Mixing Audio vs. MIDI

Henu

Senior Member
I agree on many things here, and recommend people to check this video out.

One thing that is also really crucial is that in case of backupping things, it's really useful also to mix with audio: in that way, in case you need to go back to the mix backups later, you can still be 100% sure the audio sounds as intended.

I personally have two methods, depending on the project size. When working with multiple songs in the same project (a.k.a same mix settings for all tracks) I always have two separate projects when working with midi- one is the "record project", which has the midi data and VST's and the other is the "mix project" where I always import the tracks as audio.
In case I work with only one song, I render everything "in- place" in Cubase, disable the midi track and start mixing with the audio files. If I need to change something for some reason (let's say that I can't get a particular sound to sit in the mix so I need to use another patch), I just enable the midi track, do the tweaks, render again and then disable.

It's also crucial if you have more going on than just a couple of Kontakt instances in your project. Most of my songs also contain recorded audio so that's also another reason I like to mix everything as audio.
Right now I'm working with a project that has placeholder midis for demo tracks and all the vocal and instrument takes are recorded on top of those to-be-replaced placeholder tracks. After the recordings, we can start tweaking the previous quick midi tracks to fit the newly recorded audio, export everything out into the mix project, backup the "record projects" and pretend they never existed. :P
 
OP
ChrisSiuMusic

ChrisSiuMusic

Senior Member
I agree on many things here, and recommend people to check this video out.

One thing that is also really crucial is that in case of backupping things, it's really useful also to mix with audio: in that way, in case you need to go back to the mix backups later, you can still be 100% sure the audio sounds as intended.

I personally have two methods, depending on the project size. When working with multiple songs in the same project (a.k.a same mix settings for all tracks) I always have two separate projects when working with midi- one is the "record project", which has the midi data and VST's and the other is the "mix project" where I always import the tracks as audio.
In case I work with only one song, I render everything "in- place" in Cubase, disable the midi track and start mixing with the audio files. If I need to change something for some reason (let's say that I can't get a particular sound to sit in the mix so I need to use another patch), I just enable the midi track, do the tweaks, render again and then disable.

It's also crucial if you have more going on than just a couple of Kontakt instances in your project. Most of my songs also contain recorded audio so that's also another reason I like to mix everything as audio.
Right now I'm working with a project that has placeholder midis for demo tracks and all the vocal and instrument takes are recorded on top of those to-be-replaced placeholder tracks. After the recordings, we can start tweaking the previous quick midi tracks to fit the newly recorded audio, export everything out into the mix project, backup the "record projects" and pretend they never existed. :P
Thanks for your input Henu!
 

Beat Kaufmann

Active Member
Until about 2004, I was a Windows Logic user. Many projects were created with VSL samples together with Steinberg's HALION. The control of the library at that time was not as comfortable as it is today with the Vienna instrument. Furthermore, the convolution reverb of Tascam "Gigapulse" was used. I created the space and depths with it and I used Logic's EQs, compressors, limiters etc.

Unfortunately...
Logic said goodbye to Windows and its users. Tascam ceased operation of Gigapulse. The Vienna Library is now controlled completely different. Meanwhile, I already bought 3x a new computer... So times flies by and nothing is at it was. Attention: I'm talking about a period of 5-10 years - not about 30 years!

Many sample users create great and enormously complicated templates. Unfortunately, they never produce audio files from their projects. Attention: The more complex templates are, the more vulnerable they are. How quickly do you buy a new computer, soon are standarts outdated, licenses invalid, software obsolete. If you want to save your valuable projects for a longer period of time, then create an audio file for each instrument. Save these audio files as far as possible without any effect.

Beat
 

robgb

I was young once
I tend to freeze all my files to wavs and mix that way. If there's something there I absolutely have to correct, I unfreeze, fix the midi and refreeze.