day. As a result of this, I intimately understand its flaws.
I think with Keavy at the helm of MuseScore, it's likely to be developed into a very good composing app. Dorico is quite lovely in many ways but as Keary explains in his Tanticrul YT persona, it forces the composer to work the way IT wants you to, rather than Sibelius which gets out of your way most of the time. Keary is a composer so I think he's bringing that to the table insofar as development of MuseScore.

I like Dorico, don't get me wrong. I think it's cool and does some things waaaaay better than Sibelius. but for simple things, it's overly complex when it doesn't have to be. Dorico seems like it wants to bring in playback strengths from Cubase so it too can be everything to everyone. I still find this a fatal flaw in their ideology. This seems to have befallen all of the notation app developers...
 

Jett Hitt

Senior Member
I think with Keavy at the helm of MuseScore, it's likely to be developed into a very good composing app. Dorico is quite lovely in many ways but as Keary explains in his Tanticrul YT persona, it forces the composer to work the way IT wants you to, rather than Sibelius which gets out of your way most of the time. Keary is a composer so I think he's bringing that to the table insofar as development of MuseScore.

I like Dorico, don't get me wrong. I think it's cool and does some things waaaaay better than Sibelius. but for simple things, it's overly complex when it doesn't have to be. Dorico seems like it wants to bring in playback strengths from Cubase so it too can be everything to everyone. I still find this a fatal flaw in their ideology. This seems to have befallen all of the notation app developers...
According to Daniel Rey's Scoring Notes podcast, Martin Keary is no longer in that position. He has moved up the ladder and is now overseeing Audacity and Musescore--I forget the exact position--but it sounds like he is no longer the primary force behind Musescore.
 
Top Bottom