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My conclusion regarding new libraries

DSmolken

Senior Member
That's true, unless you're in a very competitive market with rapidly changing trends, and really do need the current sounds to avoid falling behind. But I don't know if even trailer music or hip-hop is really like that.

But as a developer, I try to make libraries that either allow things that couldn't be done before without getting realinstrumenty (like brushed snare stirs or weird cheap old guitars) or things that are kind of possible now but are a pain and could be done better/easier/faster. Yes, great music can be made without the things I sell. But hopefully they make the sound in someone's head more accessible.
 
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Goldie Zwecker

Active Member
Using the same logic I don't need an electric guitar, because I like Bach.
I would argue that this logic doesn't apply when it comes to virtual instruments and sample libraries. Even the pace of how new instruments were developed, how often new instruments came out/invented etc. I meant more in the direction of a string library from 2014, a new one in 2015, 6 new ones in 2016 etc etc.
Or for example take something electronic such as The Prodigy. Awesome music made 20 + years ago using old samplers and "primitive" daws.
 

Sibelius19

Music is just color and rhythm --Debussy
New libraries come out every week. One thought that comforts me is this:
If I/you like some songs, albums, tracks etc - that were made before this new library (fill in the blank) existed and you think they are great - than great music can be made without it.
Yeah, I kind of was coming to this conclusion myself....until I heard Indie by Sonokinetic. Ah! It never ends. Sometimes things just inspire me and I feel a need to get it, not because I want to keep up with others, but because I just love the sound of it and think it would inspire me. Indie is an example of this. Afflatus was an example of this as well.
 
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nas

Active Member
I think if you can make better sounding or more expressive parts as a result of the quality or new technical features a new library offers, that may not have been as easy to achieve to even possible before... then it's worth getting.
 

gpax

Senior Member
The “comfort” you take made me chuckle at myself, for those times I felt relieved that a new library didn’t sound better than the one I already owned. Relived, as it were, that my wallet or credit card was spared - at least that week, anyway.

The myth I’ve talked about before is believing in obsolescence: this notion that a new release somehow makes a prior one illegitimate or less effective has never made sense to me. As has been argued numerous times, many great mockups have been made with older and even lesser contenders. Yet, people will still post threads asking if library X is still relevant, right as I’m laying down a part with it.

Now there are new innovations and sonically superior libraries that emerge, as well as advanced workflows, and the appeal of new combinations and articulations. This, while subjective, is at the heart of why any of us would choose to buy or not. Our respective, personal finances are also key, though seldom acknowledged as such. Think about it: if money were no object, we’d invest constantly to get the strong points of each. Some of us do anyway, credit limit be damned!

Many here will talk about templates based around a preferred sound, which also translates into efficiency and investment, professionally. Others focus on hopes of integrating into their workflows a new library that will sound richer and more expressive. But again, I’m not sure we are always having the same discussions, as the range of established professionals, those aspiring to be, and undiscovered genius, all talk about the same release (or rejection of it) from the perspective of very diverse needs and economies.

To me, it’s all one giant sample library now. It goes through periods of shedding, adding, and refining, even as I’ve never bought into the illusion of one library that will be the perfect tool. Shorts from one still routinely blend with others; a dry solo wind from this one will complement the ensemble by its so-called competitive developer, and so forth. I’m a fanboy of all of them all in some way, depending on my project’s needs.

But you are right that yesterday’s track, made with yesterday’s library, is not undone by the new. Tomorrow’s track, however, may contain that inspired melody precisely because the expressive aspects of the new release made it possible. Wait! I think I just contradicted my own argument.
 

Wolfie2112

Senior Member
I would argue that this logic doesn't apply when it comes to virtual instruments and sample libraries. Even the pace of how new instruments were developed, how often new instruments came out/invented etc. I meant more in the direction of a string library from 2014, a new one in 2015, 6 new ones in 2016 etc etc.
Or for example take something electronic such as The Prodigy. Awesome music made 20 + years ago using old samplers and "primitive" daws.
Sure, but if the Prodigy made that same music today, it would have been done in a fraction of that time, and probably thousands of dollars cheaper. We live in a wonderful time for composers, we have tools that were only a distant pipe dream years ago. For me, if a new library sparks some sort of inspiration, I buy it.
 

ScarletJerry

Active Member
Using that logic, many people would save ALOT of money. I’m not talking about sample libraries, I’m referring to divorce attorneys and alimony payments.

Scarlet Jerry
 

bill5

Active Member
If I may interrupt this scintillating cat fight...

Using the same logic I don't need an electric guitar, because I like Bach.
That's not actually the same logic. The same logic using your analogy would be that great music can be made without an electric guitar, which is of course true...but I'm guessing your point is that new libraries that come along can make other great music possible (or sound better) that wasn't so before they came out, which in a very general sense is a reasonable assertion, at least some of the time. Of course the devil's in the details.

And wolfie is right, we live in an incredible time for composers, esp those who are not part of a band that fits what they're writing and can hardly afford session musicians.
 
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Goldie Zwecker

Active Member
Using the same logic I don't need an electric guitar, because I like Bach.
The logic is more in the direction of the relationship between samsung galaxy 8, galaxy 9 and galaxy 10 (or iphone for that matter) - and the direction of comparing something music from an era when an instrument didn't exist to an era when it did.
 
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