Is there anything like too much exposure too early?

ranaprathap

Active Member
Hello,

I recently composed a song for a friend of mine. He made a music video for it, and it is now released on a very popular music channel. Like the most popular youtube channel in that language.

I am terrified at this. I didn't expect that level of exposure for this song, and compared with other songs in that channel, it doesn't sound too good.

Have you ever had to face this kind of situations? How do u cope with this? And how do you handle all those negative comments that are going to come?

Edit: A few days after release

Thanks everyone for the comments. Everyone here is super nice.

I was just really freaked out on the day of the release. But the comments are not as bad as I was expecting. Majority complimented the music itself, with most of the negative complaints directed at video production issues.

This has given me enough motivation to do the next one even better. I have professional cinematographers volunteering to do video for my next song, and people have shown their willingness to fund the next one. So it all turned out to be well in the end.
 
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Jimmy Hellfire

Senior Member
"Feedback" is the most uninteresting thing in the world. IMO it's truly useless to think about the thoughts and comments of people. May sound harsh, but just think about it. Who the heck cares.
Apparently there are people out there who get some kind of enjoyment out of your work. Fair enough. Mission accomplished. In any case, making a mediocre song that people enjoy requires more effort and has more substance than doing nothing other than giving your dumb "opinion" on something you don't like.
 

Flaneurette

Active Member
There will always -without exception- someone who doesn't like something. Can't satisfy everyone, nor should we. The more popular you get, the more the ignore knob will turn. You have to at some point. And if you don't make a big deal out of it, no-one else will. Streisand effect and all that... and no-one really cares if it's good or bad, except us. We're setup for failure way too often by listening to others, doubts and second guessing. Follow the heart, it doesn't make mistakes. It's you at that moment in life. If you regret it, learn from it and avoid it next time. Although I would say: make as many mistakes as possible. It's the quickest road in mastering anything.
 

Parsifal666

I don't even own a DAW, I'm just a troll.
it's terrible -- picture what a disaster it was for the Beatles
For an even more recent (and far less musical) example, look at Kiss. Two years after they put out their first album they were on top of the world, outselling the solo Beatles, Zeppelin, Elton John, etc. Two years after they went on an astonishingly quick downslide. Too much of them, too soon. Oversaturation is probably what ended up killing them in the 70s.
 

Parsifal666

I don't even own a DAW, I'm just a troll.
What people think about what you do is none of your business. If it's something positive/constructive, use it. Anything else you have the full rights to laugh at, ignore. That's how I do it.
 

JohnG

Senior Member
Kiss? Not to quibble, but I don't think one can reasonably compare Kiss with The Beatles. The Beatles covered such a range, including, actually, their "look," whereas my impression was that Kiss did mostly one main thing -- dress up in a certain way and play in one style -- from beginning to end. I think they were trapped, having started out with a sensational look that grew quickly dull once it had been seen.

The Beatles covered a huge range, musically and otherwise.

[penalty flag for digressing -- apologies]
 

dannymc

Senior Member
but OP do you want the exposure at some stage? i think there are generally two types of artist/composer out there when it comes to this. those who want all the fame and exposure that goes along with it and those who are happy to just put out their art whilst staying in the shadows. Max Martins comes to mind. the guy has wrote pretty much every top 40 pop song in the last decade but yet most people have no idea who he is. not that he's bothered too much with his £200 million fortune in the bank.

Danny
 
OP
ranaprathap

ranaprathap

Active Member
but OP do you want the exposure at some stage? i think there are generally two types of artist/composer out there when it comes to this. those who want all the fame and exposure that goes along with it and those who are happy to just put out their art whilst staying in the shadows. Max Martins comes to mind. the guy has wrote pretty much every top 40 pop song in the last decade but yet most people have no idea who he is. not that he's bothered too much with his £200 million fortune in the bank.

Danny
I want exposure at some point, but I was not sure whether I was ready for this high an exposure this early in my career. That too on a song I didn't think was worthy enough.

I got lucky early in my career I guess.
 

Greg

Senior Member
Hesitation over being exposed is something SO many artists struggle with. Getting over that huge hurdle as early as possible is the biggest blessing you could ask for. Don't dwell on the "what if" just keep your focus on what you really want to achieve.
 

Flaneurette

Active Member
I had a good taste of fame 10 years ago in an unrelated field of expertise. I know how it feels. I felt frightened as well. It is something that other people can't understand when it doesn't happen to them. To this day, it has affected me, so much so, that I cherish privacy now. Once you become public, you'll become public domain. Everyone seems to own you. Everyone will have an opinion about you, and tell it to you. You get total strangers talking to you as if you were good friends. Rumors will be spread by jealous and resentful people. I call it twilight instead of limelight. It's really weird. But then it dawns on you: it is not about you, it is about everyone else. Your fans, your work. Once you realize this, you become humble. You start to give, give your best. Then give it all.

If you want it, go for it. But as the saying goes: be careful what you wish for, you might get it... ;)

I can recommend this little book: one small step can change your life, by Robert Maurer, PhD.

It deals with kaizen, a Japanese method of doing things. The gist of it is simple: the brain is programmed to resist change. The amygdala in the brain sets of an alarm when change is imminent, shutting down the cortex or thinking part so that it can run or fight. Fighting is the last option, so we feel fear and resist change. Even minute changes, such as going to a new bar or restaurant creates fear. To prevent this, the Kaizen method teaches you how to take small steps to a goal, so that it won't trigger the amygdala.

Also useful for dealing with stage-freight.
 
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dannymc

Senior Member
Also useful for dealing with stage-fright.
Hans Zimmer recently admitted to suffering from stage fright during his last concert tour. its funny maybe if he hadn't of had this fear early in his career he would not of become the amazing film composer he is today and instead would of pursued a career to being a global rock star. funny how things work out in the end, so many of us may never of been inspired if the great works from gladiator, inception, interstellar were never created.

Danny
 

chimuelo

Star Of Stage & Screen
Rejection is one of the best motivators.
Dance, Theater, Music is based on your skills and talent.
Same with sports.

All of us belong to the real world.
How about a link to share with us.
I'll even buy it as long as the price is where the market suggests..
 
OP
ranaprathap

ranaprathap

Active Member
"Feedback" is the most uninteresting thing in the world. IMO it's truly useless to think about the thoughts and comments of people. May sound harsh, but just think about it. Who the heck cares.
Apparently there are people out there who get some kind of enjoyment out of your work. Fair enough. Mission accomplished. In any case, making a mediocre song that people enjoy requires more effort and has more substance than doing nothing other than giving your dumb "opinion" on something you don't like.
Thanks for the comment. I think the people at the audio label got some enjoyment out of it and that is why they decided to release it.

But for a beginner like me, I think feedback is essential to understand what majority of the listeners are expecting. But then there is useful and useless kind of feedback.
 
OP
ranaprathap

ranaprathap

Active Member
There will always -without exception- someone who doesn't like something. Can't satisfy everyone, nor should we. The more popular you get, the more the ignore knob will turn. You have to at some point. And if you don't make a big deal out of it, no-one else will. Streisand effect and all that... and no-one really cares if it's good or bad, except us. We're setup for failure way too often by listening to others, doubts and second guessing. Follow the heart, it doesn't make mistakes. It's you at that moment in life. If you regret it, learn from it and avoid it next time. Although I would say: make as many mistakes as possible. It's the quickest road in mastering anything.
Thanks for the comment.

I read the comments at other videos on that channel, and even on songs that I considered really good, there are some negative comments. So you were right in that can't satisfy everyone.

There are regrets I had from this project, I will learn from them and improve next time, I guess.
 
OP
ranaprathap

ranaprathap

Active Member
it's terrible -- picture what a disaster it was for the Beatles
I am not aware of the history but I don't think their first song ever was suddenly put into lime light, I believe they rather had a slow rise to the fame?

Not that I am complaining, I was just really freaked out.