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Michael Giacchino to score The Batman

KEM

Ludwig Göransson Fanboy
A sneak peek of the score (recording sessions)


I’ve listened to this clip a few times now and I’m just not really feeling it, Hans literally perfected the sound of Batman, Giacchino is a good composer so this isn’t even a slight towards him at all, I just can’t hear anything other than Hans Zimmer when someone talks about the music of Batman
 

JonS

Senior Member
I hear you! My background is very similar, and the Fred Karlin book was my guide when I got into composing for indie film makers in the '90's (I was already composing other music by then too).

The thing I love about good film music is that it's an 'art' and a 'science' (of making the technical stuff, hit points, finding the correct overall cadence and flow for a film, having some music material to rework throughout the score in order to make it all hang together and have some kind of subliminal impact on the viewer whether they realize it or not.

To help tell the film makers story. (That's why I do like Zimmer's work and he does service to the overall art of the film)

In one of James Horner's last interviews he touches on that aspect of composing for film... in that to him, it's an 'art form'. He's an artist working in his chosen medium.

Can some of today's most requested composers honestly say that they're in the business because they're artists first and foremost? Probably not very many of them. There are some great 'cut-and-pasters' and those who can mimic whatever temp score is thrown at them. Part of their job.

Have at it.

Nowadays, I'd love to hear the opera that Don Davis wrote sometime, or John William's Cello Concerto.

Or just revisit all the great film scores from the past that you've mentioned, and in turn, get inspired all over once again to love music.
I love James Horner's music for film but many of his scores can be heard in movie after movie after movie so though I don't know how much time he had to get some of these cues done but he has an awful lot of cut and pasting in his scores from one movie to another.
 

dcoscina

Senior Member
I’ve listened to this clip a few times now and I’m just not really feeling it, Hans literally perfected the sound of Batman, Giacchino is a good composer so this isn’t even a slight towards him at all, I just can’t hear anything other than Hans Zimmer when someone talks about the music of Batman
I think it depends on the cinematic vision of Batman. to me Elfman nailed it with his Herrmannesque score. But to each his/her/their own
 

dcoscina

Senior Member
@KEM & @Consona are there any "orchestra in a room that's it" scores that blew your socks off recently? This might be a matter of your tastes? ;)
I like Black Panther. Shazam by Wallfisch was quite fun. Anthony Willis' Promising Young Woman was amazing, especially how the music worked in the film.

But I've mostly been listening to classic Goldsmith scores. I'm working on a friend's film which needs a style like LEGEND so I'm studying that. Also, ballets like Daphnes et Chloe, The Wooden Prince and Firebird. Plus Le Sacre. You cannot really top those.
 

Arbee

Senior Member
I appreciate that this thread has voluntarily strayed a little off topic, but is "orchestra in a room that's it" a concept destined for the music museum given the contemporary sonic palette that is available? Not saying that's good or bad, but I believe the future belongs to those who can bring a similar level of artistry and craftsmanship to this new integrated hybrid sonic world.

I agree that nothing "strictly orchestral" has blown me away for quite some time, but is part of that a level of sonic fatigue with the pure orchestral palette? Once I heard The Matrix, HZ Batman etc there was no going back for me, despite my love for "unplugged" orchestral music of the masters. Going even further off track, I suspect that pure jazz mastery and rock guitar gods are heading for the museum in a similar way.
 

KEM

Ludwig Göransson Fanboy
I appreciate that this thread has voluntarily strayed a little off topic, but is "orchestra in a room that's it" a concept destined for the music museum given the contemporary sonic palette that is available? Not saying that's good or bad, but I believe the future belongs to those who can bring a similar level of artistry and craftsmanship to this new integrated hybrid sonic world.

I agree that nothing "strictly orchestral" has blown me away for quite some time, but is part of that a level of sonic fatigue with the pure orchestral palette? Once I heard The Matrix, HZ Batman etc there was no going back for me, despite my love for "unplugged" orchestral music of the masters. Going even further off track, I suspect that pure jazz mastery and rock guitar gods are heading for the museum in a similar way.

Absolutely, and that’s exactly the point I was trying to make, I totally respect strictly orchestral works and that’s what I study to help make myself better at music, but when it comes to the music I personally enjoy listening to I don’t really get much out of strictly orchestral music, there’s so much great musical technology out there now and people are constantly finding new ways to innovate with them and that’s what I want to hear, that’s why I rave about the TENET score so much, it doesn’t sound like anything I’ve heard before and it’s wholly unique, but this is just an orchestra, and although it may be well written, it just doesn’t grab my attention because I know exactly what I’m hearing…
 

Arbee

Senior Member
Valid point, @Arbee, but didn't this thread start with a clip of MG and an 'orchestra in the room'?
Indeed it did, but that just made me wonder what I wasn't enjoying about it. Was it the music, or was it the sonic experience, or both? My conclusion was that if "orchestra in the room" alone is going to trigger my music pleasure centre these days, it had better be exceptional.
 
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