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Once Great, Now Unavailable Libraries?

mojamusic

Active Member
Remember NS Drums and congas? They were a deep sampled percussion that sounded amazing at the time. I remember the company seemed to fall on hard times and closed.
 

drumman

Active Member
Several mentions of Larry Seyer's acoustic bass. Wish I had bought it. Lots of character.

But wasn't it converted or sold as a Kontakt library at some time? I don't mean converted through Chicken Systems or something like that (or maybe that had something to do with it). I'm nearly certain I recall some Kontakt version of it. A Google search turned up some heading like "Larry Seyers Upright Acoustic Bass for Kontakt GIGA," but the link went to some unrelated site.

Anyone remember a Kontakt version of some sort after the original library was discontinued?


 

TomislavEP

Active Member
Without any doubt: Albion Legacy and Albion Loegria.

I've finally purchased Legacy at the very end of its life, paying the full price in GBP + VAT just before Spifire decided to put her to pasture only a few months later. I really didn't expect that move, though I can now understand their motives to some degree.

I still haven't upgraded to One mainly due to the described experience, but I also feel that Legacy is more suitable for my personal style and needs.

I'm perhaps even more surprised they've scraped Loegria as well. It is an unique library in many ways. I especially love its string and percussion sections but also many things from Stephenson Steam Band II. Anyway, Legacy, Loegria and Tundra will certainly remain the cornerstone of my orchestral collection.
 
OP
DarkestShadow

DarkestShadow

Senior Member
Does that make sense logistically? I get the feeling around always wanting to be able to access great libraries. This thread is no doubt proof that there were some great VIs I never knew about and missed out on..but still, does this make sense from a business perspective?

Even if you created a separate legacy section on the website to keep these libraries available, then what? You can announce that you no longer support them, but that doesn't mean you don't get continued inquiries about bugs and problems that come up as the library gets older, but the platforms continue to change. At some point, that legacy library becomes a point of frustration for users and can impact the perceived quality of your brand. Maybe not devastating, but not really ideal. Then how do you price these legacy libraries? If they diminish in value, and fewer people buy them over time, does the revenue justify the work and resources for hosting and distributing it? Then how do you deal with royalties? Is it worth it to send out royalties from these libraries that don't generate much in revenue anymore? It just seems like more of a hassle than its worth.

I would hope that if the idea is to maintain old libraries, they do so in a way that is already in practice. 8DIO updates the engines, cut some of the fat and rereleases them. As does Spitfire. Orchestral Tools just packaged the legacy woodwinds with the new one and sold them together. Any of these seem like fine compromises to me.
Fewer people will buy and prices will be less but it's still more profitable than pulling the library and making 0$.
Not sure how much hosting costs there are, certainly depends on how clever you deal with that, but hard to imagine these costs will be more than the library revenues, unless you start to sell a 100GB library for 20$. Although, thinking about it that may actually lead to a lot of purchases haha.
Royalties can be calculated based on what you're still making from them.
And, if you specify that there will be no support then you may still get some inquiries but those can be disregarded since it was specified previously. + Hopefully people can read and it won't be too many. :P
 

chocobitz825

Senior Member
Fewer people will buy and prices will be less but it's still more profitable than pulling the library and making 0$.
Not sure how much hosting costs there are, certainly depends on how clever you deal with that, but hard to imagine these costs will be more than the library revenues, unless you start to sell a 100GB library for 20$. Although, thinking about it that may actually lead to a lot of purchases haha.
Royalties can be calculated based on what you're still making from them.
And, if you specify that there will be no support then you may still get some inquiries but those can be disregarded since it was specified previously. + Hopefully people can read and it won't be too many. :P
fair points. in the matter of royalties, I don't mean paying out the fixed royalties, as much as i mean the cost associated with processing fees to various players, and keeping record of their payment info and making sure there are no mistakes in the processing. I mean, at some point its like those cases where you're printing royalties checks for the sum of 10 cents, and it costs you $2 to process and mail the whole thing.
 

Ryan99

Senior Member
Alchemy still works on Windows. At least you weren't left out in the cold as far as authorization. I guess if I were a developer and were offered millions for my product I would take it.
Yes, I can still use it, but no possibilities to get the awesome missing expansions and no more support.
 

charlieclouser

Senior Member
Denny Jeager’s strings are still available here :
https://www.quparts.com/Apple-Logic-EXS-Instruments-and-loops-s/54.htm

Including other formats
I will sheepishly admit to buying the Quparts version of Jaeger strings for EXS - recently. Back in the eighties I was the co-pilot on some TV scores and we booked an afternoon in a Synclavier room to sweeten our cues which were done entirely on a Korg 01/w, Wavestation, S-950, and TX-802. When the operator loaded up the Denny Jaeger strings on the Synclav and I played a chord it was a religious experience that I don't think I've ever recovered from.
 
I will sheepishly admit to buying the Quparts version of Jaeger strings for EXS - recently. Back in the eighties I was the co-pilot on some TV scores and we booked an afternoon in a Synclavier room to sweeten our cues which were done entirely on a Korg 01/w, Wavestation, S-950, and TX-802. When the operator loaded up the Denny Jaeger strings on the Synclav and I played a chord it was a religious experience that I don't think I've ever recovered from.
And how is it now, playing the denny jeager’s strings?
Still religious or was it one of those moments that we are allowed to experience in our lives from time to time, in which all seems to come together in a way that cannot be planned for?
 

charlieclouser

Senior Member
And how is it now, playing the denny jeager’s strings?
Still religious or was it one of those moments that we are allowed to experience in our lives from time to time, in which all seems to come together in a way that cannot be planned for?
I do have a few of the sample maps from the current EXS Jaeger strings in my active library. They have something similar to the old Kirk Hunter strings from the Akai era that I still use - a bit of that thick and distant sound quality that made even some crude ROMpler workstation strings work in context. I still use a few Kirk Hunter maps all the time because they're just so darn thick and indistinct - one of the old tremolo strings patches is so nice and blurry that you can barely tell it's a tremolo - it just sounds like sustain strings with a bit of wiggle. Neither the Jaeger or Akai-era Kirk Hunter strings are in the same league as modern libraries in terms of detailed sound or sophisticated mapping, but... there's something about the tone that I like. It's "non-weedy" - not thin at all, and makes very simple parts sound bigger than they are, and the smoothness across the keyboard is often much better than modern libraries that were sampled section-by-section and then combined in the sampler.

Respect to Denny Jaeger for being one of the true pioneers - and getting a great tone.
 

Brian2112

Active Member
Not an instrument but Wizzoverb W2 and W5 are my favorite reverbs to this day. Gone! Activation servers aren’t even alive anymore.
 

storyteller

Senior Member
Native Instruments B4II (still works in 64 bit emulation mode, but unavailable to purchase). Still my go-to Hammond.

Linplug RMIV
... version V was buggy and both are discontinued.

I’ll second both Garritan solo instruments (Stradivari and Gofriller). I feel lucky to own them. But I love the Bohemian series most today.

On the FX side of things, URS Channel Strip Pro (32 bit only)... http://www.ursplugins.com/ursStripPro.php
 

IdealSequenceG

Who seeks ultimate sequencing of VI
Albion Legacy

I prefer the tone of the instrument in Legacy. One is too FF sound for me, so it's hard to use it if it's not an Epic genre.

 
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