What's new

My experience with Reaper

OP
rudi

rudi

Member
More experiences...

I had to go back into Cubase Pro 9.5 to do some housekeeping yesterday...
I was looking for the pan law setting and it took a google search to find it...
which made me realise how good it is n REAPER that:

- all the settings except for Project settings are in the same place

- and... there is a search option so you can find them instead of having to scroll through dozens of settings and sub-settings

- I also love the fact I can save separate configurations to my computer when I am experimenting with layouts and shortcuts... and go back to previous configs if I needed to. In Cubase I was always worried about messing something up when tinkering with settings.
 

MOMA

Member
Does anyone have a theme to recommend, that would not change the way I use Reaper but would look a little better than te default one, without clutter the screen ?

I like how in the default theme things are only as big as they need to be, but all that grey is a tad depressing in the long run.
Preferences differs, and I know there are many very competent musician that go for the dark style of themes. But I do prefer a brighter environment. I do like to colour my mixer for a faster navigation and workflow. I do like a bright background to my tracks when I cut, stretch or set envelopes. An I would say that the protools theme with bright background is the most clean, solid and clear space to work in – for me that is. You can find it on the Reaper forum.

MOMA
 

DANIELE

Active Member
Does anyone have a theme to recommend, that would not change the way I use Reaper but would look a little better than te default one, without clutter the screen ?

I like how in the default theme things are only as big as they need to be, but all that grey is a tad depressing in the long run.
I like the commala ones, pretty the same of the default one but better colors. I used the dark one and modified to my needs.

Look also at the V6 one, from what I've seen it seems pretty good so far. Maybe it will be the first time I'll use the default theme.
 

TomislavEP

Member
I must say that switching from Pro Tools to REAPER as a main DAW was a game-changing step for me personally, though my main motive was increasing costs of Pro Tools updates after the introduction of yearly subscription plans, which were more and more difficult for me to follow. The ethic of Cockos in that respect is certainly much more fair toward end-users with limited means and not only the big players.

However, other than that, I find REAPER superior to PT in many ways. The most obvious one is it's "blank sheet" concept - the possibility of customization, not only in terms of appearance is simply staggering. The second one is its rapid development cycle. If you are hoping to get a certain feature that could improve your personal workflow, chances are you'll get it in REAPER sooner than in other DAW programs out there. Finally, REAPER is a program with quite a small footprint which make it a solid platform for engines like Kontakt, Reaktor, Guitar Rig etc.
 

Fredeke

Active Member
Preferences differs, and I know there are many very competent musician that go for the dark style of themes. But I do prefer a brighter environment. I do like to colour my mixer for a faster navigation and workflow. I do like a bright background to my tracks when I cut, stretch or set envelopes. An I would say that the protools theme with bright background is the most clean, solid and clear space to work in – for me that is. You can find it on the Reaper forum.

MOMA
What's great is that I can very easily switch themes (without even restarting the program!) to match colors with my mood or the mood of the song I am making. Swell!
 

Fredeke

Active Member
I like the commala ones, pretty the same of the default one but better colors. I used the dark one and modified to my needs.

Look also at the V6 one, from what I've seen it seems pretty good so far. Maybe it will be the first time I'll use the default theme.
Those look very nice, and there a great choice of colors and variants :2thumbs:

I just realized I can even switch themes while the song is playing, without even a glitch ! Perfect for matching visual atmosphere to song.

@rudi I too used Cubase on Atari ST a lot... Did several albums with Cubase 2.0 (no audio, only MIDI) and it was a dream. Cubase was a real game changer in the sequencer world. It was first, I think, to introduce the virtual tape layout. Sequencers before that (like Steinberg Pro24, or the hardware Roland MC-500) were prehistoric in comparison (MC-500 lovers, fire at me now!)

Then I saw Cubase VST on PC, and its next installments, and I just wanted to rip my eyes off. Definitely too much flash and clutter.
I used to use ProTools 5 (or was it 6) on Mac OS9 and that was great. But now Reaper is my man.

I never saw the Atari Falcon version of Cubase (Cubase Audio), which came between the ST and the PC versions. But back when it was released, it seemed fantastic: at last it could record audio, so no need for expensive and clunky tape synchronisation anymore ! It was limited to 8 tracks, but which home studio had more than an analog 8-tracks anyway ? (As for big studios, they could afford the early ProTools)

The Atari Falcon had an onboard DSP, for whatever it was worth, but I doubt it had 8 inputs, so I suppose you could only record 2 tracks at a time - which would have been ok for me at the time. But it didn't sell well because, by the time, newly affordable PCs were pulling the rug under Atari, Commodore, and everybody else except Apple's feet.

Ah, memory lane...
 
Last edited:

Hasici

New Member
And I did the opposite, just purchased Cubase 10 PRO...it is right now probably the best deal in a long time with the 50% on top of cross-grade deal. The PRO can be had for $170USD (or $255 CAD) + $35 for dongle if you have any of those crossgrade legitimate products. And not tax which is cool. It makes it the cheapest big boys DAW.

But for sure personal license for reaper is a gift. The 5 already have spectrum editing which is awesome and few other things that even big editors still lack. I am very easy to forgive any issues or idiosyncrasies with reaper. Much less with other DAWs.
 
OP
rudi

rudi

Member
@rudi I too used Cubase on Atari ST a lot... Did several albums with Cubase 2.0 (no audio, only MIDI) and it was a dream. Cubase was a real game changer in the sequencer world. It was first, I think, to introduce the virtual tape layout. Sequencers before that (like Steinberg Pro24, or the hardware Roland MC-500) were prehistoric in comparison (MC-500 lovers, fire at me now!)

Then I saw Cubase VST on PC, and its next installments, and I just wanted to rip my eyes off. Definitely too much flash and clutter.
I used to use ProTools 5 (or was it 6) on Mac OS9 and that was great. But now Reaper is my man.

I never saw the Atari Falcon version of Cubase (Cubase Audio), which came between the ST and the PC versions. But back when it was released, it seemed fantastic: at last it could record audio, so no need for expensive and clunky tape synchronisation anymore ! It was limited to 8 tracks, but which home studio had more than an analog 8-tracks anyway ? (As for big studios, they could afford the early ProTools)

The Atari Falcon had an onboard DSP, for whatever it was worth, but I doubt it had 8 inputs, so I suppose you could only record 2 tracks at a time - which would have been ok for me at the time. But it didn't sell well because, by the time, newly affordable PCs were pulling the rug under Atari, Commodore, and everybody else except Apple's feet.

Ah, memory lane...
@Fredeke, yes, bringing back some (good) memories. I actually owned a Falcon 030 with MultiTOS, and MiNT, and Cubase. It was a great machine well ahead of its time, super efficient, with a great display and lots of ports, including MIDI. I never did use the audio side of it, only some keyboards and some early expanders. I have some fond memories of my ST1040 too, and dabbling with GFA Basic!

Like you I had a "yeuch" moment when Cubase migrated to PCs - it seemed like a retrograde step at the time, but eventually the hardware and Windows advanced to a degree that was hard to imagine back then.

I also owned a Yamaha CX5M computer which seemed fantastic too, with its built-in FM chip.

:2thumbs:
 
OP
rudi

rudi

Member
And I did the opposite, just purchased Cubase 10 PRO...it is right now probably the best deal in a long time with the 50% on top of cross-grade deal. The PRO can be had for $170USD (or $255 CAD) + $35 for dongle if you have any of those crossgrade legitimate products. And not tax which is cool. It makes it the cheapest big boys DAW.
Cubase is a great programme indeed. I looked at upgrading from 9.5 Pro to 10 Pro, but didn't find anything compelling for my use of it :) I also think I've been experienced Cubase fatigue... from the very early version through decades of upgrades.

I love how quickly Reaper loads, the flexible interface, and the way you can customise it so thoroughly and extensively. It's helped to streamline my workflow a huge deal!

Let us know how you get on!!! :)
 

Michelob

Pouet pouet !
Hi everyone,

Reaper user here, since 2011 when I started music for a living (composing, recording and music editing with this DAW). I was previously using Cubase and Logic Audio (in another life around the 90s).

Previous posts in the current thread talked about SWS and Reapack (community interactive scripts pack), but I'm not sure their web links were notified. Just in case some new users would read this, here they are :

http://www.sws-extension.org/

https://reapack.com/

Just install Reaper, then SWS and Reapack. Huge stock of complex custom actions in your hands.

Oh, and about the theme, after having tried some of them (like the somptuous WT_Imperial), I systematically went back to my real favourite : Default 5 Dark Extended.

Bye

Michel
 

Fredeke

Active Member
@Fredeke, yes, bringing back some (good) memories. I actually owned a Falcon 030 with MultiTOS, and MiNT, and Cubase. It was a great machine well ahead of its time, super efficient, with a great display and lots of ports, including MIDI. I never did use the audio side of it, only some keyboards and some early expanders. I have some fond memories of my ST1040 too, and dabbling with GFA Basic!

Like you I had a "yeuch" moment when Cubase migrated to PCs - it seemed like a retrograde step at the time, but eventually the hardware and Windows advanced to a degree that was hard to imagine back then.

I also owned a Yamaha CX5M computer which seemed fantastic too, with its built-in FM chip.

:2thumbs:
Never heard of the Yamaha CX5M computer... Was it aimed at musicians, like the Atari - or was it more like the C64: not aimed at musicians originally, but appropriated by them because it sounded great?
What kind of software did you use on it? FM trackers?

I too coded many big projects in GfA :). I miss that language, and could never find an equivalent on PC (and the GfA port to PC is so different I don't recognize the language). I once coded a whole beep-tracker in GfA - one of my proudest pieces of code, however it had a slight optimization problem that made it hardly usable ;)

I've been trying coding in C a few times, but it's too low-level for me. I just can't bring myself to think in terms of pointers (and end up crashing the app and blowing up my whole city block in the process more often than not), and rigid variable types annoy me, because I favor intuitiveness over efficiency (hence the unusable tracker :-/ ). The closer language to GfA in feel I could find is PHP, but its range of applications is much narrower. KSP is a joke, though there's little way around it. I haven't tried HISE yet, which uses javascript, which leans more towards being a real language. And the LUA book has been gathering dust for about a year now...

Apparently you've sampled a great deal of the Atari product line! Did you know of the 260ST ? It was an early model, coming before the 520 and 1040, with no ROM (system had to be booted from a floppy)! Then I went to a dual ROM Mega ST, with the overpriced tiny hard disk, making it at last feel like pro gear.

Indeed, the Falcon looked like an amazing computer! Motorola CPUs were so much better! Too bad the market didn't give the later Atari, Motorola, or Commodore (for that matter), a chance. I got a MegaSTE for cheap in the early 2000s, but traded it for a 2nd-hand ProTools TDM (not cheap, but you couldn't beat the performance). It now lies in a friend's "computer museum", and at least gets some love there.

For the ST, I remember purchasing the amazing Steinberg's MIDEX+, a cartridge that, in addition to allow multiple dongles to be plugged in at once (a mere convenience, but still), had 4 additional MIDI outs, 2 additional MIDI in, and an SMPTE LTC interface. The additional MIDI ports were great and quite indispensable to my setup, but the timecode interface was hm... how to put it? Let's just say it was 10 times cheaper than a pro sync unit, and its reliability somehow matched that. That's the main reason I recorded few audio tracks along my MIDI compositions. It just didn't work well.
 
Last edited:
OP
rudi

rudi

Member
@Fredeke

The Falcon was great, but also a rare beast, and quite expensive at the time.

I hadn't heard about the 260ST. You are right about the Motorola architecture - so much better than Intel at the time. I remember being horrified the first time I tried to add some keyboard hooks into Windows to read keyboard shift, control, alt states... it was a nightmate compared to TOS (that was so elegant and efficient).

The Yamaha CX5M was the result of something called MSX. It was the product of an alliance between MS (I think) providing the operating system and MSX Basic, and several Japanese manufacturers providing the hardware -- which each one specialising in a specific area. Yamaha's had a built-in expansion containing a 4op FM chip... at the time it felt revolutionary, especially in view of the cost of regular FM keyboards. It came with a basic GUI editor, and also a basic sequencer. I had the CX5M II. It was a good looking, solid unit, but the accessories were prohibitively expensive.

After getting my first PC (which wasn't good for music stuff at all), I discovered Turbo Pascal for MS-DOS. That was the start of my programming career (in finance, not music, but it paid for my expensive hobby), which was a fantastic programme. I never looked back and really enjoyed working in IT.

I am now entering a stage of my life where I can try to maybe earn some money from my musical hobby. I am learning a lot, and hopefully getting better at it :) Virtual instruments and orchestration is a very different discipline from playing in bands!!
 
Last edited:
Top Bottom