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Michael Giacchino to score The Batman

zolhof

Senior Member
Matt Reeves' proposal to score the new Batman movie:


You might be wondering why David Arnold is dressed up as Godzilla...

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Or Leia...

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...

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:rofl:

He and Giacchino recently faced off at the Royal Albert Hall in hope of Settling the Score.

Anyway, I'm looking forward to hearing a fresh take on the Batman musical mythos. MG has shown interest in scoring the film before but I guess it's official now.
 

Consona

Senior Member
eca.jpg

to say the least

This Batman is described as a Hitchcockian noir movie, and no matter how hard I try, I can't imagine getting some Herrmannian level of music from Giacchino. Maybe I'm wrong and he'll surprise me, but after what he did in the franchises John Williams, Jerry Goldsmith and James Horner wrote for... the picture says it all.
 

I like music

Senior Member
eca.jpg

to say the least

This Batman is described as a Hitchcockian noir movie, and no matter how hard I try, I can't imagine getting some Herrmannian level of music from Giacchino. Maybe I'm wrong and he'll surprise me, but after what he did in the franchises John Williams, Jerry Goldsmith and James Horner wrote for... the picture says it all.

I liked Giacchino in Lost. Since then, I can't think of much that I liked (in fact, some of it downright annoyed me for some reason, especially ST). But when you get used to hearing Goldsmith flexing his muscle on Star Trek, surely anything will pale in comparison?
 

Consona

Senior Member
Goldsmith on Trek and Apes, Horner on Trek, Williams on Star Wars... Impossible to compete, but why? Giacchino is 52, he should be making master level music by now. His Star Trek theme was so nice, but the rest around that. Where's the grafulness of Horner's pieces? Horner was fricking 30 when he was writing for Star Trek and his skill level at that time was higher.

Not to mention Goldsmith on Rambo, which was overtaken by Brain Tyler, that's like the downgrade of the century.

Honestly I wish Mike Verta was composing for this Hitchcock-esque Batman. He'd nail it. Giacchino's not yet there music will make me squirm in the theatre seat. I'm harsh but this should be the best of the best level here, hollywood can afford anybody, yet it's not. At least it won't be the MI Fallout ultra-"epic"-loud cringefest.
 

Abdulrahman

Active Member
I've never been a fan of his work. Literally, no music he has done every captured my attention. Sorry, but that is the plain truth!
 

ProfoundSilence

Senior Member
composers are an interesting bunch :whistling:

"master level music by now" surely, many of the greats of different eras wrote breathtaking masterpieces when they were 19 - so I assume Consona you've got some master level works to compare? Unless ofcourse you're still in highschool, inwhich you'd be permitted to not be compared to composers of a completely different era, with a completely different experience, with completely different resources, with completely different taste.

MG would have been in highschool in the late 80s, jamming out to tears for fears or someshit
 

dcoscina

Senior Member
If there is one difference I hear between today's film composers and the ones from the Silver Age era, it's that the new breed is influenced by film scores whereas Williams, Herrmann, Goldsmith, Horner, etc etc were influenced by mid 20th century composers which informed their work. You can hear Berg and Varese in Planet of the Apes, Korngold in Williams' Superman and Hook, Mahler in Barry's string work, Ravel in Goldsmith's Legend, Prokofiev & Shosty in Horner's work (debatable about HOW much you can hear since some of it is literally copied but that's another topic). Part of it is because directors are temping their movies with other scores rather than classical music. But I also think this cannibalism is due in part to the newer generation not being fluent or cognizant of the modern orchestral masters. I could be wrong but aside from guys like Powell who openly admit they don't listen to film music, it seems to be a prevalent thing.

Additionally, thanks to modern technology and samples, I wonder how many composers have had time in front of a real group of musicians or have studied orchestration at all. Conrad Pope gave a terrific interview to ScoreCast a few years back discussing the pitfalls of MIDI composing. It was right on the money. It's amazing to hear a real orchestra and see how the different sections work, and even if you aren't given the opportunity to work with one, everybody composing using orchestral samples should seek out local groups to listen to, watch their rehearsals, go to large symphony concerts if you live close to a major city. Everyone can learn more about phrasing, balance, and structure by being exposed to these masterworks. And having a good sense of overall architecture is pivotal in producing a score that is dramatically effective and satisfying. Pieces that move from one idea to the next without any kind of development or variation make it hard to connect with. And I think to a degree this is what Giacchino suffers from- he might have a good idea but it's never really fleshed out the way Williams could take that opening motive from E.T. on piccolo and recap it in the finale with full orchestra which punctuated that film (and score!).
 
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JonS

Senior Member
eca.jpg

to say the least

This Batman is described as a Hitchcockian noir movie, and no matter how hard I try, I can't imagine getting some Herrmannian level of music from Giacchino. Maybe I'm wrong and he'll surprise me, but after what he did in the franchises John Williams, Jerry Goldsmith and James Horner wrote for... the picture says it all.
Giacchino is horrible. Perfect example of how luck has more to do with success than anything else. I can't stand his music.
 

Hans-Peter

Active Member
Plus, it sounds like this....without the extra notes...
Ever thought that this is an obvious reference to the death march and perhaps integral to the plot (as in Bruce Waynes' parents being killed with the weapon that Battinsons' bat sign on the suit is made of)?

And btw, to all the haters here, your opinion is noted, but have any of you listened to LOST by Giacchino? Still to this day one of the most innovative scores ever made (especially TV) - ok; minus the romantic and emotional stuff, but the mythical and action-related elements are unique. And then there are the Incredibles. Giacchino can do ok but in some cases crazily excel in what he is doing - especially when he is passionate about the project, which very much appears to be the case with Batman.

I'm quite happy he was chosen for The Batman (and this is coming from an extreme Batman aficionado). Of course, everybody is entitled to their own opinion. Just had to bring some balance to the bashing in the previous posts.
 

Robin Thompson

New Member
Surprised no one's mentioned his previous scores for Matt Reeves - ie the Apes movies - which were quite good and of a style that could be very fitting for B-man. No doubt why Reeves kept him on. And his Spidey scores have been excellent. I'm not MG's biggest fan either, but I see no reason to be pessimistic here.
 

dcoscina

Senior Member
And yet Giacchino is the one scoring major Hollywood movies & winning an Oscar along the way, while you guys have been doing…whatever it is you’ve been doing.
Oh this old chestnut again? So following your argument logic, Ariana Grande is even more legit because she’s more popular, has won countless awards, and has worked with the top people in the industry.

Additionally, this means Gia is way more successsful than that loser Alex North who never won an Oscar in his life except that bullshit token the academy gave him before he croaked. And I suppose John Powell is also at the same level as us plebs who have no right to voice an opinion since he’s never received an Oscar.

It’s a forum man, and while opposing viewpoints are welcome, don’t use nonsensical barbs like “what have we done?” To invalidate those with opinions that don’t line up with yours.

One last thing- even if we entertain your straw man argument here, why is it that composers like Tom Newman, John Powell, JN Howard or many others never receive the same negative comments here or many places? Perhaps it’s because they are universally well respected composers who actually write really solid music? Hmmm?

Damn, I’d love to hear a Thomas Newman Batman come to think of it…
 
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Loerpert

Member
Oh this old chestnut again? So following your argument logic, Ariana Grande is even more legit because she’s more popular, has won countless awards, and has worked with the top people in the industry.

Additionally, this means Gia is way more successsful than that loser Alex North who never won an Oscar in his life except that bullshit token the academy gave him before he croaked. And I suppose John Powell is also at the same level as us plebs who have no right to voice an opinion since he’s never received an Oscar.

It’s a forum man, and while opposing viewpoints are welcome, don’t use nonsensical barbs like “what have we done?” To invalidate those with opinions that don’t line up with yours.

One last thing- even if we entertain your straw man argument here, why is it that composers like Tom Newman, John Powell, JN Howard or many others never receive the same negative comments here or many places? Perhaps it’s because they are universally well respected composers who actually write really solid music? Hmmm?

Damn, I’d love to hear a Thomas Newman Batman come to think of it…

Just interested. What did Giacchino do to deserve al the negativity? This is a genuine question since that's all new to me :)
 
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