Need your opinion to clarify my Composing Procedure

Violeiro

New Member
I figure Beethoven thinking more on his dramatic romantic piano, Ive listened few of his strings works. However, I do remember to have listened to some Beethoven strings that sounded more conservative (Baroque), perhaps with more of this warm speed that Ive heard in yours.

I live right at the center of south america

I have some ascendence from italy under the surname Paganini - never knew if its a common name or If i have herited some still not used violin skills
 
OP
Luciano Rizzi

Luciano Rizzi

New Member
I figure Beethoven thinking more on his dramatic romantic piano, Ive listened few of his strings works. However, I do remember to have listened to some Beethoven strings that sounded more conservative (Baroque), perhaps with more of this warm speed that Ive heard in yours.

I live right at the center of south america

I have some ascendence from italy under the surname Paganini - never knew if its a common name or If i have herited some still not used violin skills
Hi
There are 1,400 families of "Paganini" in Italy , most of them located in the North-west side where the Violinist lived. Thus there is a possibility that you are his descendant
I assume you are from Brazil .However the important is to have mangos and coconuts may be without
working hard in the garden...
Bye
 

Violeiro

New Member
Its not so easy to grab them, except for giraffes, unfortunately, those are native from africa, while mangotrees and cocopalms are asian plants, so, nature didnt contribute for it to happen.
They end behaving most for sight.

An orchestra probably, but not a strings quartet - convincing three, you already got the majority. Be joyful and smile, bring a crown of flowers and soon they might be doing it - seems a joke but its a serious suggestion.

Waiting for hearing more 😉

So, 1400 and only one is the composer's true family?! I guess it will be up for the critics to decide If I am his heritor or not 😁
 
OP
Luciano Rizzi

Luciano Rizzi

New Member
Difficult to say , but I assume that along the genealogic tree of Paganini some families may have composers or musicians (tought not famous ) . I know that Paganini family had a big estate
(Villa Paganini) at Gaione (a village near Parma , not far from here) where the great -granddaughter of
Niccolo' Paganini died on 2016 at the age of 105 !!Other descendants were Andreina (1901-1998) and Giuseppina (1902-1987) , both musicians. Also consider that all the women in the tree that went married
have changed their surname , so may be that there are more descendent families with musicians

I have just purchased the Sonuscore Orchestra Complete and I'm trying to see if I can use it to do
quite everything without loosing time to navigate all the libraries to find the correct instruments for a piece. Another handicap I have is that I like a lot to invent themes but after playing with them and
after developing up to 80-100 measures I leave as they are because it would take too much time
to do a mixdown etc , so I skip and pass to something new frequently completely different
The result is that my PC is full of folders "work in progress"1,2,..25 and just one FINISHED
And you , what kind of music are doing ?
 
I'm pretty sure of what I'm about to say, but I'm no pro...

Exporting the whole song to audio and then reimporting for a mastering session is really just to get you to change your mindset properly, so you're not tempted to constantly go back and tweak things in the composition or mix. Mastering should just be for getting the proper loudness levels and subtle large-scale tweaking with compression, saturation, etc. (things that are more often done while mixing, hence "subtle").

For someone who is producing their own song from start to finish, I don't think there's any point in exporting and reimporting for a mastering session unless you struggle with letting go of the composition and/or mixing phase, or if maybe your computer struggles with having to play back your midi, effects processing, etc. in real-time.

One case in which it is necessary even for a solo producer though, is if you're assembling an album and need to get all the tracks sounding like they belong together.
 
OP
Luciano Rizzi

Luciano Rizzi

New Member
I'm pretty sure of what I'm about to say, but I'm no pro...

Exporting the whole song to audio and then reimporting for a mastering session is really just to get you to change your mindset properly, so you're not tempted to constantly go back and tweak things in the composition or mix. Mastering should just be for getting the proper loudness levels and subtle large-scale tweaking with compression, saturation, etc. (things that are more often done while mixing, hence "subtle").

For someone who is producing their own song from start to finish, I don't think there's any point in exporting and reimporting for a mastering session unless you struggle with letting go of the composition and/or mixing phase, or if maybe your computer struggles with having to play back your midi, effects processing, etc. in real-time.

One case in which it is necessary even for a solo producer though, is if you're assembling an album and need to get all the tracks sounding like they belong together.
Thanks Visiblenoise,
Things start to make (theorically) clear as I always considered the "Mastering" phase as the art of balancing all the 20 or 25 pieces I have to put on a CD.
The problem is that I don't know how to practically face this "phase" . Must I reload all the 25 audio pieces one by one and "compare" with a reference track ? or what ?. I see that using CD burning
software there is a "normalisation" option : isn't this enough ?
If not which is the less trubling procedure ?
 
Thanks Visiblenoise,
Things start to make (theorically) clear as I always considered the "Mastering" phase as the art of balancing all the 20 or 25 pieces I have to put on a CD.
The problem is that I don't know how to practically face this "phase" . Must I reload all the 25 audio pieces one by one and "compare" with a reference track ? or what ?. I see that using CD burning
software there is a "normalisation" option : isn't this enough ?
If not which is the less trubling procedure ?
There isn't anything you ever "must" do, but yea, a reference track would be helpful there. But perhaps more importantly, you're putting all your tracks together so you can compare how they sound easily, and have different effects chains for each to fix problems. Maybe one track features completely different instruments, and you want to bring the frequency signature of it a little more in line with the others with some EQ, for example. Then if you do this, maybe the average loudness level is affected, so then you might want to fix that, etc.

Normalization does raise levels, but in a naive way by just scaling the volume for the entire file such that the highest peak is near 0db. General mixing and mastering for loudness involves compression which changes only the height of the peaks. There's no standard automatic process for this because loudness is so dependent on the material - if you don't want to get so involved in the loudness part, you could check out something like Izotope Ozone (or Elements), which can analyze part of a song and give suggested mastering settings. I got Ozone Elements 8 for free during a promotion last year and played around with it - decent results for not having to do anything.
 
OP
Luciano Rizzi

Luciano Rizzi

New Member
There isn't anything you ever "must" do, but yea, a reference track would be helpful there. But perhaps more importantly, you're putting all your tracks together so you can compare how they sound easily, and have different effects chains for each to fix problems. Maybe one track features completely different instruments, and you want to bring the frequency signature of it a little more in line with the others with some EQ, for example. Then if you do this, maybe the average loudness level is affected, so then you might want to fix that, etc.

Normalization does raise levels, but in a naive way by just scaling the volume for the entire file such that the highest peak is near 0db. General mixing and mastering for loudness involves compression which changes only the height of the peaks. There's no standard automatic process for this because loudness is so dependent on the material - if you don't want to get so involved in the loudness part, you could check out something like Izotope Ozone (or Elements), which can analyze part of a song and give suggested mastering settings. I got Ozone Elements 8 for free during a promotion last year and played around with it - decent results for not having to do anything.
Dear Visiblenoise
I see that there is a Izotope Ozone Imager for free : will this do what you say ?
 

dzilizzi

I just hang around pretending I know something
Dear Visiblenoise
I see that there is a Izotope Ozone Imager for free : will this do what you say ?
No, Ozone full version will do what he is saying but the free imager only does stereo field fix. Which should help with your mono to stereo sound, but it won't help with EQ, compression, etc... Usually mastering is a mix of EQ and compression/limiting, though depending on what you've recorded, things like a bit of reverb/delay to make them sound like they were recorded in the same space might be needed. That's usually done during mixing though.
 
OP
Luciano Rizzi

Luciano Rizzi

New Member
Dear Visiblenoise
After a while I found a Program "AAMS" (Auto Audio Mastering System) I've tried it before to purchase
and seems it can do a good job (at leas at my ears after some tests) mainly for people like me who have
no time (or no will) to go mad in mastering (I don't commercialize my music , thus I prefer to spend
most of my time to create music and scoring).