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Junkie XL acoustic treatment in his studio

sailenox

New Member
Hey guys,
i recently built my new studio desk and tidied up my studio. The next big thing is acoustics. I dont want to build a pro mixing/mastering room, but i want to mix and master as good as possible. Junkie XL once mentioned that he do all the mixing stuff on his own. I also watched his studio tours, but i cant see any acoustic treatment. Or does he mix in a professionall studio?
For my studio i thought about some basotect plates behind the monitors and some basotect in the corners. Is somebody here who can help me a little bit?
 

Peter Satera

Hungry Member
One thing I remember, is he mentions in one video that the music wouldn't be listened to in a perfect studio setting, which is why he hasn't treated the room. But I think his stuff is mixed by an engineer?
 

jcrosby

Senior Member
Hey guys,
i recently built my new studio desk and tidied up my studio. The next big thing is acoustics. I dont want to build a pro mixing/mastering room, but i want to mix and master as good as possible. Junkie XL once mentioned that he do all the mixing stuff on his own. I also watched his studio tours, but i cant see any acoustic treatment. Or does he mix in a professionall studio?
For my studio i thought about some basotect plates behind the monitors and some basotect in the corners. Is somebody here who can help me a little bit?
He also has a big room, and what look to be quite high ceilings. These both have a huge impact. His room also seems pretty wide. The smaller the room the worse acoustic issues are, period... E.g. a 30 foot long room has one dimension that is capable of handling roughly 40 hz...Any shallower distances will present an issue of course, but these are still big advantages 9 out of 10 people don't have...

Most people also have 8 foot-ish ceilings, producing an immediate mode issue between floor and ceiling. And given most people don't even have 15 feet of space in one direction, the average person in working from an acoustic disadvantage from the get go.

I personally will always treat my room. The difference it made in my room was anything but subtle.. (But I also went fairly extreme since I have an atypical room shape... Vaulted ceiling, however the vault runs laterally from left to right as opposed to down the length of my room). Even if I have the opportunity to move to a bigger space in the future, I'd still bring ll of my current treatment with me...

That said the 1st critical issue to deal with is placement... Having as much symmetry as possible means a more balanced stereo image, and is a mistake I see a lot of new musicians make. Working in the corner or on one side of the room immediately ads an additional disadvantage to any acoustic issues the room size/shape already presents.
 
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Nick Batzdorf

Moderator
Moderator
One thing I remember, is he mentions in one video that the music wouldn't be listened to in a perfect studio setting, which is why he hasn't treated the room. But I think his stuff is mixed by an engineer?

That's the argument for rooms that sound like rooms, i.e. that have some life to them.

It's also related to why muffling the sides is against my religion.
 

Pier

Senior Member
The geometry of the room is definitely the most important factor. If the geometry isn't right you will need much more than a couple of absorbers here and there, specially for the low end.

Like @jcrosby explained, it's practically impossible to get good low end on a small room.

If you want to take this seriously, I suggest you buy a calibrated mic and take some measurements with Room EQ wizard at the mixing position. This should help you in deciding what to do and seeing the effect of what you're doing in the room.

I did that and kinda tamed a massive resonance close to 100hz with some DIY absorbers I built.

Before:

1616385187728.png

After:

1616385176341.png

I only did this to be able to actually use monitors, because otherwise it was quite depressing.

Even with some acoustic treatment, I would not dare mix anything in this room.
 

GNP

Senior Member
Holkenborg once mentioned he used to work in 100% treated studios, and the results of translation into the world were not to his liking.
 

Dietz

Space Explorer
Modern panel absorbers (also referred to as "dynamic walls", sometimes) look like a simple piece of wall, while they are super-efficient acoustically - when done properly.
 

jcrosby

Senior Member
Holkenborg once mentioned he used to work in 100% treated studios, and the results of translation into the world were not to his liking.
That maybe fine for Tom, but mastering and recording facilities wouldn't spend potentially hundreds of thousands on acoustic design and installation just for the sake of spending money...
 
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