Komplete Kontrol and my workflow !!!!

OP
M

MeloKeyz

Member
Alright, now ..... As I am reading the manual, I stumbled across this advanced topic "MIDI Assignment Editor" for MIDI control/program change assignments to knobs, buttons, ...etc and save all that stuff in a template. I understand the concept but I still don't understand the details in the manual so I tried to google useful guides or tutorials regarding this matter and couldn't find any. I just found links to articles that still sound like the manual. I even watched the full video tutorial of "KK MK2 Power Start" in Groove3 as I am a full subscribed member there. However, most of the video were talking about very basic stuff such as browsing libraries, transport buttons, encoder knob usage, ...etc.

Currently, I am manually assigning the most important parameters in an instrument to my knobs using the learn CC. I mostly use instrument tracks rather than MIDI tracks and from what I understood so far in the MIDI Assignment Editor, is that I have to only use MIDI tracks because the configuration refers to MIDI track numbers. The "Learn CC" is enough for me in the time being until I fully understand MIDI Assignment templates.

Your 2 cents is always appreciated. :)
 

TigerTheFrog

Reid Rosefelt
Currently, I am manually assigning the most important parameters in an instrument to my knobs using the learn CC.
I think you'd be better off taking the time to do this properly. It's one of the best features in KK and it would be a shame not to use it.

You must do this in the standalone application. Make sure you have the latest firmware.

Click the little MIDI icon on the top right next to the NI logo.

Start by adding a new template, which you do by clicking the +. Give it a name.

Map a single knob. Decide what you want written under it. The first button says "CC14," but change that to "reverb" or whatever you want. Do MIDi learn on the software so that the amount of reverb is controlled by CC14, the default setting for that first knob. Or you can change the default setting for that knob to another cc.

You would do well to read up on MIDI messages on page 122 in the manual. You need to know what absolute, relative, and relative offset mean. You can do program changes with the knobs too. The manual clearly shows you how to do this. It's just selecting from dropdown menus.

Even if all you can do is set up 2 or 3 knobs you are ahead, because you are learning how to do this.
After your first 8 knobs, you can add as many pages of 8 knobs as you want. So it's not a bad idea to start doing this with a plan for how you want to set up your pages, if there will be many pages.

If you want, you can re-assign buttons. You can set up key zones which give different colors on the light guides--very handy to find Keyswitches, etc. You can change the assignment of the touchstrip. You can change the pedal setups. All of these things only affect this single template.

It will take you a little while to set up the first one, but after a while, it will become easy to do more. And you can always go back and add to your templates. I am always revising mine.

This is just the basics. You can have different MIDI channels for different key zones and create splits with different colors. Or all kinds of things. This is a very powerful feature. It's good to start building templates and then learn a little bit at a time to make it do what you want.

These templates only work when the MIDI button is lit. Then use the up and down preset arrows to find the right template.

Finally, you should learn where these templates are stored HERE so you can make backups. You don't want to lose all that work.

I mostly use instrument tracks rather than MIDI tracks and from what I understood so far in the MIDI Assignment Editor, is that I have to only use MIDI tracks because the configuration refers to MIDI track numbers.
Not true. You just load up Komplete Kontrol as an instrument. Load up the instrument inside it, click the MIDI button and select the template.
What I do is save VSTs as track presets in Cubase where they load inside of KK.
 

jbuhler

Senior Member
Finally, you should learn where these templates are stored HERE so you can make backups. You don't want to lose all that work.
This is essentially. I've already had KK flake out on me and lose the templates. Fortunately, I was able to get them from a backup of the drive, but I've since taken to storing them where they are easier to find.
 
OP
M

MeloKeyz

Member
I think you'd be better off taking the time to do this properly. It's one of the best features in KK and it would be a shame not to use it.

You must do this in the standalone application. Make sure you have the latest firmware.

Click the little MIDI icon on the top right next to the NI logo.

Start by adding a new template, which you do by clicking the +. Give it a name.

Map a single knob. Decide what you want written under it. The first button says "CC14," but change that to "reverb" or whatever you want. Do MIDi learn on the software so that the amount of reverb is controlled by CC14, the default setting for that first knob. Or you can change the default setting for that knob to another cc.

You would do well to read up on MIDI messages on page 122 in the manual. You need to know what absolute, relative, and relative offset mean. You can do program changes with the knobs too. The manual clearly shows you how to do this. It's just selecting from dropdown menus.

Even if all you can do is set up 2 or 3 knobs you are ahead, because you are learning how to do this.
After your first 8 knobs, you can add as many pages of 8 knobs as you want. So it's not a bad idea to start doing this with a plan for how you want to set up your pages, if there will be many pages.

If you want, you can re-assign buttons. You can set up key zones which give different colors on the light guides--very handy to find Keyswitches, etc. You can change the assignment of the touchstrip. You can change the pedal setups. All of these things only affect this single template.

It will take you a little while to set up the first one, but after a while, it will become easy to do more. And you can always go back and add to your templates. I am always revising mine.

This is just the basics. You can have different MIDI channels for different key zones and create splits with different colors. Or all kinds of things. This is a very powerful feature. It's good to start building templates and then learn a little bit at a time to make it do what you want.

These templates only work when the MIDI button is lit. Then use the up and down preset arrows to find the right template.

Finally, you should learn where these templates are stored HERE so you can make backups. You don't want to lose all that work.


Not true. You just load up Komplete Kontrol as an instrument. Load up the instrument inside it, click the MIDI button and select the template.
What I do is save VSTs as track presets in Cubase where they load inside of KK.
Amazing explanation my friend, thx a lot. I will give that a try again tomorrow. I've spent an hour to figure out how to do that but it didn't work out for me. I am just being overwhelmed by these Relative, Absolute, ..etc. terms. Please note that this is the first time I sit in front of a MIDI keyboard. So, I am a completely newbie in advanced configurations. Of course, I am not newbie in technology in general but just in advanced Audio/MIDI configs.
 

jbuhler

Senior Member
Amazing explanation my friend, thx a lot. I will give that a try again tomorrow. I've spent an hour to figure out how to do that but it didn't work out for me. I am just being overwhelmed by these Relative, Absolute, ..etc. terms. Please note that this is the first time I sit in front of a MIDI keyboard. So, I am a completely newbie in advanced configurations. Of course, I am not newbie in technology in general but just in advanced Audio/MIDI configs.
Just experiment. You can go back and change the behavior of the knobs once you've played with them and decided which mode makes sense. Just make assignments, either matching the knob CC to the default assignments in the plug-in or by mapping the assignments in the plugin to the default CCs on Komplete Kontrol keyboard. (And for this, don't open the plugin in the Komplete Kontrol software.)
 

TigerTheFrog

Reid Rosefelt
Please note that this is the first time I sit in front of a MIDI keyboard. So, I am a completely newbie in advanced configurations. Of course, I am not newbie in technology in general but just in advanced Audio/MIDI configs.
You're doing great for a newbie! Just take it slow. Don't worry about "Relative, Absolute," just map a knob the way it is.

And if you make cc changes in the original plugin, remember to save it with a new name so that those changes will be there when you load it up next.
 
OP
M

MeloKeyz

Member
You're doing great for a newbie! Just take it slow. Don't worry about "Relative, Absolute," just map a knob the way it is.

And if you make cc changes in the original plugin, remember to save it with a new name so that those changes will be there when you load it up next.
OK, I have a new question now.

I opened my MIDI Assig. Editor today and worked on Template 1. I chose the "CC" type and have no clue which MIDI channel to use. This is the part that's confusing me. Based on my humble understanding, these channels are used to reference tracks in DAW. That's why I assumed that all my tracks should be MIDI not instrument tracks. So, as an experiment, I selected channel 1 along with the knob type "Relative" since I need this knob to be -1/1 approach. Closed the standalone KK and opened it in Cubase. Went to track 1, called up my instrument, and right clicked the reverb knob to learn the cc. I kept moving the knob to learn it but it didn't work.

See, the manual is explaining things in a very technical robotic way rather than highlighting useful steps to do.

What am I missing?