Melda releases statement suggesting Mac users finally consider switching to Windows

chocobitz825

Senior Member
As a user I do prefer macOS over Windows by a mile. If there was a desktop Mac with good thermals, modular components, and not costing +$7000 that's where I'd be (I live in Mexico and Apple adds an extra 20% to all its products). There is a huge market for that segment which Apple is ignoring and is being filled by creatives moving to Windows or building a hackintosh.
Yeah, I get every complaint about hardware from apple, which is why we can only be thankful that its a tightly controlled experience. It's not their strong point anymore, and the optimizations they make on the OS end to make it run as well as it does help a lot. I have a 2016 MacBook pro that runs great other than the shit butterfly keys I'm getting repaired this week. I got maxed-out iMac Pro and its fantastic. No doubt there are more powerful PCs for much cheaper, but it's my business workhorse and I've already made my money back with it. Since there are no perfect options, and I am touring a lot, I think I'll have to settle on a Mac Mini moving forward instead of getting a new MacBook. It's enough to get the job done. All of it is so much easier since switching most of my peripherals to thunderbolt 3/USB-C. The best part is if I ever have issues with the MacBook on the road, its an easy fix. No searching for parts, or waiting for someone to service it. I can just take it in and get it fixed, or swapped out for a new one. That's everything to me on the road.
 

Pier Bover

Active Member
Yeah, I get every complaint about hardware from apple, which is why we can only be thankful that its a tightly controlled experience. It's not their strong point anymore, and the optimizations they make on the OS end to make it run as well as it does help a lot. I have a 2016 MacBook pro that runs great other than the shit butterfly keys I'm getting repaired this week. I got maxed-out iMac Pro and its fantastic. No doubt there are more powerful PCs for much cheaper, but it's my business workhorse and I've already made my money back with it. Since there are no perfect options, and I am touring a lot, I think I'll have to settle on a Mac Mini moving forward instead of getting a new MacBook. It's enough to get the job done. All of it is so much easier since switching most of my peripherals to thunderbolt 3/USB-C. The best part is if I ever have issues with the MacBook on the road, its an easy fix. No searching for parts, or waiting for someone to service it. I can just take it in and get it fixed, or swapped out for a new one. That's everything to me on the road.
I don't make a living with audio anymore, but if I did I would have no problem getting one of the upcoming Mac Pros.

The iMac Pro never made much sense to me. It's certainly fast and powerful, but it's still an all-in-one which cannot be repaired easily or upgraded. And once it's done, it's done. You can't use the gorgeous 5K display or other parts into a new machine. To me a pro machine should be like a Land Rover. Easy to open and fix and ready to get dirty and go in the mud every day. That was what the tower Mac Pros used to be and that's why a lot of people are still using those and skipped the trashcan. The iMac Pro seems more like an upgraded SUV than a Land Rover.

I imagine you live in the US, in the rest of the world Apple repairs are never as fast or convenient.

FYI if you do get the Mini do not use a 4K monitor as the GPU cannot handle much load and that will impact the audio performance. See these links:


 

Nick Batzdorf

Moderator
Moderator
is to make crap consumer oriented hardware
Really? I wouldn't say their hardware is crap at all - with the exception of that shitty keyboard they had a couple of years ago and since replaced.

Now, for a while they didn't have a Mac in their lineup that worked for me, which forced me to the used market when I needed to upgrade. And I agree with Synthetic (Jeff L) that the iMac Pro in a case would be perfect. But their stuff isn't crap.

Besides, you and I are consumers just like everyone else!
 

chocobitz825

Senior Member
I don't make a living with audio anymore, but if I did I would have no problem getting one of the upcoming Mac Pros.

The iMac Pro never made much sense to me. It's certainly fast and powerful, but it's still an all-in-one which cannot be repaired easily or upgraded. And once it's done, it's done. You can't use the gorgeous 5K display or other parts into a new machine. To me a pro machine should be like a Land Rover. Easy to open and fix and ready to get dirty and go in the mud every day. That was what the tower Mac Pros used to be and that's why a lot of people are still using those and skipped the trashcan. The iMac Pro seems more like an upgraded SUV than a Land Rover.

I imagine you live in the US, in the rest of the world Apple repairs are never as fast or convenient.

FYI if you do get the Mini do not use a 4K monitor as the GPU cannot handle much load and that will impact the audio performance. See these links:


Thanks for the tip!

I'm in Japan, and its mostly easy getting work down for apple products.

I totally agree with you about the iMac. I had a need to upgrade my machine and it was the only option available at the time, since the Mac Pro was still in limbo at that time. I don't regret it, and it is eventually going to be a waste of hardware if it fails, but I've also found that I tend to collect old devices and I really should start selling these things or trading them in/recycling them when I'm done with them. I mean...the old thunderbolt display. It was useful, but now it's just taking up space. So for now, since I've paid it off with my business, I'm gonna use it for as long as it makes sense to, and then when its time to move on, I will.
 

JEPA

Senior Member
What is going to happen to free software and open source development in regards Catalina?
 

dzilizzi

I just hang around pretending I know something
What is going to happen to free software and open source development in regards Catalina?
I'm thinking those developers who already pay the $99 per year for paid software will continue to provide free stuff if they did before. Otherwise, many will probably quit, as there is no reason to make free stuff that costs money and where you have to jump through hoops to get it out.
 

JEPA

Senior Member
I'm thinking those developers who already pay the $99 per year for paid software will continue to provide free stuff if they did before. Otherwise, many will probably quit, as there is no reason to make free stuff that costs money and where you have to jump through hoops to get it out.
Detriment of an ecosystem. ..
 

zircon_st

Lead Developer
Really? I wouldn't say their hardware is crap at all - with the exception of that shitty keyboard they had a couple of years ago and since replaced.

Now, for a while they didn't have a Mac in their lineup that worked for me, which forced me to the used market when I needed to upgrade. And I agree with Synthetic (Jeff L) that the iMac Pro in a case would be perfect. But their stuff isn't crap.

Besides, you and I are consumers just like everyone else!
The quality of Mac laptops has taken a huge nosedive recently. They are riddled with issues ranging from keyboard reliability (class action lawsuit for butterfly keyboards) to thermal throttling (or subpar performance) due to poor cooling. Not to mention Apple's anti-consumer decisions to make them almost impossible to upgrade or repair yourself. These are widely reported on.

There are also deeper, more fundamental issues with circuitry and construction. Louis Rossman, who runs a very popular independent Apple repair shop, extensively documents his repairs on a YouTube channel (with 1 million subscribers) and has found countless engineering flaws as a result. He is perhaps the most qualified person to speak on them, because he can see - year to year, model by model - what devices have the most issues, and what issues crop up again and again.

Aside from actual hardware defects and flaws, there are also intentional design decisions so bad that they should be considered flaws. For example, removing USB-A, ethernet, HDMI, DisplayPort (etc) ports, or getting rid of the incredible MagSafe power connector that has probably saved my wife's old MacBook Air about 100 times.

"Crap" might be a strong word. But the issues I'm talking about here should absolutely not exist in top-of-the-line, premium, luxury-priced products.
 

dzilizzi

I just hang around pretending I know something
It reminds me of my work computer. They have it so locked down, for good reason (especially considering some of my coworkers lack of computer literacy), but at times I end up using my personal computer to do basic research for work because I can't go to basic websites without requesting permission. And last week, I couldn't save a word document because suddenly my docs folders was read only. This is a new computer, which I'm starting to think has something majorly wrong with it. But we also just switched to Windows 10, so it may be software based.

I'm mentioning this because it looks like this is the direction MacOS is heading in. (And Windows also, though they appear to be backing off a bit) I think they may have good intentions, but not everyone visits bad websites and opens attachments on emails from people they don't know. Maybe they need a less locked down version?
 

Nick Batzdorf

Moderator
Moderator
The quality of Mac laptops has taken a huge nosedive recently
Okay, I'll take your word for it.

What I can say is that my early 2014 11" MacBook Air is wonderful. But that was before the new keyboards - it still has the one that couldn't be improved.
 

ProfoundSilence

Senior Member
It reminds me of my work computer. They have it so locked down, for good reason (especially considering some of my coworkers lack of computer literacy), but at times I end up using my personal computer to do basic research for work because I can't go to basic websites without requesting permission. And last week, I couldn't save a word document because suddenly my docs folders was read only. This is a new computer, which I'm starting to think has something majorly wrong with it. But we also just switched to Windows 10, so it may be software based.

I'm mentioning this because it looks like this is the direction MacOS is heading in. (And Windows also, though they appear to be backing off a bit) I think they may have good intentions, but not everyone visits bad websites and opens attachments on emails from people they don't know. Maybe they need a less locked down version?
it's not the software malfunctioning, just a poor IT department trying to limit non work activities but causing more harm than good.
 

DAW PLUS

Workstation nerd deluxe
Keep in mind that Logic only costs $199 and while windows computers maybe cheaper they charge for OS upgrades where Apple does NOT! I haven't paid for a logic upgrade EVER! Look, I have been a bit disillusioned by APPLE as of late but I know Logic better than other software and it just seems easier to use than most so it's hard to switch! I say just use what you need to use APPLES or Oranges (no pun intended)! And I hate that they keep changing things like the phone, the laptop ports , etc. But until people put a dent in their (APPLE's)bottom line it will remain the same! Horses for courses!
An XP license lasted for over a decade, so does W7 and now W10 is a continuous license being upgraded all the time without costs. I don't think the 100$ for a transferable license is really bothering many people. But then again, I am not a fan of comparing Macs and PCs using pricing in the first place. It is all about what floats your boat, although price/performance does play a role for many.
 

DAW PLUS

Workstation nerd deluxe
I think the reality is closer to the opposite of there being a tiny minority at Apple who is trying to keep the high-end flame alive. They know very well that high-end users are important as "influencers" to younger, less affluent, aspirational customers.

I'm not sure what the internal Apple term for it is, but you can think if it like the "halo effect" in automotive manufacturing, which is a big part of why Ford chose to make the $400,000 GT recently - a car that cost them ridiculous cash to develop and build, and will never sell enough units to generate a profit for Ford (some journalists even speculate that Ford loses money when the costs of the entire program and ongoing support are tallied up.) Even though production was limited to just a couple thousand units, and had to be largely outsourced to MultiMatic as opposed to taking place on the line at Ford, the fact that the public knows about their outrageous, world-beating supercar effort makes the more accessible vehicles like the Mustang more attractive. The thinking is that if Ford can build a car that will beat Ferrari at LeMans, then their street cars are probably getting some of that technology too.

And it works. Has done so for decades.

When we're talking about Apple and their high-end products like the new Mac Pro, it will be (and always has been) the situation that aspiring musicians / creatives will see Macs in use in big studios or by the artists whose work they admire. Even though the aspirationals may not plunk down for a massive ProTools rig and a 28-core Mac Pro right off the bat (or ever), they may be more likely to get a MacBook because then they'll be operating in the same universe, speaking the same language, as the professionals they aspire to be, or just want to work with. And once Apple's got their hooks into you with that first MacBook or iPhone, you're more likely to buy more Apple hardware as the years go by.

The fact that the software tools like Logic provide such huge power at such a low price is another enticement for young 'uns to go that way. Simplicity and ease-of-use of the UI and advanced software tools makes them feel like they're getting further, faster. And they are. By keeping these barriers to entry low, Apple makes their ecosystem an attractive choice for beginners who want to feel like catching up to the professionals is not such an outrageous pipe dream.

Back in 1986 or so when I was actually trained at Apple to be qualified to sell Macs at the Sam Ash store in Manhattan (the first music retailer to be allowed to do so), this was made very clear to us, even though we were "civilians" and not under Apple NDA - it wasn't a secret at al. In fact, it was explicitly stated to us that Apple's business model going forward was to eventually offer ALL of their software for free or at a "token" price point. Most software, including operating systems, would be free but would ONLY run on Apple hardware, and their most high-end software would be sold at a price that massively undercut the competition and could be considered a very minor expense for a professional.

Hence, thirty years on we get MacOS for free, and Logic with all the plugins and sounds is only $199.

This approach has two effects - it provides the users with a "bonus" to make up for the high price of the hardware and the perception of an "Apple tax", and the low price of tools like Logic would all but eliminate competition from software developers who could not compete on price because they did not have their development costs subsidized by revenue from sales of expensive Apple hardware.

Seems like it's working exactly as stated thirty-odd years ago.
IMO Apple indeed has used the MacPro as a "Formula 1" type product to show off how far their tech can stretch and how professionals work with it. Compared to laptops, tablets, phones and even iMacs the profit is probably hardly worth it, but it has a great marketing value.
 

dzilizzi

I just hang around pretending I know something
it's not the software malfunctioning, just a poor IT department trying to limit non work activities but causing more harm than good.
Well, it is also I work from home or in the field using a VPN connection. Or on a virtual desktop. They used to allow a lot more leeway but I think people took advantage of it and were not smart. One bad virus gets in can cause a lot of work stoppage.

So in the case of viruses, one bad apple can spoil the whole bunch.