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Irish flute for exposed parts?

Denkii

Active Member
Any recommendations for an Irish flute/low whistle library?
Please don't tell me to get cinewinds pro :notworthy:
 
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Denkii

Denkii

Active Member
Thanks for dropping (obvious) names. I hoped for more background information as to why X vs. Y.

Considering getting the ISW tin whistle for 100 sounds daunting when you look at Celtic Era for 250 which comes with tin and Irish whistle and so much more. What do you guys like or dislike when it comes to these or other libraries?
 
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Denkii

Denkii

Active Member
Thanks everyone. I will binge whatever YouTube videos I can find about these.:2thumbs:
 
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Denkii

Denkii

Active Member
After researching this some more, I get drawn towards Celtic era more and more because I'm also looking for a fiddle and some bagpipes. Plus it comes with tin and low whistle.

I've never worked with best service products. I assume there is no Kontakt equivalent that comes as a similar package and I'd have to get everything solo if I wanted to keep it in Kontakt?

Is there anything I need to know about the best service engine?
 

Shredoverdrive

Active Member
The GUI is antiquated and unglamorous as hell. And Windows updates sometimes make you have to reauthorize the software. Apart from those two (minor) cons, it's not bad at all, IMO. It works well and it's quite powerful. Ah, the onboard convolution reverb (named "Origami") is really good but quite CPU hungry (but you can switch it off to put your own of course).
 
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Mark Schmieder

Senior Member
I'm pretty confused what you're looking for. Tin whistles (metal, small, specific to each playing key), low whistles (usually similar in most ways), or folk flute (transverse, similar to metal concert flute but made of wood -- most commonly ebony but sometimes boxwood, pear, etc. -- and often keyless but fully chromatic). There are no Irish wood flute libraries currently, but the real deal can be had for $400+ (I bought one late last year). I'll check my notes when I'm more caught up though, to make sure there isn't a library that mislabeled the wood flute or used an unconventional categorization.
 
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Denkii

Denkii

Active Member
I'm pretty confused what you're looking for.
Trust me at this point I don't know any more either.
It started with low whistle. Then I realized I want bagpipes too. Then I realized a fiddle would be great. Now I realize a hurdy gurdy would also be good.
 

Mark Schmieder

Senior Member
I can make recommendations for all of those, but only once well-rested (I haven't had much sleep since my travels from half-way across the world late SAT night).

For fiddle though, the "Fiddle!" library from Bolder Sounds is an excellent choice for Celtic music -- especially after its recent update. It's a new library, affordable, and reacts to the player vs. requiring lots of key switches and the like.
 

Ashermusic

Senior Member
Celtic Era, sounds great, like all of Tari’s libraries. But for a more straight ahead approach I do also really like the Embertone Shire Whistle.
 
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Mark Schmieder

Senior Member
Celtic Era covers most of the bases, now that I have reviewed my notes and projects more thoroughly. Especially for bagpipes (it implements the drone properly, which few do), tenor banjo (used almost like a fiddle vs. bluegrass style), even celtic flute (I'm too tired to check it out to see if it is wood or metal), harp, bodhran.

Bolder Sounds Fiddle! is top of the game, and reacts to your playing, sort of like SWAM. The one in Celtic Era is also quite good, but isn't as extensive or as thoroughly scripted for playability as Fiddle! from Bolder Sounds. Dennis Burns may have added a Tenor Banjo to his excellent Banjo library as well; I didn't see it listed in my annotation but I'm about to collapse from a week of 12-hour intense problem-solving tech day, so anything I do tonight that isn't from memory is prone to error
 
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