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Seycara

Member
I am making a 10k audio pc and am currently stuck between two possible configurations:

i7-7700k with 64gb 3000mhz ddr4

or

i7 6800k/i7 6950x with 128gb 3000mhz ddr4

I know that the broadwell-E cpus have quad channel ram support as well as support up to 128gb ram which would be useful for insanely large templates while the kaby lake build only supports up to 64gb with dual channel ram. However, on per-core performance bases, kaby lake destroys broadwell-e with no contest. Any ideas on which one would be better? I am mainly working with large orchestral templates and would like this to be good for next 5-7 years. Thanks!
 
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Seycara

Seycara

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Seycara

Seycara

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With a 7700k and 64GB Ram, what parts do you plan to include that bring the cost up to 10k?

2x 960 pro m.2 2tb

gtx 1080 ti graphics card (I do gaming as well)

custom watercooling for cpu and gpu

Asus STX ii audio card

144 hertz wqhd ips monitor
 

IoannisGutevas

Active Member
10k for a single audio pc? Damn thats a lot of wasted money my friend. You can easily build 3 monster machines and get a whole lot of value out of your money. Get 3 monster pcs with 64gb each and an I7-5930K and VEPro 6 and you are golden :) .

Dont waste your money building a single machine for 10k. It just doesnt worth it for audio production. No matter how great the cpu is you will run into limitations a lot sooner than if you have 3 machines for the same money.

My advice is make a good monster pc for 3k with 64gb ram and a good cpu and graphics card. Idk what kind of audio production or if you plan to make a HUGE template with your DAW but i bet thats it will be more than enough for your needs. Test it. Then if you see that you are running it into the limits get VEPro 6 and buy another monster pc for another 3k. then if you are still limit that too buy a 3rd one.

But dont waste your money buying a SINGLE PC for 10k. You will regret it trust me.

Also a very good informative video that you should see to understand more on how the whole audio / technical shenanigans work is this :

 

Gerhard Westphalen

Scoring Mixer
2x 960 pro m.2 2tb

gtx 1080 ti graphics card (I do gaming as well)

custom watercooling for cpu and gpu

Asus STX ii audio card

144 hertz wqhd ips monitor

Seems difficult to get up to 10k with that. Seems more like a 5k computer but I don't know how much the monitor is.

I also suggest not getting a single computer. 3k gets you pretty much the best you'd want for audio with the 6800k and 128GB. No water cooling or anything like that.

Then you could get a separate gaming PC which has lower ram and processor specs with your fancy looking case and cooling.
 

Anders Bru

Active Member
10k for a single audio pc? Damn thats a lot of wasted money my friend. You can easily build 3 monster machines and get a whole lot of value out of your money. Get 3 monster pcs with 64gb each and an I7-5930K and VEPro 6 and you are golden :) .

Dont waste your money building a single machine for 10k. It just doesnt worth it for audio production. No matter how great the cpu is you will run into limitations a lot sooner than if you have 3 machines for the same money.

My advice is make a good monster pc for 3k with 64gb ram and a good cpu and graphics card. Idk what kind of audio production or if you plan to make a HUGE template with your DAW but i bet thats it will be more than enough for your needs. Test it. Then if you see that you are running it into the limits get VEPro 6 and buy another monster pc for another 3k. then if you are still limit that too buy a 3rd one.

But dont waste your money buying a SINGLE PC for 10k. You will regret it trust me.

Also a very good informative video that you should see to understand more on how the whole audio / technical shenanigans work is this :

Very informative video. Thanks for linking! I'm not super technical, so if I were to buy a new computer, are there certain parts that can tell me if I'm gonna have a problem with the Real Time Performance, or is that something I have to read about in reviews / look on forums / talk to tech friends etc. about? As he said in the video, it can vary depending on plugins, poorly written code etc., but are there something in the hardware / OS - details on certain products that can give me a warning about potential Real Time Performance issues?
 

IoannisGutevas

Active Member
Very informative video. Thanks for linking! I'm not super technical, so if I were to buy a new computer, are there certain parts that can tell me if I'm gonna have a problem with the Real Time Performance, or is that something I have to read about in reviews / look on forums / talk to tech friends etc. about? As he said in the video, it can vary depending on plugins, poorly written code etc., but are there something in the hardware / OS - details on certain products that can give me a warning about potential Real Time Performance issues?

You can make music from a 4gb laptop dual core to a 64gb monster pc or network of pcs. Most of pcs you can buy nowdays i can say with certainty that you wont be having Real Time Performance issues. That said, it doesnt mean that all parts will work equally good together as far as audio production is concerned. For example you can have a 7200rpm hard disk and you can have an SSD. Both viable for music production but ssd is MUCH faster. You can also optimise your software for music production also. Especially in windows there are a lot of little tweaks that can help.

There is a simple test though to see if your pc is good for music production. The problem is when you have faulty hardware or something causes spikes on cpu and causes audio dropouts. You can use this program to check and after you understand whats wrong to fix it accordingly : http://www.resplendence.com/latencymon or http://www.thesycon.de/eng/latency_check.shtml .

Audio production can be very depending but it doesnt mean it will be as depending for you. It all comes down to what kind of music you wanna compose. And even then there are different approaches you can min/max the efficiency with the workload on your pc.
 

ResSerp

New Member
Why not get a professional DAW builder to do it for you? You'll have to pay for their experience, but it might be worth it. I read recently that some builders are actually making custom BIOS software for audio computers so they can turn off services that affect performance when doing audio.
 

chimuelo

Star Of Stage & Screen
I'm just waiting to see the announcement from AMD in Tapei, and also see the new Intel CPUs.

But here's what I do while waiting.
Have custom sleeved cabling made for everything.

This DAW is going to be for serious Orchestral work so an 8 Port Microsemi RAID Card will be used.
All samples will be on 6 x 1TB Samsung 850 EVO SSDs.
2 x remaining ports are for a dual M.2 Samsung 960 PRO NMVe RAID 1 config for OS+Apps.

Underneath will be Blu Ray Burner and a Thunderbolt 3 Dock with Type A and C Ports and CF Card.

Not sure what board or CPU yet.
But 128GBs of DDR RAM will be used.
Also a Cooler Master CPU AIO Water Cooling Loop.
I use one already and overclock to 4.6GHz.
Under full load only hits 70C.


IMG_1139.JPG IMG_1140.JPG IMG_1141.JPG IMG_1142.JPG
 

Jeremy Spencer

Senior Member
Why not get a professional DAW builder to do it for you? You'll have to pay for their experience, but it might be worth it. I read recently that some builders are actually making custom BIOS software for audio computers so they can turn off services that affect performance when doing audio.

My thoughts exactly...just because one selects the "highest end" parts available doesn't mean it's going to hold up. For audio and MIDI production (big templates, etc), you need to be careful; I made this mistake once. Personally, I would build a modest i7 machine with a solid slave(s) instead of putting all my trust into an expensive, single machine ($10K is a lot of dough).
 

Anders Bru

Active Member
You can make music from a 4gb laptop dual core to a 64gb monster pc or network of pcs. Most of pcs you can buy nowdays i can say with certainty that you wont be having Real Time Performance issues. That said, it doesnt mean that all parts will work equally good together as far as audio production is concerned. For example you can have a 7200rpm hard disk and you can have an SSD. Both viable for music production but ssd is MUCH faster. You can also optimise your software for music production also. Especially in windows there are a lot of little tweaks that can help.

There is a simple test though to see if your pc is good for music production. The problem is when you have faulty hardware or something causes spikes on cpu and causes audio dropouts. You can use this program to check and after you understand whats wrong to fix it accordingly : http://www.resplendence.com/latencymon or http://www.thesycon.de/eng/latency_check.shtml .

Audio production can be very depending but it doesnt mean it will be as depending for you. It all comes down to what kind of music you wanna compose. And even then there are different approaches you can min/max the efficiency with the workload on your pc.
Thanks for the info :)
 

chimuelo

Star Of Stage & Screen
The biggest leap we will see in performance this year is CPU Cache.
It is why Ryzens are really fast in spite of their poor memory controller latency.

The new i9 CPUs have 1MBs of L2 Cache.
That is huge....
 

JeffvR

Active Member
Very informative video. Thanks for linking! I'm not super technical, so if I were to buy a new computer, are there certain parts that can tell me if I'm gonna have a problem with the Real Time Performance, or is that something I have to read about in reviews / look on forums / talk to tech friends etc. about? As he said in the video, it can vary depending on plugins, poorly written code etc., but are there something in the hardware / OS - details on certain products that can give me a warning about potential Real Time Performance issues?
Well, a $180 sound card slows realtime daw performance down for sure. If you want big templates at low latencies better invest in a good audio interface like RME.
 

JohnG

Senior Member
Dont waste your money building a single machine for 10k.

Have to agree. You can build two excellent music computers for half that and still have a lot left over to devote to a gaming computer that will rock.

There was another thread about a week ago in which a relatively new user was extolling the virtues of a 12 core cpu with only 2.6 GHz, but he was making pretty strong statements about its effectiveness for audio.

I don't know about that as such -- I like fast CPUs for FX -- but the point is, I think, that combining great specs for gaming and audio into one computer ends up costing 2-3x as much as necessary. Separate them and save money.
 

JFB

Member
Well, a $180 sound card slows realtime daw performance down for sure. If you want big templates at low latencies better invest in a good audio interface like RME.

Make sure the audio card supports Direct Memory Access (DMA). DMA is an absolute must for real-time performance because a DMA card handles all the audio i/o from memory freeing the CPU for other tasks. If you're getting pops and clicks when your cpu's are hardly working it's likely your audio card doesn't support DMA. For this it's pretty much PCIe or Thunderbolt. I use a Lynx AES16e and I would imagine RME cards support DMA, as well. The CPU core count/clock speed hasn't been a bottleneck for years. I think @rgames said in his video.
 

Flaneurette

Active Member
That's a lot of money indeed. :thumbsup:

As said above, having multiple systems would be better. Have one dedicated DAW PC. So no email, no games, nothing else but only a DAW on it.
 
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