Is anyone here using a notation program to make their mockups?

Discussion in 'NOTATION Speak: Sibelius, Finale & Dorico' started by Virtual Virgin, Sep 11, 2018.

  1. Virtual Virgin

    Virtual Virgin Active Member

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    If so, which programs are "performing" the best?
    Are you using them as a standalone, or in conjunction with your DAW?
     
  2. Rodney Money

    Rodney Money My hair is now growing back.

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    Before I switched to Cubase for rendering I got Finale to do this:
     
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  3. d.healey

    d.healey Music Monkey

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    I use notation to create my compositions but not for my mockups. If you're going to be giving the music to musicians then the output you get from a score writer is fine, but if the end result is going to be created using virtual instruments the performance you will get from a score writer can't compete with what you can create in a DAW.
     
  4. muk

    muk Senior Member

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    Nope, neither nor. As David wrote, the audio output of each and every notation program is far behind what can be achieved with sample libraries in a DAW. The best you can do with notation programs is with Arne Wallander's NotePerformer in my opinion.

    https://www.noteperformer.com/

    Stunning piece of software, and it's comparably inexpensive. It really lets you hear if what you wrote would work with real instruments. For me it's an invaluable tool for composing. For mockups I still reach for my DAW, though.
     
  5. jamieboo

    jamieboo Active Member

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    I write all my orchestral mockups in Cubase's Score Editor. I am ridiculous.
     
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  6. ptram

    ptram Senior Member

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    Rodney, while not as realistic as required by a final production, this mockup is incredibly convincing. Was this also due to the Human Performance algorhythms of Finale?

    Is there a reason you eventually switched to a DAW? And, do you think that separation between written and played notes in Dorico could have helped you staying in the notation software?

    Paolo
     
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  7. Rodney Money

    Rodney Money My hair is now growing back.

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    It was a mixture of the human playback feature in Finale and layering the articulations such as using shorts for accents and cimbasso for tuba accents. I switched to a DAW because I am extremely expressive when I play live which Finale cannot capture. I felt like Finale was playing my mock-ups, not me, so I switch to DAW so I could play everything in live like this:
     
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  8. Vik

    Vik Scandi Member

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  9. Massimo

    Massimo Active Member

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    Hi Jamie, if you don't mind me asking... are you aware of any course that is specific on learning Cubase Score editor, I have always found this powerful part of Cubase neglected by people who teach Cubase... I think that a specific course on the score editor would be very popular... Cheers, Max T.
     
  10. bryla

    bryla Senior Member

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    When I do arrangements or compositions for a concert the artist or producer wants a track for approval or for rehearsal. I write it all in Sibelius so I just use the Noteperformer sounds for the output.
     
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  11. jamieboo

    jamieboo Active Member

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    I'm afraid I am not aware of any such course. But I agree that it is a rather neglected element in terms of available tutorial resources.
    I also gather that it is generally not that well regarded by people who know their score editors!
    I only use it out of habit and for reasons connected with my silly workflow. I use mouse to enter notes on the stave, note by note - I do not play things in.
    But I do not really read music.
    So as I am positioning the note, I need to hear all potential notes as I hover over them over the stave. When I hear the note I need, I release the mouse button.
    For this rather unwieldy process to work best for me I need to be able to have the whole range of chromatic notes available for me right there as I'm hovering over the stave. But pretty much every other 'proper' notation package I've tried requires a chosen key signature - after which hovering over the stave only sounds the diatonic notes of that chosen scale. Sure you can enter a note and flatten or sharpen it after if necessary but it just doesn't work for me. I need to have the full chromatic range available to me immediately as I position the note.
     
  12. Popslaw

    Popslaw New Member

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    I used to do everything in Sibelius before switching to Cubase. It can be tedious to get decent results, but in some ways I still prefer the work flow to that of Cubase. Here are a few examples of Sibelius-only mock-ups.

    In a Village



    In a Mosque

     
  13. OP
    OP
    Virtual Virgin

    Virtual Virgin Active Member

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    These are quite impressive with Sibelius. Is this with Note Performer?
     
  14. Popslaw

    Popslaw New Member

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    Thank you very much.

    No, all notes were entered by point-and-click with mouse into the score. It required quite a lot of tweaking of nearly every note to get the timing and dynamics to sound remotely realistic.
     
  15. Massimo

    Massimo Active Member

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    Thanks for your kind reply and feedback... Cheers, Max T.
     
  16. Mackieguy

    Mackieguy New Member

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    Depends on the score. If it's really orchestral in nature then I kinda cheat a little bit. I'll do the initial mockup in Sibelius/Dorico (using Dorico more and more as it develops) and map it to a good, general library. Right now, I'm all about using Spitfire Symphonic Orchestra as a great basic library. By using a notation app, I find it a lot easier to get the writing done more efficiently as I can see it in a more "musical" manner, especially as I'll print stuff out and scribble notes in by hand and then go back to the computer and enter in what I've written. It can be really circular but it keeps me in a musical frame of mind. It allows me to set basic dynamics, switch between Solo, a2, a6, etc. all that stuff. Once the notes are more or less complete, THEN I'll move over to Cubase, import the MIDI from Sibelius/Dorico and start doing deep level programming from there using a multitude of libraries, articulations on separate tracks, FX, final mix, etc.

    If I'm combining orchestra with other stuff, I'll still use Sibelius for the orch. as it can tempo-lock via rewire to Cubase. I'll put the Spitfire orchestral elements in Sibelius and other stuff (soft synths, guitars, screams, bleeps, bloops, etc. all going direct to Cubase). Rewire gets it all to play together.

    But if there's minimal orchestra in the piece then I'm pretty much completely within Cubase all the way to final mix.

    Hope this makes some kind of sense. :)
     

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