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Just HOW Important are Extra Microphones?

Parsifal666

I don't even own a DAW, I'm just a troll.
I felt this might be a super helpful thread for composers because way back I hesitated buying the full Hollywood Strings Diamond for lack of understanding.

Would really appreciated feedback from folks here and I hope everyone is having a very happy Springtime!
 

ProfoundSilence

Senior Member
I concur, you can sculpt the sound you want with microphones much easier than trying to correct with EQ's and reverbs. With enough choices - you can push the sound further back, closer - tighter, ect.

Here is a short example using the same passage 3 times.

Think about it this way.

I imagine the brass sit BEHIND the strings. I also don't imagine the strings to be right in my face, nor too distant and blurry.

Brass I imagine has some depth to it, while having SOME punch, without feeling like it's sitting in the middle of the cello section(for instance).

Using only 3 microphones(and to be honest, I'm not font of the ambient nor tree mics from spitfire brass/strings) I was still able to create the following sounds

1.) cellos tree, ttbn 2a tree, btbn 2a tree

2.) cellos "where I want them" depth wise, brass "where I want them" depth wise.

3.) cellos farther away than I want them, and brass closer than I want them.

They are all relatively the same volume(admittedly this was a rush job) but they both have a large difference in believable depth, how well they sit together in the mix/general frequency build up/ect. And both despite having similar inter-instrument volume levels - one is significantly clearer/conveys the orchestration. This also displays varied levels of tightness and punch - again - no reverb/eq/processing.

that said - this does take x amount more ram.

[AUDIOPLUS=https://vi-control.net/community/attachments/3mic-mp3.19619/][/AUDIOPLUS]
 

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nas

Active Member
Yes alternative mics are nice to have, not only for blending with other instruments and libraries, but also being able to tweak the mic settings for different articulations - shorts, longs, decorative, etc... is very handy. Then something like a master reverb (or two) can help glue it all together if needed.
 

rottoy

Plebeian
I think having three mic positions to choose from, with drastically different charateristics, is more than enough to have fun. When a library starts eating up disk space with 10 or more mic positions, the minute differences between them offers nothing but diminishing returns.
 

ProfoundSilence

Senior Member
I updated my original post to include an example of 1.) default tree mic 2.) how I would blend mics and 3.) how I wouldn't

all 3 are similar volumes - and all the same recordings/location/series(Spitfire symphonic strings and brass) but completely different end results.
 
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Parsifal666

Parsifal666

I don't even own a DAW, I'm just a troll.
I updated my original post to include an example of 1.) default tree mic 2.) how I would blend mics and 3.) how I wouldn't

all 3 are similar volumes - and all the same recordings/location/series(Spitfire symphonic strings and brass) but completely different end results.
I like your example, my friend.
 

ProfoundSilence

Senior Member
I like your example, my friend.
With libraries such as the berlin series - you can worth with even more.

2 different close mics, ortf - ambient - tree - surround... you can push it back bring it forward/back/widen/center/tighter/looser/even kind of shinier/more dull.

Spitfire series was never my favorite - but even in the berlin series - where everything is recorded at standard levels, in the same setups - in the same room, I drastically mix the microphones differently between sections. It's also painfully obvious how "flat" the demos on OT's website are that only use the tree mic.

I figured It's only fair that I use mics from libraries I don't even like to still sculpt a sound I am okay with, rather than being the raging teldex fanboy that I am
 

JohnG

Senior Member
Unfortunately I can't do mic positions so easily, owing to my shitty computer. And I certainly can't afford a machine good enough to handle all those mics.
Even if your computer is lame, a mic position (even one) that is sitting in the right location for the timbre you want can create a far more compelling sound than trying to EQ it to death and then douse with reverb.

Yes, the Big Guys who mix at Warner Bros and Abbey Road do use reverb and EQ, but they are starting with That Sound which only the room, the mics, the bodies (and the great players of course) can generate.

I've seen Bobby Fernandez sit there through an entire session at WB hardly touching the faders. He sets it and just lets it happen.

I like Bobby's approach; set it and forget it.
 
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