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Is trailer music a field too competitive?

MoeWalsaad

Member
The whole world is over-saturated in most fields (especially entertainment - and online business) are over saturated.

This is not an obstacle if you think you have the skills, discipline, and willing to grow connections and try to roll the dice over and over.
I think success in this field will be more about the connection than technical craft skills.

I think nowadays you can find a decent free youtube trailer music courses, or courses in Udemy sold for 9.99$, Torrented and accessible by some ambitious kid from a poor village you never heard of in Africa, of course, the industry is over-saturated, there are no craft secrets anymore hidden from anyone.
and I don't mean poor kids have access to your craft learning resources is a bad thing at all, but what I'm trying to say the world is changing, and we live in interesting times thanks to the internet, whenever you think this is the next trend, it's already too late. so one needs to think way differently.
It's difficult I know! and we are in the boat together!
My hopes that a new political and economic systems to be created so we can all live together in the future!
 
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Shiirai

Resident Crow
Maybe this will help you.

To take my own observations an example:

I'm a software developer with a passion for art. I've been messing with Game Design for quite a while and I want to make my own scores to my writing and concepts. This is what drives me.

So, not only do I need to get myself up to snuff in the fields of Game- Design and Development, I also need to put in the hours to get to the level I want to be at in my other artistic endeavors. Needless to say I have help, because nobody can do all that alone.

But the most important part about all this is that the Video Game market is oversaturated like you wouldn't believe. With the advent of Unity, Unreal Engine and Godot as low-cost gateways into Gamedev, the market is littered with people's creations.

I've found that most of it is uninspired, unplayable or exploitative shite.

This gives me the drive to get better and to do as much as I can in my endeavor to make something that has meaning and something that people will enjoy. I *know* I can do better than a lot of what's out there. It's still a gamble, and probably somewhat unrealistic, but that's all that's needed. Whether I'm objectively any good or not is irrelevant and best left up to other people to decide.

When I listen to a lot of stock-music, I only rarely come across things that make me go 'Oh. This, i want to put on my music player'.

So the bottom line is this. Do you think, without an overinflated sense of self-importance and while shifting your ego to the side, that you can do better than 90% of the junk that's out there and make your work stand out? If so, eventually you'll only be up against the 10% that actually know what they're doing (and always keep in mind that you *will* belong to the 90% until you escape the clutches of mediocrity).

Do you think you have what it takes and the balls to go for it?

That's really all that matters.
 
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OP
RAdu

RAdu

New Member
Do you think you have what it takes and the balls to go for it?
I don't know...but i'm working more than 12 hours a day to get there...I hope with time i will see the results. I agree that 90%(if not more) is junk out there and it's a hell of a ride to get out
 

Daryl

Senior Member
So the bottom line is this. Do you think, without an overinflated sense of self-importance and while shifting your ego to the side, that you can do better than 90% of the junk that's out there and make your work stand out? If so, eventually you'll only be up against the 10% that actually know what they're doing (and always keep in mind that you *will* belong to the 90% until you escape the clutches of mediocrity).
That's actually only part of it. You may also have to consider that many clients can't tell good from mediocre (and sometimes bad), or worse, they think their audience can't tell, or don't care, so even if you're "the best", with those clients you have no advantage over the rest of the world. You can only rely on getting regular work from the clients who do not fall into that category.
 

Shiirai

Resident Crow
That's actually only part of it. You may also have to consider that many clients can't tell good from mediocre (and sometimes bad), or worse, they think their audience can't tell, or don't care, so even if you're "the best", with those clients you have no advantage over the rest of the world. You can only rely on getting regular work from the clients who do not fall into that category.
Hah. Ain't that the truth. I'd like to point at DragonQuest XI as a prime example of horrible music in big-budget productions.

Please note that I also did not touch upon marketing, which, depending on who you ask, may be even more important than all the things we've already mentioned.
 

DarkestShadow

Senior Member
The thing that frustrates me is that I rarely see tracks I love get placements and often wonder why those that get placed were chosen...
So, I can work as hard as I want produce tracks I think are bombshells... but that seems to have no bearing on whether it will be placed or not.
So it's a weird thing. I find 80-90% of trailer tracks to be rather boring and executed somewhat poorly, so I hardly feel intimidated by quality mostly... but it looks like that has no relevance on placements anyway, so I could as well spent 3 hours on a track, do a somewhat decent job and land the next official theatrical Hollywood trailer. That's what bothers me. That's why I don't think about placements but just about producing music I'm proud of. Focusing on placements would irritate the hell out of me since I have no idea what the factors are (except basics like structure and trailerish instrumentation)... to my ears quality is hardly one of them (unless purely in terms of mixing).
 

Desire Inspires

To the stars through desire....
The thing that frustrates me is that I rarely see tracks I love get placements and often wonder why those that get placed were chosen...
So, I can work as hard as I want produce tracks I think are bombshells... but that seems to have no bearing on whether it will be placed or not.
So it's a weird thing. I find 80-90% of trailer tracks to be rather boring and executed somewhat poorly, so I hardly feel intimidated by quality mostly... but it looks like that has no relevance on placements anyway, so I could as well spent 3 hours on a track, do a somewhat decent job and land the next official theatrical Hollywood trailer. That's what bothers me. That's why I don't think about placements but just about producing music I'm proud of. Focusing on placements would irritate the hell out of me since I have no idea what the factors are (except basics like structure and trailerish instrumentation)... to my ears quality is hardly one of them (unless purely in terms of mixing).
That’s the upside; just throw something together and get it out there. You have no control over the rest.
 

Daryl

Senior Member
I find 80-90% of trailer tracks to be rather boring and executed somewhat poorly, so I hardly feel intimidated by quality mostly... but it looks like that has no relevance on placements anyway, so I could as well spent 3 hours on a track, do a somewhat decent job and land the next official theatrical Hollywood trailer.
Rather than focusing on how good or bad musically the tracks are, you need to figure out why they got the placement. Other than nepotism, at the top end of trailer scoring there is always a reason why one track is preferred over another. It often has nothing to do with quality of composition. If being a good composer is your primary focus, forget writing for media. This is a business, and whilst writing good music can be part of being successful, writing good music for picture is not the same thing as writing good music. It can be, but they are not the same thing.
 

averystemmler

Active Member
Trading musical skill for your living is in every way ill advised, and has been since the dawn of civilization. But we're doing it anyways, so what's one more bad decision? :P

In general though, I would suggest putting yourself in your client/customer's shoes. Pretend you have a trailer that needs a'scorin and see what the offerings are. Unfortunately, I think you'll find yourself Scrooge McDucking through enough epic music to fill trailers for generations. Or until the style changes.

Take a special note of what you can't find too. "Man, I really need to release this romantic sheep-centric dark comedy, but there is no music out there with enough farm animal noises for my trailer."

You never know when opportunity will strike.
 

whiskers

Perpetual student
Trading musical skill for your living is in every way ill advised, and has been since the dawn of civilization. But we're doing it anyways, so what's one more bad decision? :P

In general though, I would suggest putting yourself in your client/customer's shoes. Pretend you have a trailer that needs a'scorin and see what the offerings are. Unfortunately, I think you'll find yourself Scrooge McDucking through enough epic music to fill trailers for generations. Or until the style changes.

Take a special note of what you can't find too. "Man, I really need to release this romantic sheep-centric dark comedy, but there is no music out there with enough farm animal noises for my trailer."

You never know when opportunity will strike.
don't a lot of the trailer music tracks go into libraries for licensing too? Seems like a lot of reuse of trailer tracks (not a ton of variety in that type of music). Which is not bad for the person getting the license fee, but that's less room for a newcomer, as not every trailer needs a fresh score, right?
 

MartinH.

Senior Member
So it's a weird thing. I find 80-90% of trailer tracks to be rather boring and executed somewhat poorly, so I hardly feel intimidated by quality mostly... but it looks like that has no relevance on placements anyway, so I could as well spent 3 hours on a track, do a somewhat decent job and land the next official theatrical Hollywood trailer. That's what bothers me.
You're giving noobs like me hope :P
 

Fab

protect your ears!
Every desirable field of work is over saturated. There are too many artists. What we need are soldiers.
 

Shiirai

Resident Crow
Every desirable field of work is over saturated. There are too many artists. What we need are soldiers.
Because we need more war, as periods of prolonged conflict increases the desire for quality entertainment.

You sir, are a genius.

EDIT: And very much in tune with your avatar.
 

paularthur

Jedi in training...
For every 10 trailers i see there's usually one that has a Two Steps From Hell track from like 5-10 years ago and 2-3 that have the same hot track from the year of the reveal. It's a consistency game, takes a lot of patience.
 
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